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the vile that I have ever witnessed on any occasion or under any circumstances; venerable men, claiming to be holy men, the ambassadors of Jesus Christ, losing all self-respect and transforming themselves into the most unmannerly and violent spirits, merely on account of the sex of the individual who wished to address the assembly. On October 3, Mr. Garrison began a tour to the West Lib. 23.158. with special reference to Michigan. Cleveland was his first halting-place, for there, on the 6th, 7th, and 8th of the month, the fourth National Woman's Rights Convention was to be held. He served on the business committee and was among the speakers, the nine sessions passing off Hist. Woman Suffrage, 1.125, 136; Lib. 23.174, 182. with no sign of popular displeasure, though not without clerical disturbance. Joseph Barker, having maintained that the Bible was opposed to woman's rights and was therefore to be got rid of (Lib. 23: 174), was fallen foul of as an infidel and a renegade p
from inquiry to open opposition to Sabbatarianism. The Hartford Bible Convention gave public notice of his abandonment of the common view of the inspiration of the Scriptures in which he had been bred. This, though not the lowest possible stage of descent—for an Anti-Bible Convention or Society was conceivable—was practically to touch bottom, and left nothing to be desired by his clerical detractors. The first quarter of the year had been spent in and about Boston, but by the middle of April Mr. Garrison began his labors in the more distant fields. An antislavery convention had been called in Cincinnati for April 19, 1853, by the women of that city, and he was invited to attend. The scene was new to him, and he Ms. Apr. 18, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G.; ante, p. 207. could visit on the way the friends in Cleveland to whom he had owed his life in 1847. On the day appointed he stood on the banks of the Ohio, and beheld for the first time the slave-cursed soil of Kentucky. For h
Lib. 23.129. under the management of the New York City Anti-Slavery Society, This organization was consequent upon the transfer of Oliver Johnson from the editorship of the Pennsylvania Freeman to the associate editorship (with S. H. Gay) of the National Anti-Slavery Standard (Lib. 23: 47, 50, [78], 107). broke for a moment Mr. Garrison's summer rest. By the end of the same month, he was on his way to New York to share in an extraordinary series of meetings crowded into a single week. In May a so-called World's Temperance Convention had been held in that city, under the customary clerical auspices, and, though Lib. 23:[84]; Hist. Woman Suffrage, 1.499. consenting at first to admit certificated delegates from the Women's State Temperance Society, was convulsed by a motion to place one of them on the business committee. A hearing was refused to the women themselves, and they were finally excluded, as not contemplated in the call. A secession accordingly took place, led by the Re
ity, as it can be on moral and religious principle. Lib. 23.70. The Western tour was to have been prolonged to Michigan, but a sharp pleuritic attack confined Mr. Garrison to his bed and made return imperative—to the great disappointment of those who were expecting him at Lib. 23.75. Adrian. Not more than a fortnight's rest, however, was allowed him in Boston, for the American Anti-Slavery Society was to hold its anniversary once more in New York city. In the interval, he attended on May 5 a dinner given in Boston by the Free Democracy to John P. Hale, Lib. 23.74. whose Senatorial term had expired and his place been filled by Charles G. Atherton, of gag memory. Mr.Ante, 2.247-249. Hale's political attitude towards slavery, under the compromises of the Constitution, certainly had not been acceptable to the abolitionists; but his solitary courage amid a contemptuous and murderous pro-slavery body like the Senate of the United States deserved, and had always received, recogniti
So it appeared. Douglass, too, was there, but where was his halfbrother Ante, p. 294.? Dr. Furness's place was supplied by Henry Ward Beecher, who made his first speech on an abolition Lib. 23:[82]. platform, not in complete sympathy, yet confessing that he would choose dismemberment and liberty, sooner than Union and slavery. The best-considered and most effective speech of Mr. Garrison's during the year was that delivered at the New Lib. 23:[87], 93. England Convention in Boston on May 26. It expounded the constitution and philosophy of the anti-slavery movement, proved its catholicity, and vindicated the criticism meted out on its platform to all who took their stand on it. In form, scope, and strictness of reasoning it was a classical production. But we must pass it by, for the Bible Convention is only a week off. In the Liberator of April 22, 1853, appeared a call to Lib. 23.63. the friends of free discussion, without distinction of sex, color, sect, or party, to mee
on and philosophy of the anti-slavery movement, proved its catholicity, and vindicated the criticism meted out on its platform to all who took their stand on it. In form, scope, and strictness of reasoning it was a classical production. But we must pass it by, for the Bible Convention is only a week off. In the Liberator of April 22, 1853, appeared a call to Lib. 23.63. the friends of free discussion, without distinction of sex, color, sect, or party, to meet at Hartford, Conn., on Thursday, June 2, to Sunday, June 5, for the purpose of freely and fully canvassing the origin, authority, and influence of the Jewish and Christian Scriptures. It was signed by Andrew Jackson Davis, William Green, Jr., and William P. Donaldson. Mr. Green we have already met at the founding of the American Anti-Slavery Ante, 1.398, 401, 415. Society. Mr. Davis was definable in a single word as a seer, or prophet, possessed of clairvoyant powers, Procuring a lock of Mr. Garrison's rather scanty sup
the anti-slavery movement, proved its catholicity, and vindicated the criticism meted out on its platform to all who took their stand on it. In form, scope, and strictness of reasoning it was a classical production. But we must pass it by, for the Bible Convention is only a week off. In the Liberator of April 22, 1853, appeared a call to Lib. 23.63. the friends of free discussion, without distinction of sex, color, sect, or party, to meet at Hartford, Conn., on Thursday, June 2, to Sunday, June 5, for the purpose of freely and fully canvassing the origin, authority, and influence of the Jewish and Christian Scriptures. It was signed by Andrew Jackson Davis, William Green, Jr., and William P. Donaldson. Mr. Green we have already met at the founding of the American Anti-Slavery Ante, 1.398, 401, 415. Society. Mr. Davis was definable in a single word as a seer, or prophet, possessed of clairvoyant powers, Procuring a lock of Mr. Garrison's rather scanty supply of hair, Mr. Dav
read the outpourings of the press, both secular and religious, on the Infidel Convention, as grouped in the Liberator. The mob, as usual, found Lib. 23.96. there its justification; and frightened editors even talked Lib. 23.95. of securing legislative prohibition of such gatherings in the State of Connecticut, in view of the announcement Proceedings Hartford Bible Convention, p. 371. that another Bible Convention would be held in January, 1854. An excursion to Flushing, Long Island, in August, to take part in the celebration of West India emancipation Aug. 4, 1853; Lib. 23.129. under the management of the New York City Anti-Slavery Society, This organization was consequent upon the transfer of Oliver Johnson from the editorship of the Pennsylvania Freeman to the associate editorship (with S. H. Gay) of the National Anti-Slavery Standard (Lib. 23: 47, 50, [78], 107). broke for a moment Mr. Garrison's summer rest. By the end of the same month, he was on his way to New York to
visible, and no dignitaries. On the next evening (Saturday), he witnessed the Sept. 3. performance of Uncle Tom's Cabin at the National Theatre. On Sunday morning, he listened to a sermon delivered to a Sept. 4. great audience in Metropolitan Hall by Miss Antoinette Lib. 23.146. L. Brown. A graduate of Oberlin. She was short. But we are all in fine spirits, wrote Mr. Garrison to his wife. The Ms. Sept. 5. programme for Monday was a meeting at the Tabernacle in Sept. 5. aid of theSept. 5. aid of the Women's State Temperance Society; for Lib. 23.146. Tuesday and Wednesday, a Woman's Rights Convention in Sept. 6, 7. the Tabernacle, parallel with the bastard WorlSept. 6, 7. the Tabernacle, parallel with the bastard World's Hist. Woman Suffrage, 1.564. Temperance Convention at Metropolitan Hall. The woman's rights movement, an outgrowth of the anti-slavery agitation, now first bellowing correspondence will be found instructive. Mrs. Stowe had returned in September from Sept. 18, 1853; Lib. 23.151. her foreign tour, during which, if she had
September 1st (search for this): chapter 13
rtificated delegates from the Women's State Temperance Society, was convulsed by a motion to place one of them on the business committee. A hearing was refused to the women themselves, and they were finally excluded, as not contemplated in the call. A secession accordingly took place, led by the Rev. T. W. Higginson of Worcester, Mass. A fall meeting having been arranged for the same misnamed Convention, on September 6, 7, a counter Whole World's Temperance Convention was projected for September 1, 2, and Mr. Garrison was naturally among the signers of Lib. 23.115. the latter call. He took a very subordinate part in the Ms. Sept. 5, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G.; Lib. 23.146. proceedings, in which the women were of right conspicuous. Few of the clergy were visible, and no dignitaries. On the next evening (Saturday), he witnessed the Sept. 3. performance of Uncle Tom's Cabin at the National Theatre. On Sunday morning, he listened to a sermon delivered to a Sept. 4. great audie
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