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m sadly ashamed of many things which I send out simply because I have not strength to copy them. Harriet Beecher Stowe to W. L. Garrison. [Andover], Cabin, December 12, 1853. Ms. On one point I confess myself to be puzzled. Why are Wright, etc., so sensitive to the use of the term infidel? If Henry C. Wright. I understand H. Wright's letters in the Liberator, he openly professes to be what is called commonly an infidel. Names are given for conveniencea sake—such as Unitarian, Baptist, Universalist, Infidel. They mark the belief of the individual. If H. Wright is not an infidel, what is he? I inquire honestly, for if anybody had asked me if he was one, I should have answered yes without a moment's hesitation, in the same manner as I should have said that May was a Unitarian. . . . S. J. May. I find the following numbers missing from the Liberator of this year, and should like to have them sent me: 27, 28, 29, 30, 39, 41, 49. Harriet Beecher Stowe to W. L. Garr
George W. Benson (search for this): chapter 13
ose remains were lying beneath the sod. They are buried on a rising elevation in a large wheat field, which is seen conspicuously at a considerable distance—half a dozen young and thrifty oak trees standing in a row on one side of the enclosure. To me it was hallowed ground, and, while standing there, I renewed my pledge of fidelity to the cause of the enslaved while life continues. Thomas reminds me somewhat of dear brother George. His heart was well-nigh buried in Elizabeth's grave, G. W. Benson. and his reverence for her memory carries an air of solemnity about it, as though she had been an angelic visitant from another sphere. . . . This afternoon I leave for Detroit, where I am to speak to-morrow afternoon and evening. There is a good deal of excitement in that place, caused by the recent meetings held there by S. S. and Abby K. Foster. The Detroit papers are full of pro-slavery slang, especially the Free Soil paper, which Free Democrat. has assailed our friends after th
permanent leave of his native England, having purchased a farm in Ohio and removed thither with his Lib. 23.11. family. On his preliminary visit to this country he had received from Mr. Garrison in Boston attentions like those Ms. Albany, Apr. 19, 1851. he had bestowed in England. Once settled, he identified himself with the abolitionists, writing copiously for the J. Barker to W. L. G.; ante, p. 174. Liberator, and finding there admission (which Edmund Quincy denied to it in the Liberty Bell) for an article Lib. 22.80; Ms. Jan. 13, 1853, E. Quincy to R. D. Webb. showing that; since the Bible sanctioned slavery, the book must be demolished as a condition precedent to emancipation. In November, 1852, he had been prime mover in a Bible Convention held at Salem, Ohio, Nov. 27-29. concerning which he reported to Mr. Garrison that the Lib. 22.174, 183; Ms. Dec. 21, 1852, Barker to W. L. G. meetings had been crowded, with just enough opposition. At Hartford, likewise, there was a
e, about five miles from this city. . . . I was received with all the cordiality of Western hospitality. Yesterday (Sunday), we had two meetings in a commodious Oct. 9. hall capable of holding nearly a thousand persons. It was crowded most densely, and many could find no entrance. Over the platform was placed the name of Garrrt time longer. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Battle Creek, October 15, 1853. Ms.; Lib. 23.190. On Tuesday last, I spent the day (with Mr. Robinson of the Oct. 11. Bugle, Sallie Holley, and Caroline Putnam) at Thomas Chandler's. . . . I spent an hour alone at the grave of Elizabeth (the remains of her aunt lying beside they are acting, in various places, as my forerunners; and, by their solicitation, I came this long distance from Battle Creek (about 140 miles) on Saturday, with my Oct. 15. friend Marius R. Robinson,—they having left a few days previous,—thinking I should find all the necessary arrangements made for my lecturing on Sunday afternoo
John P. Hale (search for this): chapter 13
ity. In the interval, he attended on May 5 a dinner given in Boston by the Free Democracy to John P. Hale, Lib. 23.74. whose Senatorial term had expired and his place been filled by Charles G. Atherton, of gag memory. Mr.Ante, 2.247-249. Hale's political attitude towards slavery, under the compromises of the Constitution, certainly had not been acceptable to the abolitionists; but his solitary there were loud calls for Garrison, who responded with peculiar felicity, paying just tributes to Hale and to Lib. 23.74. Clay, The first meeting of Garrison and C. M. Clay, whenever it took placemeasures to be adopted, or the precise position to be occupied, one thing is true here—we are all Hale fellows' (enthusiastic applause); and, what is better still, Hale fellows well met. (Continued Hale fellows well met. (Continued cheers.) It is not often that antislavery men are in a majority. (Applause.) I believe we have it all our own way here this evening. It is not possible that there can be a single pro-slavery man or
Marius R. Robinson (search for this): chapter 13
ber 8. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Adrian, October 10, 1853. Ms.; Lib. 23.190. At the depot here, I found waiting for us Viz., W. L. G., and Marius R. Robinson, editor of the Anti-Slavery Bugle (Lib. 23: 190). with his team Thomas Chandler, the brother of the lamented Elizabeth M. Ante, 1.145. Chandler, who took u the State a short time longer. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Battle Creek, October 15, 1853. Ms.; Lib. 23.190. On Tuesday last, I spent the day (with Mr. Robinson of the Oct. 11. Bugle, Sallie Holley, and Caroline Putnam) at Thomas Chandler's. . . . I spent an hour alone at the grave of Elizabeth (the remains of her auns places, as my forerunners; and, by their solicitation, I came this long distance from Battle Creek (about 140 miles) on Saturday, with my Oct. 15. friend Marius R. Robinson,—they having left a few days previous,—thinking I should find all the necessary arrangements made for my lecturing on Sunday afternoon and evening. But, lo
for if anybody had asked me if he was one, I should have answered yes without a moment's hesitation, in the same manner as I should have said that May was a Unitarian. . . . S. J. May. I find the following numbers missing from the Liberator of this year, and should like to have them sent me: 27, 28, 29, 30, 39, 41, 49. Harriet Beecher Stowe to W. L. Garrison. [Andover, December, 1853 (?).] Ms. no date. I see you have published your letter to me in the Liberator. I Lib. 23.202, Dec. 23, 1853. did not reply to that letter immediately because I did not wish to speak on so important a subject unadvisedly and without proper thought and reflection. The course I pursued was to make up my file of the Liberator, and give it a general investigation as to its drift and course of thought for the past summer. I have also read through with attention Theodore Parker's works on religion, which I suppose give me somewhat of a fair view of the modern form of what people have generally
Leah Brown (search for this): chapter 13
Lib. 23.115. the latter call. He took a very subordinate part in the Ms. Sept. 5, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G.; Lib. 23.146. proceedings, in which the women were of right conspicuous. Few of the clergy were visible, and no dignitaries. On the next evening (Saturday), he witnessed the Sept. 3. performance of Uncle Tom's Cabin at the National Theatre. On Sunday morning, he listened to a sermon delivered to a Sept. 4. great audience in Metropolitan Hall by Miss Antoinette Lib. 23.146. L. Brown. A graduate of Oberlin. She was shortly ordained pastor of the Congregational Church at South Butler, N. Y. (Lib. 23: 151). In the afternoon, he spoke in the same place Lib. 23.142, 146. before the New York City Anti-Slavery Society, and attended without addressing the evening meeting, towards the close of which, during the speeches of Lucy Stone, who never acquitted herself better, and Lucretia Mott, the rowdyism led by the redoubtable Rynders became so rampant that the session was cu
Andrew Jackson Davis (search for this): chapter 13
mber of conventions; in particular, that at Hartford, Conn., to discuss the authority of the Scriptures, called by Andrew Jackson Davis, and mobbed by divinity students. His reputation among sectarians on both sides of the Atlantic suffers a still fnd fully canvassing the origin, authority, and influence of the Jewish and Christian Scriptures. It was signed by Andrew Jackson Davis, William Green, Jr., and William P. Donaldson. Mr. Green we have already met at the founding of the American Anti-Slavery Ante, 1.398, 401, 415. Society. Mr. Davis was definable in a single word as a seer, or prophet, possessed of clairvoyant powers, Procuring a lock of Mr. Garrison's rather scanty supply of hair, Mr. Davis evolved the psychometry of his nMr. Davis evolved the psychometry of his new friend with a degree of success in characterization worth noticing (Lib. 23: 139). and sometimes styled the Great Harmonian, in allusion to Lib. 23.96. the principal work embodying his philosophy. He was commonly classed among Spiritualists, th
John C. Calhoun (search for this): chapter 13
and feathers! What a glorious Union it is that we are enjoying! How worthy of preservation! Alas! the Union is but another name for the iron reign of the Slave Power. We have no common country, as yet. God grant we may have! We have no common Union, as yet. God grant we may have! We shall have it when the jubilee comes—and not till then. The American Anti-Slavery Society met in New York Lib. 23:[78], 81. city at the Chinese Assembly Room on May 11, 1853, amid the utmost quiet. Calhoun, and Clay, and Webster had, as Mr. Garrison pointed out, been translated since 1850. Lib. 23.81. Was there no one to give the signal to Rynders to save the Union once more by mobbing the abolitionists away for another term of years? Could Mr. Garrison, unchecked, mention as signs of progress the blotting out of those pillars of the Slave Power, the Jerry rescue, the armed stand against the Fugitive Slave Law at Christiana, the success of Uncle Tom's Cabin? So it appeared. Douglass, too,
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