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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
father of lies. Most of the proprietors and editors more richly deserve a place in the penitentiary than many of its inmates; for they sin as with a cartrope, and on the largest and most comprehensive scale. It is a terrible sign of general corruption. To pass the time, on Sunday, October 16, Mr. Garrison Ms. Oct. 17, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G. crossed the Detroit River, and first set foot on Canadian soil at Windsor—a fit place, as it was largely populated by fugitives from the United States. He walked also to the neighboring Sandwich, likewise a place of refuge from American tyranny, and saw the barracks (formerly occupied by British soldiers) which, winter before last, were opened to shelter the crowd of fugitive slaves then hastening to that spot, to prevent them from perishing. Returning to Detroit, he addressed the colored citizens in the evening in one of their three churches, the Methodist, and was warmly received. Adrian was revisited on account of the State Ant
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ound of political economy and material prosperity, as it can be on moral and religious principle. Lib. 23.70. The Western tour was to have been prolonged to Michigan, but a sharp pleuritic attack confined Mr. Garrison to his bed and made return imperative—to the great disappointment of those who were expecting him at Lib. 23 of the sex of the individual who wished to address the assembly. On October 3, Mr. Garrison began a tour to the West Lib. 23.158. with special reference to Michigan. Cleveland was his first halting-place, for there, on the 6th, 7th, and 8th of the month, the fourth National Woman's Rights Convention was to be held. He servriends after the style of Bennett's Herald. On November 9, 1853, Mrs. Foster wrote from Plymouth, Mich., to Samuel May, Jr. (Ms.): We are doing over again, in Michigan, what we did nearly fifteen years ago in New England, and eight years ago in Ohio— fighting New Organization, here under the cover of Free Democracy. We little
Adrian (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ble affair (Lib. 23: 178, 182). The first of seven resolutions from his pen read as follows: Resolved, That the natural rights of one human being are Hist, Woman Suffrage, 1.818. those of every other, in all cases equally sacred and inalienable; hence the boasted Rights of man, about which we hear so much, are simply the Rights of Woman, of which we hear so little; or, in other words, they are the Rights of Humanity, neither affected by, nor dependent upon, sex or condition. Adrian, Michigan, was reached on October 8. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Adrian, October 10, 1853. Ms.; Lib. 23.190. At the depot here, I found waiting for us Viz., W. L. G., and Marius R. Robinson, editor of the Anti-Slavery Bugle (Lib. 23: 190). with his team Thomas Chandler, the brother of the lamented Elizabeth M. Ante, 1.145. Chandler, who took us to his home, about five miles from this city. . . . I was received with all the cordiality of Western hospitality. Yesterday (Sunday),
Battle Creek (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ith her travelling companion, Miss Putnam. She has been laboring with great Caroline F. Putnam. success in Detroit and other places, and will probably be induced to remain in the State a short time longer. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Battle Creek, October 15, 1853. Ms.; Lib. 23.190. On Tuesday last, I spent the day (with Mr. Robinson of the Oct. 11. Bugle, Sallie Holley, and Caroline Putnam) at Thomas Chandler's. . . . I spent an hour alone at the grave of Elizabeth (the remains old four or five meetings in the City Hall, which were well attended, and which created a good deal of excitement and discussion. They are acting, in various places, as my forerunners; and, by their solicitation, I came this long distance from Battle Creek (about 140 miles) on Saturday, with my Oct. 15. friend Marius R. Robinson,—they having left a few days previous,—thinking I should find all the necessary arrangements made for my lecturing on Sunday afternoon and evening. But, lo! on our ar
Quaker (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
hema. The wearing of the Bloomer costume by some of the advocates of the cause furnished a ready occasion for this sort of opposition. The same journals, religious and secular, that nursed the mob spirit for the suppression of abolitionism, provoked and fanned Hist Woman Suffrage, 1.546, 547. it for the Woman's Rights Convention at the Tabernacle in this first week of September, 1853. Mrs. Mott presided, and lent to the occasion all the defence that purity of life and charm of person and Quaker dignity could contribute; but in vain. The overruling of the rights of the promoters Lib. 23.148; Hist. Woman Suffrage, 1.547-577. of the Convention and of the vast majority of the audience was unchecked, especially in the evening, although the police made a show of preserving order. Mr. Garrison appears to have spoken twice and to have been heard. Ibid., 1.548, 570. The land, he said, is beginning to be convulsed. The Ibid., 1.549. opposition to the movement is assuming a mal
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Convention.—1853. Garrison revisits the West, and attends a large number of conventions; in particular, that at Hartford, Conn., to discuss the authority of the Scriptures, called by Andrew Jackson Davis, and mobbed by divinity students. His ra call to Lib. 23.63. the friends of free discussion, without distinction of sex, color, sect, or party, to meet at Hartford, Conn., on Thursday, June 2, to Sunday, June 5, for the purpose of freely and fully canvassing the origin, authority, and ie Lib. 22.174, 183; Ms. Dec. 21, 1852, Barker to W. L. G. meetings had been crowded, with just enough opposition. At Hartford, likewise, there was a very full attendance, but the opposition was certainly excessive. Not that the clergy of the cit like order was restored. And this was the best defence of the plenary inspiration of the Bible that pious, evangelical Hartford had to make on the occasion! After the adjournment, the theological ruffians (some of them the sons of Southern men-ste
Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
England. Once settled, he identified himself with the abolitionists, writing copiously for the J. Barker to W. L. G.; ante, p. 174. Liberator, and finding there admission (which Edmund Quincy denied to it in the Liberty Bell) for an article Lib. 22.80; Ms. Jan. 13, 1853, E. Quincy to R. D. Webb. showing that; since the Bible sanctioned slavery, the book must be demolished as a condition precedent to emancipation. In November, 1852, he had been prime mover in a Bible Convention held at Salem, Ohio, Nov. 27-29. concerning which he reported to Mr. Garrison that the Lib. 22.174, 183; Ms. Dec. 21, 1852, Barker to W. L. G. meetings had been crowded, with just enough opposition. At Hartford, likewise, there was a very full attendance, but the opposition was certainly excessive. Not that the clergy of the city appeared in force to deprecate the proposed examination of the Bible, or to maintain its divine origin and authority. With a single exception, they held entirely aloof. The
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
tion of such gatherings in the State of Connecticut, in view of the announcement Proceedings Hartford Bible Convention, p. 371. that another Bible Convention would be held in January, 1854. An excursion to Flushing, Long Island, in August, to take part in the celebration of West India emancipation Aug. 4, 1853; Lib. 23.129. under the management of the New York City Anti-Slavery Society, This organization was consequent upon the transfer of Oliver Johnson from the editorship of the Pennsylvania Freeman to the associate editorship (with S. H. Gay) of the National Anti-Slavery Standard (Lib. 23: 47, 50, [78], 107). broke for a moment Mr. Garrison's summer rest. By the end of the same month, he was on his way to New York to share in an extraordinary series of meetings crowded into a single week. In May a so-called World's Temperance Convention had been held in that city, under the customary clerical auspices, and, though Lib. 23:[84]; Hist. Woman Suffrage, 1.499. consenting at f
Canadian (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
. Everywhere the press in this country is as foul as the gutter, and as unprincipled as the father of lies. Most of the proprietors and editors more richly deserve a place in the penitentiary than many of its inmates; for they sin as with a cartrope, and on the largest and most comprehensive scale. It is a terrible sign of general corruption. To pass the time, on Sunday, October 16, Mr. Garrison Ms. Oct. 17, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G. crossed the Detroit River, and first set foot on Canadian soil at Windsor—a fit place, as it was largely populated by fugitives from the United States. He walked also to the neighboring Sandwich, likewise a place of refuge from American tyranny, and saw the barracks (formerly occupied by British soldiers) which, winter before last, were opened to shelter the crowd of fugitive slaves then hastening to that spot, to prevent them from perishing. Returning to Detroit, he addressed the colored citizens in the evening in one of their three churches,
Brooklyn (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
1852, Barker to W. L. G. meetings had been crowded, with just enough opposition. At Hartford, likewise, there was a very full attendance, but the opposition was certainly excessive. Not that the clergy of the city appeared in force to deprecate the proposed examination of the Bible, or to maintain its divine origin and authority. With a single exception, they held entirely aloof. The Rev. Joseph Turner, a local Second-Adventist preacher, and the Rev. George Storrs of Ante, 2.67. Brooklyn, N. Y., belonging to the same despised denomination, Lib. 23.90. alone had the courage of their opinions and stood up for the inspiration of the Bible. They were (considering merely their adversaries) very unequal to the task, yet they served as rallying-points to the disorderly elements in the galleries —notably the divinity students from the adjacent Trinity College. These, as Mr. Garrison testified— attempted to break up the meeting by stamping, shouting, Lib. 23.90. yelling, groa
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