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Balaklava (Ukraine) (search for this): chapter 2
beach, and did actually die, without any medical assistance whatever. When the hospital was about to be established at Balaklava, some days after, sick men were sent thither before the slightest preparation for them had been made, and many of them any miserable weeks, it was all that the commissary officers could do to keep the army alive. As for the port itself,--Balaklava,it was such a scene of filth and horror as the earth has seldom exhibited. Indeed, it was said, at the time, that all nuary the 25th the surgeon of a ship, appointed to convey the sick to the general hospital at Scutari, went on shore at Balaklava and applied to an officer in charge of stores for two or three stoves to put on board his ship to warm the sick and dyi duty. They came none too soon. In a few hours wounded men in great numbers began to be brought in from the action of Balaklava, and, ere long, thousands more arrived from the bloody field of Inkermann. Fortunately, the Times commissioner was pre
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 2
en. They travelled through France to Marseilles. On their journey the ladies were treated with more than the usual politeness of Frenchmen; the inn-keepers and even the servants would not take payment for their accommodation, and all ranks of people appeared to be in most cordial sympathy with their mission. Among other compliments paid Miss Nightingale by the press, one of the newspapers informed the public that her dress was charming, and that she was almost as graceful as the ladies of Paris. From Marseilles they were conveyed in a steamer to Scutari, where the principal hospitals were placed, which they reached on the 5th of November. In all the town, crowded with misery in every form, there were but five unoccupied rooms, which had been reserved for wounded officers of high rank; these were assigned to the nurses, and they at once entered upon the performance of their duty. They came none too soon. In a few hours wounded men in great numbers began to be brought in from t
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 2
to its finances; she increased the number of its friends; she improved the arrangements of the interior; and when her health gave way under the excessive labors of her position, and she was compelled to retire to the country, she had the satisfaction of leaving the institution firmly established and well regulated. But the time was at hand when her talents were to be employed upon a grander scale, and when her country was to reap the full result of her study and observation. The war with Russia occurred. In February and March, 1854, ship-loads of troops were leaving England for the seat of war, and the heart of England went with them. In all the melancholy history of warlike expeditions, there is no record of one which was managed with such cruel inefficiency as this. Everything like foresight, the adaptation of means to ends, knowledge of the climate, knowledge of the human constitution, seemed utterly wanting in those who had charge of sending these twenty-five thousand Brit
Marseilles (France) (search for this): chapter 2
24th, 1854, Florence Nightingale, accompanied by a clerical friend and his wife, and by a corps of thirty-seven nurses, left England for the Crimea, followed by the benedictions of millions of their countrymen. They travelled through France to Marseilles. On their journey the ladies were treated with more than the usual politeness of Frenchmen; the inn-keepers and even the servants would not take payment for their accommodation, and all ranks of people appeared to be in most cordial sympathy with their mission. Among other compliments paid Miss Nightingale by the press, one of the newspapers informed the public that her dress was charming, and that she was almost as graceful as the ladies of Paris. From Marseilles they were conveyed in a steamer to Scutari, where the principal hospitals were placed, which they reached on the 5th of November. In all the town, crowded with misery in every form, there were but five unoccupied rooms, which had been reserved for wounded officers of h
Balmoral (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ousand pounds were raised, almost without an effort, and it was concluded at length, to employ this fund in enabling Miss Nightingale to establish an institution for the training of nurses. She sanctioned and accepted this trust, and has been chiefly employed ever since in labors connected with it. The Sultan of Turkey sent her a magnificent bracelet. The Queen of England gave her a cross beautifully formed, and blazing with gems. The queen invited her also to visit her in her retreat at Balmoral, and Miss Nightingale spent some days there, receiving the homage of the royal family. Not the least service which this noble lady has rendered the suffering sons of men has been the publication of the work just referred to, entitled Notes on nursing; what it is, and what it is not, --one of the very few little books of which it can be truly said that a copy ought to be in every house. In this work she gives the world, in a lively, vigorous manner, the substance of all that knowledge of
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
spirit, and has been able to do for love what money could neither procure nor reward. The felicity of both her names, Florence and Nightingale, has often been remarked; and it appears that she owes both of them to accident. Her father is William me of Nightingale. It so happened that she first saw the light while the family were residing at the beautiful city of Florence, and to this fact she is indebted for her first name. The family consists of but four members, father, mother, and the two daughters, Parthenope and Florence. The date of the birth of the younger sister, Florence, is variously given in the slight accounts which have been published of her life; but it was said in the public prints, at the time when her name was on evFlorence, is variously given in the slight accounts which have been published of her life; but it was said in the public prints, at the time when her name was on every tongue, that she was born in the same year as Queen Victoria, which was 1819. Her father is a well-informed and intelligent man, and it was under his guidance that she attained a considerable proficiency in the Latin language and in mathematic
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
d to other vessels. Many deaths occurred during the process of removal. On the same day men were dying on the beach, and did actually die, without any medical assistance whatever. When the hospital was about to be established at Balaklava, some days after, sick men were sent thither before the slightest preparation for them had been made, and many of them remained in the open street for several hours in the rain. Winter came on,--such a winter as we are accustomed to in and near the city of New York. It began with that terrible hurricane, which many doubtless remember reading of at the time. The whole army were still living in tents. No adequate preparation had been made, of any kind, for protecting the troops against such snows, and cold, and rain, as they were certain to experience. This hurricane broke upon the camp early in the morning of November the fourteenth, an hour before daylight, the wind bringing with it torrents of rain. The air was filled with blankets, coats,
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
nd, fundamental position, the curative power of fresh, pure air. Disease, she remarks, is not an evil, but a blessing; it is a reparative process,--an effort of nature to get rid of something hostile to life. That being the case, it is of the first importance to remove what she considers the chief cause of disease,--the inhaling of poisonous air. She laughs to .scorn the impious cant, so often employed to console bereaved parents, that the death of children is a mysterious dispensation of Providence. No such thing. Children perish, she tells us, because they are packed into unventilated school-rooms, and sleep at night in unventilated dormitories. An extraordinary fallacy, she says, is the dread of night air. What air can we breathe at night but night air? The choice is between pure night air from without and foul night air from within. Most people prefer the latter. An unaccountable choice! An open window, most nights in the year, can never hurt any one. Better, she remarks
France (France) (search for this): chapter 2
ome. The family connection of the Nightingales in England is numerous, and she had friends enough for all the purposes of life among her own relations. About 1845, in company with her parents and sister, she made an extensive tour in Germany, France, and Italy, visiting everywhere the hospitals, infirmaries, and asylums, and watching closely the modes of treatment practised in them. The family continued their journey into Egypt, where they resided — for a considerable time, and where the giOctober the 24th, 1854, Florence Nightingale, accompanied by a clerical friend and his wife, and by a corps of thirty-seven nurses, left England for the Crimea, followed by the benedictions of millions of their countrymen. They travelled through France to Marseilles. On their journey the ladies were treated with more than the usual politeness of Frenchmen; the inn-keepers and even the servants would not take payment for their accommodation, and all ranks of people appeared to be in most cordia
Dublin (Irish Republic) (search for this): chapter 2
le as it now seems, the arrival of these ladies was far from being welcomed either by the medical or military officers, and it required all the firmness and tact of a Florence Nightingale to overcome the obstacles which were placed or left in her way. Several weeks passed before the hospital authorities cordially co-operated with her. Still more incredible is it, that some cruel bigots in England severely criticised her conduct in accepting the services of some of the Sisters of Charity from Dublin. There was much discussion as to whether she was herself a Catholic or a Protestant; which led a witty clergyman to remark: She belongs to a sect which unfortunately is a very rare one,--the sect of the Good Samaritans. One of the chaplains who labored with her, added. with reference to another charge equally heartless and absurd: If there is any blame in looking for a Roman Catholic priest to attend a dying Catholic,--let me share it with her, for I did it again and again. The same e
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