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edings has been recorded by the chief actor in them. This was Frederick S. J. May's Recollections, p. 292. Douglass of New Bedford, formerly a Maryland slave, and only for three years a freeman by virtue of being a fugitive. His extraordinary oratorical powers were hardly suspected by himself, and he had never addressed any but his own color when he was induced to narrate his experiences at Nantucket. It was, he says, with the utmost difficulty that I could Life of F. Douglass, ed. 1882, p. 216; Cf. Anna Gardner's Harvest Gleanings, pp. 17-19. stand erect, or that I could command and articulate two words without hesitation and stammering. I trembled in every limb. Lib. 15.75. I am not sure that my embarrassment was not the most effective part of my speech, if speech it could be called. At any rate, this is about the only part of my performance that I now distinctly remember. The audience sympathized with me at once, and, from having been remarkably quiet, became much ex
is last phrase being probably suggested by James G. Birney's tract, The American Churches the Bulwarks of American Slavery (published first, anonymously, in London, Sept. 23, 1840; in a second and third [American] edition in Newburyport, Mass., in 1842; and again, in Boston, in May, 1843). Phoebe Jackson wrote from Providence, Nov. 18, 1842, to Mrs. Garrison, of the recently held annual meeting of the Rhode Island A. S. Society: The strong ground taken by Rogers, Foster, and a few others occasioced the Mass. Abolition Society to make a shift of securing Mr. Wright's services as editor once more in June, 1841 (Lib. 11.99). He was succeeded by Leavitt as above, and the paper became the Emancipator and Free American (Lib. 11: 191, 203). In 1842 Mr. Wright, in a desperate struggle with poverty, was trying personally to find purchasers for his translation (Lib. 12: 127). Phelps is a city missionary, and on the most amicable terms with Hubbard Lib. 12.127. Winslow, George W. Blagden, et i
eiss's Life, 1.165), Garrison said gravely to his friend Johnson, ‘Infidelity, Oliver, infidelity!’ So thought most of the Unitarian clergy; and the denomination first gave it official currency, as at once respectable and conservative doctrine, in 1885 (see the volume, Views of religion, a selection from Parker's sermons). In reviewing, in January, 1842, a volume of religious poetry by Mrs. Sophia L. Little, of Pawtucket, Mr. Garrison said: ‘Whatever goes to exalt the character of the Saviour isizes an existence in absolute opposition to the doctrine of Jesus, and the Church endeavors to demonstrate that men who live contrary to the doctrine of Jesus really live in accordance with that doctrine (Count Leo Tolstoi's My religion, New York, 1885, pp. 214, 215, 221). with the robbing of the poor, with worldliness and ambition, with a participation in all popular iniquities. Hence, when abolitionism declares that no man can love God who enslaves another, they deny it, and assert that man-s<
atarian letter from Clarkson, which Nathaniel Colver had craftily procured, and introduced at the earliest moment. The snare was too obviously meant—on the one hand for Mr. Garrison himself, on the other for the Lectures and Biog. Sketches, ed. 1884, p. 354. Convention, whose members sought, as Emerson well said, something better and more satisfying than a vote or a definition. This peculiar body met once more and finally on the Lib. 11.175, 178, 179. 26th, 27th, and 28th of October, 1841 (p. 64), showing the liberalizing effect upon himself, unsuspected at the time, of those ‘memorable interviews and conversations, in the hall, in the lobbies, or around the doors,’ of which Emerson tells ( Lectures and Biographical Sketches, ed. 1884, p. 354). On the appearance of Theodore Parker's epochmaking ordination sermon on ‘The Transient and Permanent in Christianity,’ preached May 19, 1841 (Frothingham's Life of Parker, p. 152, Weiss's Life, 1.165), Garrison said gravely to his fri
. S. Society at Philadelphia in December, 1841, at which, however, the temporary suspension of the Freeman in favor of the Standard was voted (Lib. 12: 2, 3, 7, 8). Of the numerous meetings and conventions now instituted, that at Nantucket in August was a conspicuous Aug. 10, 11, 12, 1841; Lib. 11.130, 134. example of the glad renewal of anti-slavery fellowship (the sectarian spirit having been exorcised), and was otherwise memorable. No report is left of the social delights of companions. F. Mellen (ante, 2: 428), entitled, An Argument on the Unconstitutionality of Slavery. Mr. Garrison, on a hasty reading, judged it to deserve attention (Lib. 11.123); but when, at the Millbury quarterly meeting of the Mass. A. S. Society, in August, Mellen, in conjunction with S. S. Foster, attempted to embody this argument in a resolution, they were defeated (Lib. 11.139). It will be seen hereafter how the doctrine was forced upon the Third Party. So far, indeed, the Liberty Party might ha
n together! No wonder you can't cooperate with a suit of old clothes! It had no agents in the field; it rendered no Lib. 11.37; 12.127. financial accounts. Joshua Leavitt, who had been made its secretary, while continuing to edit the Emancipator, found that it had no vital or organizing power, and at the close of the year was obliged to seek his living elsewhere. It is not necessary, he said in his valedictory, to recount the causes which prevented an effective meeting [in New York] in May, nor those which have hindered the Society from going into operation in a way to obtain a general sympathy and support of abolitionists. One great cause, doubtless, is that the generality of those who are willing to work and to give are engaged in political action, and in carrying on the State and other local societies. Many think, in fact, there is not, just at present, any very essential service for which a central Board is needed. Lib. 11.193. So much for the American side of the Societ
ible: O Book of Books! though skepticism flout Lib. 11.179. Thy sacred origin, thy worth decry; Though transcendental This adjective was changed to ‘atheistic’ in the edition of Mr. Garrison's Sonnets and other poems, published in Boston in 1843 (p. 64), showing the liberalizing effect upon himself, unsuspected at the time, of those ‘memorable interviews and conversations, in the hall, in the lobbies, or around the doors,’ of which Emerson tells ( Lectures and Biographical Sketches, ed. iller, the head of the Second-Adventists, and so-called end-ofthe-world man, was at this epoch preaching in Massachusetts that the day of probation, preceding the millennium, was no further off than a date somewhere between the vernal equinoxes of 1843-44. he warns them to beware of those who abjure all stations of worldly trust and preferment; who insist that Christians cannot wield carnal weapons for the destruction of their enemies; who, when smitten on the one cheek, turn the other also to
both names should appear in the paper, but that Mrs. Child should have immediate charge, removing to New York, while her husband remained on his beet-sugar farm near Northampton, Mass. (Ms. Mar. 30, 31, 1841, J. S. Gibbons to W. L. G.). Rogers in July began to urge his very brother to make the Ms. July 16, 1841, Rogers to W. L. G. trip in question, then far from fashionable or well-known, or well-provided with houses of entertainment. Forgive me for writing so much, he concluded. You are thee publisher being unable to sustain it, the New Hampshire Society had to take the paper on their hands again. J. R. French and two other boys, as Quincy wrote to Collins, print it for nothing, asking only board and clothes. Ms. Jan. 30, 1841. In July, a frank review of the struggles of paper and editor, made Herald of Freedom, 7.82, Lib. 11.118. by Rogers in his own columns, showed that very little of his salary had reached him, that much was due him, and that he forgave much. On Sept. 7,
rld; and, in order suitably to affect the minds of those who listened to him, and to prepare them for the speedy coming of the Son of Man (an event, by the way, which we believe transpired eighteen Lib. 13.23, 27. hundred years ago), Father Miller, the head of the Second-Adventists, and so-called end-ofthe-world man, was at this epoch preaching in Massachusetts that the day of probation, preceding the millennium, was no further off than a date somewhere between the vernal equinoxes of 1843-44. he warns them to beware of those who abjure all stations of worldly trust and preferment; who insist that Christians cannot wield carnal weapons for the destruction of their enemies; who, when smitten on the one cheek, turn the other also to the smiter; and who are willing to die for their foes, as did Jesus for his, rather than to imprison, maim, or destroy them! The doctrines defended in the foregoing extracts continued, as heretofore, to be merely subsidiary to Mr. Garrison's lifework.
dential campaign, the schism in the American Society, and the Liberty-Party secession, was lamentably felt at the close of 1840, and Mr. Garrison had done what he could, by taking the field in person, to Ante, 2.428. supply the lack of a full corps of Fourierism—to reconcile individualism with association and organization. As Emerson notified Carlyle in the Oct. 30, 1840. previous autumn, We are all a little wild here with numberless projects of social reform. Not a reading man but has a drxecutive when New York surrendered the alleged fugitives from justice to Virginia, and its Legislature repealed the act of 1840 extending the right of trial by jury to citizens whose freedom was called in question by kidnappers or Southern slaveownered. After we separated, continues Mr. Garrison, in reference Ms. May 15, 1842, to E. Pease. to the arrangement of 1839-1840, I endeavored to stimulate Mr. Knapp to active exertions to retrieve his character, and promised to exert all my inf
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