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Newburyport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
, 1822, and came to the United States when he was five years old; taught in Philadelphia and contributed to the Home journal. Some of his publications are Life of Horace Greeley (1855) ; humorous poetry of the English Language from Chaucer to Saxe (1856); Life and times of Aaron Burr (1857) ; life of Andrew Jackson (3 vols., 1859-60); General Butler in New Orleans (1863); Life and times of Benjamin Franklin (1864); Life of Thomas Jefferson (1874); and Life of Voltaire (1881). Died in Newburyport, Mass., Oct. 17, 1891. Percival, James Gates Born in Berlin, Conn., Sept. 15, 1795. He graduated from Yale in 1815 and studied medicine and botany. Later he was appointed assistant surgeon in the army. He contributed articles to the U. S. Literary magazine; studied geology and was appointed to assist in making a survey of the mineralogy and geology of Connecticut, the results of which are given in his Report of the geology of the state of Connecticut (1842). His poems Prometheus and
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
odd. She died at Amherst, May 15, 1886. Dickinson, John Born in Maryland, Nov. 13, 1732. He studied law in Philadelphia and in London and practiced successfully in Philadelphia; was a member of the First Continental Congress and the author of a series of state papers put forth by that body. In 1788, he wrote nine letters signed Fabius, and was the author of Letters from a Pennsylvania farmer to the inhabitants of the British colonies (1767); Essays on the constitutional power of great Britain over the colonies in America (1774). Died in Wilmington, Del., Feb. 14, 1808. Drake, Joseph Rodman Born in New York City, Aug. 7, 1795. Left an orphan, he suffered the hardships of poverty and after a brief business career, studied medicine. At fourteen he wrote the poem The Mocking bird. In 1819, he, with Fitz-Greene Halleck, contributed to the N. Y. Evening post a series of humorous verses called The Croakers. His fame chiefly rests on his poem The Culprit Fay, written in 181
North America (search for this): chapter 12
ses on Franklin, Washington, Adams and Jefferson. Died in Florence, Italy, May 10, 1860. Parkman, Francis Born in Boston, Mass., Sept. 16, 1823. Graduating at Harvard in 1844, he studied law, but devoted himself to literary work, contributing articles to the Knickerbocker magazine, which were collected and published as The Oregon Trail (1849). Other publications are The Conspiracy of Pontiac (1851) ; Pioneers of France in the New world (1865); The book of Roses (1866); Jesuits in North America (1867); discovery of the great West (1869); The old Regime in Canada (1874); Count Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV. (1877); and Montcalm and Wolfe (1884). Died at Jamaica Plain, Mass., Nov. 8, 1893. Parton, James He was born in Canterbury, England, Feb. 9, 1822, and came to the United States when he was five years old; taught in Philadelphia and contributed to the Home journal. Some of his publications are Life of Horace Greeley (1855) ; humorous poetry of the English L
Wilmington (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Born in Maryland, Nov. 13, 1732. He studied law in Philadelphia and in London and practiced successfully in Philadelphia; was a member of the First Continental Congress and the author of a series of state papers put forth by that body. In 1788, he wrote nine letters signed Fabius, and was the author of Letters from a Pennsylvania farmer to the inhabitants of the British colonies (1767); Essays on the constitutional power of great Britain over the colonies in America (1774). Died in Wilmington, Del., Feb. 14, 1808. Drake, Joseph Rodman Born in New York City, Aug. 7, 1795. Left an orphan, he suffered the hardships of poverty and after a brief business career, studied medicine. At fourteen he wrote the poem The Mocking bird. In 1819, he, with Fitz-Greene Halleck, contributed to the N. Y. Evening post a series of humorous verses called The Croakers. His fame chiefly rests on his poem The Culprit Fay, written in 1816. The Culprit Fay and other poems was published in 1836. He
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
e occupied several government positions. Died at Plymouth, N. H., May 18, 1864. Hayne, Paul Hamilton Born in Charleston, S. C., Jan. 1, 1830. He graduated at the College of South Carolina and studied law, but gave up legal practice for literPoems (1888), issued after his death. Died in Cleveland, O,, Feb. 27, 1887. Simms, William Gilmore Born in Charleston, S. C., April 17, 1806. He studied law, but in 1828 became editor and partial owner of the Charleston City Gazette. His of War poetry of the South (1867). A collection of his best works was published in nineteen volumes (1859). Died in Charleston, S. C., June 11, 1870. Stockton, Francis Richard Born in Philadelphia, Penn., April 5, 1834. He became an engraver,ous persons (1865); and A Yankee in Canada (1866). Died in Concord, Mass., May 6, 1862. Timrod, Henry Born in Charleston, S. C., Dec. 8, 1829. He attended the University of Georgia and then studied law, but became a war correspondent for the
Wolcott (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (Names of living authors are omitted.) Alcott, Amos Bronson Born in Wolcott, Conn., Nov. 29, 1799. He established a school for children in Boston, which was very successful until the press denounced it on account of the advanced ideas of the teacher. He then gave up the school and devoted his time to the study of philosophy and reforms, and later moved to Concord, Mass., where he founded the so-called school of philosophy, and became one of its leaders. He contributed to The Dial and published Tablets (1868), Concord days (1872), Table talk (1877), Sonnets and Canzonets (1882), and an Essay (1865), presented to Emerson on his birthday. Emerson had a great veneration for him. Died in Boston, Mass., March 4, 1888. Austin, William Born in Charlestown, Mass., March 2, 1778. He graduated from Harvard in 1798, studied law, and became eminent as a practitioner. Spending some time in England, he published, as a
Granada (Spain) (search for this): chapter 12
nder the pen-name of Jonathan Oldstyle. In 1807, he issued, with others, a periodical called Salmagundi, or the whim-whams and opinions of Launcelot Langstaff, Esq. A history of New York, . . . By Diedrich Knickerbocker, appeared in 1809; and during the war of 1812 he wrote for the Analectic magazine. The Sketch-book was published in 1819. It was followed by Bracebridge hall (1822); Tales of a Traveller (1824); Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus (1828); Chronicle of the conquest of Granada (1829); The Alhambra (1832); Tour on the prairies (1835); Astoria (1836); Adventures of Captain Booneville (1837); his complete works (1848-50); Mahomet and his successors (1849-50); Oliver Goldsmith, a biography (1849); WVolfert's Roost, and other papers (1855); Life of George Washington (1855-59). Died at Sunnyside, Irvington, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1859. Jackson, Helen Fiske (Hunt) Born in Amherst, Mass., Oct. 18, 1831. She was the daughter of Prof. Nathan W. Fiske, and married in Octobe
Norwich (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
(1873); Sonnets and Lyrics (1886). Died in San Francisco, Aug. 12, 1885. Knight, Sarah Born in Boston, Mass., April 19, 1666. She was the daughter of Capt. Thomas Kemble and wife of Richard Knight, and taught school in Boston, counting among her pupils Benjamin Franklin and Samuel Mather. Her Journey from Boston to New York in the year 1704,from the original manuscript, including the diary of the Rev. John Buckingham of a journey to Canada in 1710, was published in 1825. Died at Norwich, Conn., Sept. 25, 1727. Lanier, Sidney Born in Macon, Ga., Feb. 3, 1842. He graduated from Oglethorpe College, Midway, Ga., in 1860, and served in the Confederate army during the Civil War. He published Tiger-Lilies in 1867, and was after the war a clerk, and principal of an academy, and later practiced law with his father; then became a lecturer in English literature. In 1880 he wrote his poem Sunrise. Some of his works are Florida: its scenery, Climate, and history (1876); Poems (187
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ter-fowl. Numerous other volumes appeared between that date and 1864. The translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey were published between 1870 and 1872. In 1825 he gave up the practice of the law to become editor of The New York Review. A year later he became assistant editor of The New York evening post, and in 1829 assumed the editorship. This responsible position he held till his death, which occurred in New York City, June 12, 1878. Channing, William Ellery He was born at Newport, R. I., April 7, 1780. Here his boyhood was passed, and here he received his first strong religious impressions. Graduating from Harvard, he became an instructor in a family in Richmond, Va., where he acquired an abhorrence of slavery; later he studied theology at Cambridge, and his first and only pastoral settlement was in Boston. He became widely known as the leader of the Unitarians, and his numerous writings, published singly, were brought together in five volumes (Boston, 1841) just be
Westbury (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
He attended the University of Georgia and then studied law, but became a war correspondent for the Charleston Mercury and later editor of a paper in Columbia, S. C. All his possessions were destroyed at the time of Sherman's march to the sea, and, overcome by poverty and ill-health, he died at Columbia, S. C., Oct. 6, 1867. A volume of his poems appeared in 1860, and in 1873 The poems of Henry Timrod, edited, with a sketch of the poet's life, by Paul H. Hayne. Trumbull, John Born in Westbury (now Watertown), Conn., April 24, 1750. Graduating from Yale in 1767, he became tutor there and then studied law. His published works include The progress of Dulness (1772-74) ; an Elegy on the times (1774); his famous McFingal, a modern Epic poem (1774-82). He was associated with the Hartford wits in the production of The Anarchiad (1786-87), and was judge of the superior court from 1801 until 1819. The poetical works of John Trumbull were published in 1820. Died in Detroit, Mich., May 1
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