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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3.

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Harriet Martineau (search for this): chapter 1
cost of the resignation of a few members like Dr. Wardlaw (Lib. 11.77, 89, 93, 149; Mss. Feb. 23, 1841, R. Wardlaw to J. A. Collins, and May 2, 1841, Collins to W. L. G.; and Collins's letter to the Glasgow Argus, April 26, 1841). Finally, Harriet Martineau took her stand with Mr. Garrison, Collins, and their associates in the most pronounced manner (Lib. 11: 51; Ms. Feb. 20, 1841, Miss Martineau to Collins). George Thompson's open adhesion came later (Lib. 11.145, 201). The result was in all Miss Martineau to Collins). George Thompson's open adhesion came later (Lib. 11.145, 201). The result was in all respects, pecuniary and moral, disastrous to the British and Foreign A. S. Society. We supposed he would make his appeal to the abolitionists at large and take Lib. 11.53. his chance accordingly. I fear, also, that he may not have been so guarded at all times in his language as could have been desirable, respecting the transfer of the Emancipator—a Ante, 2.342, 343, 351. transfer that was certainly very dishonorable, and wholly unworthy of the character of those who participated in it. Gerri
October 1st, 1841 AD (search for this): chapter 1
aker (Ms. Dec. 13, 1845, to R. D. Webb). lost no time in securing Mr. Douglass as an agent of the Massachusetts Society; and the late graduate from the peculiar Life of F. Douglass, p. 217. institution, with his diploma written on his back, as Collins used to say, proved an invaluable accession to the apostles Lib. 12.11. of abolition. One other glimpse of Mr. Garrison's lecturing at this period must suffice. We bargained last year, wrote N. P. Rogers in his Herald of Freedom for October 1, 1841, Writings of N. P. Rogers, p. 167. with our beloved fellow-traveller Garrison, in the Scottish Highlands, either on Loch Katrine, on board the barge rowed by McFarlan and his three Highlanders, or else as we rode the Shetland ponies from Katrine to Loch Lomond, through Rob Roy's country, and along his native heath, and when we were gazing upward at the mist-clad mountains, that if ever we lived to get home again to our dear New England, we would go and show him New Hampshire's sterner
Beriah Green (search for this): chapter 1
mself to the law (Ms. Mar. 14, 1841, N. P. Rogers to W. L. G.; Lib. 12: 127), of which he would begin the practice in Boston the following year (Stanton's Random Recollections, 2d ed., p. 58). He was supposed to be aiming at a seat in Congress (Lib. 12: 127), and though he never attained it, in spite of a Liberty Party nomination (Lib. 14: 174), he remained a politician to the end of his days. Wright is—we scarcely know Elizur Wright. A. A. Phelps. where; and doing—we know not what. Beriah Green knew, though he put the question to Mr. Wright (Lib. 11: 82), What are you at? Has La Fontaine led you off altogether from the field of battle? The preface to Wright's translation bears date September, 1841. Meantime the apologetic, pro-slavery conduct of the Free American by a clerical successor of Torrey (Lib. 11: 82, 91), whom even he had to denounce, forced the Mass. Abolition Society to make a shift of securing Mr. Wright's services as editor once more in June, 1841 (Lib. 11.99).
Edward Beecher (search for this): chapter 1
us doctrine, what a delusive error, and how utterly destructive to the life and growth of true holiness!], because he is born of God. In this the children of God are manifest, and the children of the devil. A sentiment attributed to the Rev. Edward Beecher, Lib. 11.191. President of Jacksonville (Ill.) College, in the course of some lectures in Boston, furnished another occasion for the display of Mr. Garrison's magnanimity, towards Noyes in particular. The stanch friend of Lovejoy was r be a lie? Is it no longer to be asserted in the presence of tyranny? Christianity has been dishonored and betrayed by millions who have assumed the Christian profession; but is it henceforth to be abjured on that account? The attempt of Pres. Beecher to associate non-resistants with deists and atheists is not merely absurd—not merely unfortunate—not merely censurable—but it is a flagrant assault upon the character of Jesus, who suffered for us, leaving us an example that we should follow <
Andrew Oliver (search for this): chapter 1
ralizing effect upon himself, unsuspected at the time, of those ‘memorable interviews and conversations, in the hall, in the lobbies, or around the doors,’ of which Emerson tells ( Lectures and Biographical Sketches, ed. 1884, p. 354). On the appearance of Theodore Parker's epochmaking ordination sermon on ‘The Transient and Permanent in Christianity,’ preached May 19, 1841 (Frothingham's Life of Parker, p. 152, Weiss's Life, 1.165), Garrison said gravely to his friend Johnson, ‘Infidelity, Oliver, infidelity!’ So thought most of the Unitarian clergy; and the denomination first gave it official currency, as at once respectable and conservative doctrine, in 1885 (see the volume, Views of religion, a selection from Parker's sermons). In reviewing, in January, 1842, a volume of religious poetry by Mrs. Sophia L. Little, of Pawtucket, Mr. Garrison said: ‘Whatever goes to exalt the character of the Saviour is at all times valuable; but never more than when, as at the present time, a
Joshua Leavitt (search for this): chapter 1
together! No wonder you can't cooperate with a suit of old clothes! It had no agents in the field; it rendered no Lib. 11.37; 12.127. financial accounts. Joshua Leavitt, who had been made its secretary, while continuing to edit the Emancipator, found that it had no vital or organizing power, and at the close of the year was Scoble, who was the Lewis Tappan of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, another specious organization. Lib. 22.9. Extraordinary, we are reminded by Leavitt's unsettling, was the dispersion of those whom hostility to the Liberator had momentarily banded together to break it down. On the occasion of Torrey's valedictoenounce, forced the Mass. Abolition Society to make a shift of securing Mr. Wright's services as editor once more in June, 1841 (Lib. 11.99). He was succeeded by Leavitt as above, and the paper became the Emancipator and Free American (Lib. 11: 191, 203). In 1842 Mr. Wright, in a desperate struggle with poverty, was trying persona
March 2nd, 1841 AD (search for this): chapter 1
—a task made doubly difficult after Colver's slanders had been Ante, 2.429. industriously put in circulation under the official cover of the Lib. 11.174; Ms. Mar. 2, 1841, Collins to E. Quincy. Executive Committee of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. The Sabbath [Chardon-Street] Convention, wrote Collins to Mr. Garrion Committee determined many to side with the old organization who might else have remained either indifferent or deceived. See Collins's letter to E. Quincy, Mar. 2, 1841 (Ms.). The attempt of the Executive Committee of the Glasgow Emancipation Society, under the influence of Captain Stuart, to follow suit in rebuffing Collins a England's queen? asked Mr. Garrison in his sonnet to Elizabeth Pease (Lib. 12.4). Colver was efficiently seconded by Torrey, temporarily Lib. 11.11; Ms. Mar. 2, 1841, J. A. Collins to W. L. G. Lib. 11.23, 55, 79; 14: 31; Ms. Feb. 1, 1841, J. W. Alden to London Committee. conducting the Massachusetts Abolitionist, who brough
Elizabeth Smith Miller (search for this): chapter 1
it of Christ. Christ is its pattern, its theme, its hope, its rejoicing, its advocate and protector, its author and finisher, its Alpha and Omega. . . . It appears that the subject of his [Beecher's] discourse was The last times, or the end of the world; and, in order suitably to affect the minds of those who listened to him, and to prepare them for the speedy coming of the Son of Man (an event, by the way, which we believe transpired eighteen Lib. 13.23, 27. hundred years ago), Father Miller, the head of the Second-Adventists, and so-called end-ofthe-world man, was at this epoch preaching in Massachusetts that the day of probation, preceding the millennium, was no further off than a date somewhere between the vernal equinoxes of 1843-44. he warns them to beware of those who abjure all stations of worldly trust and preferment; who insist that Christians cannot wield carnal weapons for the destruction of their enemies; who, when smitten on the one cheek, turn the other also to
Robert Owen (search for this): chapter 1
this or to Mr. Garrison led the venerable philanthropist to speak of the evils resulting from destroying the Sabbath or religion, and of the dangerous influence of Owenism. It required no sagacity, adds Collins, to see his design in referring to Owen, Robert Owen. etc. . . Owenism, in Great Britain, is considered Ante, 2.390. double-distilled infidelity. Your views are being considered of the Owen school. Socialism is thrown upon us both (Ms.—1841, Collins to W. L. G.). You are the Great LRobert Owen. etc. . . Owenism, in Great Britain, is considered Ante, 2.390. double-distilled infidelity. Your views are being considered of the Owen school. Socialism is thrown upon us both (Ms.—1841, Collins to W. L. G.). You are the Great Lion which stands in my way. Likewise, on February 3, Collins writes to Francis Jackson: Garrison is a hated and persecuted man in England. Calumny and reproach are heaped upon him in the greatest possible degree. Ms. And, in a letter to Mr. Garrison himself, Richard D. Webb, Ms. on May 30, reported that Joseph Sturge, the weightiest member of the London Committee, regarded the mere defence of Garrison and Collins by Elizabeth Pease and William Smeal as a species of persecution directed agai
Joshua Coffin (search for this): chapter 1
de within two years (ante, 2: 76), he maintained the right of free discussion (Lib. 7: 182). The other (for no game was too small for this inquisition) was the same body's refusal to confirm the postmaster of Philadelphia unless he discharged Joshua Coffin (newly appointed) from his letter-carriers; Coffin's alleged offence being that he had once assisted in ransoming a kidnapped free person of color. Lib. 11.146, 211. The sacrifice demanded was made, and even letter-carriers were taught to knCoffin's alleged offence being that he had once assisted in ransoming a kidnapped free person of color. Lib. 11.146, 211. The sacrifice demanded was made, and even letter-carriers were taught to know the hand that fed them. More significant of the nominal character of the socalled Union were the efforts of Georgia and Virginia, on Lib. 10.1, 5, 9; 11.14, 54, 57, 183. account of the refusal of Northern governors to surrender as felons citizens charged with aiding slaves to escape, to establish quarantine against the ships of Maine and New York. More desperately unconstitutional was the proposal of Governor McDonald of Georgia, that even Lib. 11.183. packages from New York or any like
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