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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen. Search the whole document.

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San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
the great masters. In her childlike devotion to the genius of Beethoven, Chopin, and Mendelssohn, she reminds one of Hilda, the girl-artist of Hawthorne's Marble Faun, whose life was spent in study of Raphael and Michael Angelo. It is better, thinks this earnest woman, to render vocal the great conceptions of the past, than to win a cheap reputation by fleeting musical mediocrities. Her remarkable memory retains all the music she plays, the orchestral parts as well as her own. Madame Urso's stay in this country is now uncertain. Her latest performances have been in the New England cities, and in New York. She has accepted an engagement in California, and will probably leave for San Francisco in July. Her ardent desire is to return to Paris, and make that city her home. If she leaves us, it will be with the possibility of coming again to America, at some time in the distant future. She will take with her a thousand good wishes, and leave behind her memories of delight.
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
the great masters. In her childlike devotion to the genius of Beethoven, Chopin, and Mendelssohn, she reminds one of Hilda, the girl-artist of Hawthorne's Marble Faun, whose life was spent in study of Raphael and Michael Angelo. It is better, thinks this earnest woman, to render vocal the great conceptions of the past, than to win a cheap reputation by fleeting musical mediocrities. Her remarkable memory retains all the music she plays, the orchestral parts as well as her own. Madame Urso's stay in this country is now uncertain. Her latest performances have been in the New England cities, and in New York. She has accepted an engagement in California, and will probably leave for San Francisco in July. Her ardent desire is to return to Paris, and make that city her home. If she leaves us, it will be with the possibility of coming again to America, at some time in the distant future. She will take with her a thousand good wishes, and leave behind her memories of delight.
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 22
of bouquets. Soon after this Signor Urso went to Paris, resigning his position at Nantes for the purpose ofn of red coral. From these triumphs she returned to Paris and her studies with Massart. In a few months she appeared at the public concerts of Paris, at the Salle Herz, the Societe Polytechnique, the Conservatoire, and National Conservatory of music and of declamation. Paris, August 12, 1852. Mademoiselle Camilla Urso is a as obtained brilliant success in several concerts in Paris, and above all at the Conservatory, where the jury ht. Reaching Liverpool she prepared at once to go to Paris,--her home for some years, and the scene of some of chestra was then performing in the Cirque Napoleon. Paris, with all its superb theatres has no large music hacasion was a Fantasie-Caprice of Vieuxtemps. From Paris she went to Arras, Boulogne, Valenciennes, and Cambrrancisco in July. Her ardent desire is to return to Paris, and make that city her home. If she leaves us, it
Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 22
a diamond of great value. On one side of the watch was engraved,-- Camilla Urso. From her Boston friends. Nov. 8th, 1863. The gift was enclosed in a velvet box, bearing upon the cover her initials in gold within a laurel wreath. Engagements now crowded upon her, and she visited in succession most of the cities that had known her as a child, spending much time in Boston, New York, and Chicago. In 1864 she went to Europe, sailing in the China, on the 26th of August. Reaching Liverpool she prepared at once to go to Paris,--her home for some years, and the scene of some of her earliest triumphs. She was wonderfully successful in this centre of art, and became the lioness of the saloons. Pasdeloup's monster orchestra was then performing in the Cirque Napoleon. Paris, with all its superb theatres has no large music hall. Camilla Urso was invited to play with this orchestra, and played, at one of their concerts, Mendelssohn's great concerto. The minister of fine ar
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 22
fused to appear at concerts, and seemed to lose all animation and vivacity. A change of scene was at last imperatively necessary, and she went with her father to Canada in 1856. This trip was very successful, though not entirely professional. She travelled through the country, giving some concerts, and winning admiration fromallant marines showed her a hundred graceful attentions, presented her with bouquets, and she, in return, bewitched them with the music of her violin. While in Canada she met with a serious loss. Her collection of presents, containing a magnificent bracelet presented by the Germania Society; her cross of pearls with its chain f Washington's birthday, some one entered and possessed himself of her jewels. Search was unavailing, nothing was ever again heard of them. On her return from Canada her mother met her in New York. The joy of mother and daughter, reunited after so long a separation, may easily be imagined. They spent some time together, and
Nantes (France) (search for this): chapter 22
sonorous thing of wood! The brain and heart of a true violinist came into the world one summer-day in the city of Nantes, France. This beautiful old Huguenot city was then the residence of Salvator Urso, a musician from Palermo, Sicily, and his widow, whose husband had been one of Signor Urso's friends. The announcement of the concert astonished the citizens of Nantes. It was considered the height of absurdity for a child to attempt to play on so difficult an instrument. Friends came t she had ever put on, were much more engrossing for the time than the violin she was to handle. The principal journal of Nantes spoke thus of the performance:-- Never had violinist a pose more exact, firmer, and at the same time perfectly easy;nd by salvos of bravos and a shower of bouquets. Soon after this Signor Urso went to Paris, resigning his position at Nantes for the purpose of giving the most thorough musical education to the daughter of whose genius he was so proud. He propos
Heidelberg (Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 22
she placed one foot in a saucer while playing. Fear of breaking the dish was a sufficient motive to keep her feet motionless; and to this simple contrivance we are indebted, in part, for Madame Urso's wonderful accuracy and agreeable repose of manner. The years of training were interrupted by a series of concerts in the departments and a three months tour hi Germany. This was a special indulgence, as pupils of the Conservatoire are not allowed to play in public. Camilla performed at Heidelberg, Baden-Baden, and Mayence, receiving everywhere the recognition due to an artist, not to a prodigy. That German public, so devoted to music in its highest forms, led by masters of such varied genius, took the child to its heart. Nobles and princes paid her compliments and bestowed beautiful presents upon her. A countess, who took the most affectionate interest in her, insisted on giving her an ornament she had worn at her own confirmation,--a large cross of pearls attached to a long chai
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 22
Camilla accompanied Madame Sontag to New Orleans, where they gave eighteen concerts, followed by six weeks of opera, in which Madame Sontag was the star. The two artists created a genuine furore, exciting their Southern audiences to the highest pitch of enthusiasm. Bouquets came in showers, and the applause was incessant. One night Madame Sontag carried eighty-six bouquets from the stage, and the fairy violinist often received fifteen or twenty. From New Orleans Madame Sontag went to Mexico, and Camilla never saw her again. They parted in March, 1854, and Signor Urso took his daughter to Savannah, and subsequently gave concerts in different cities of Georgia and some other Southern States. They then returned to New York, where, in May, they heard of the sudden death of Madame Sontag by cholera. The news of this loss prostrated the sensitive child with grief. She refused to appear at concerts, and seemed to lose all animation and vivacity. A change of scene was at last im
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
f the great masters. In her childlike devotion to the genius of Beethoven, Chopin, and Mendelssohn, she reminds one of Hilda, the girl-artist of Hawthorne's Marble Faun, whose life was spent in study of Raphael and Michael Angelo. It is better, thinks this earnest woman, to render vocal the great conceptions of the past, than to win a cheap reputation by fleeting musical mediocrities. Her remarkable memory retains all the music she plays, the orchestral parts as well as her own. Madame Urso's stay in this country is now uncertain. Her latest performances have been in the New England cities, and in New York. She has accepted an engagement in California, and will probably leave for San Francisco in July. Her ardent desire is to return to Paris, and make that city her home. If she leaves us, it will be with the possibility of coming again to America, at some time in the distant future. She will take with her a thousand good wishes, and leave behind her memories of delight.
Palermo (Italy) (search for this): chapter 22
estra, as their penetrating and aerial tones completed for us the harmonic pictures or the wordless songs! And in the hands of a genius whose thoughtful brain and ardent heart have comprehended and mastered its powers, what a magical shell is this crooked, stringed, sonorous thing of wood! The brain and heart of a true violinist came into the world one summer-day in the city of Nantes, France. This beautiful old Huguenot city was then the residence of Salvator Urso, a musician from Palermo, Sicily, and his Portuguese wife, whose maiden name was Emilie Girouard. Signor Urso was an organist and flutist of rare merit, educated thoroughly in all the principles of his art by his father, who had dane hearty service to music in younger days. On the 13th of June, 1842, Camilla Urso was born,--the first child of a happy union. Though four brothers followed her, the little daughter was most passionately beloved by her father, who gloried in her inheritance of that gift which had been h
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