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urning to Madame Urso, you see how these people treat their pianos.--They bang them, they beat them, they kick them, they smash them to pieces; but our fiddles I how we love them I Oh, yes, indeed, was Camilla's earnest answer, with a flash of her most expressive eyes. Her fiddles are three, her favorite one being a Guiseppe Guamarius, made in 1737. For this she has a standing offer of $2000 in gold. An Amati is also in her little collection, and the prize violin of the Exposition of 1867, made by C. A. Miremont, which was sent her at the close of the Exposition. Her bow was made in 1812. The grave, and frequently sad expression of Madam, Urso's face, during her performances, has given rise to man) anecdotes of her life which are absurdly untrue. All who love the charming artist will be glad to know that family sufferings do not add to the pathos of her Elegies, and that beatings are not reserved for the patient mistress of the bow. Those who have the pleasure of her
December, 1853 AD (search for this): chapter 22
ll, New York. In 1852 Madame Henriette Sontag, Countess Rossi, came to this country to make a trial of the public which had received Jenny Lind with such enthusiasm and generosity. She won honors everywhere by her dramatic talent and marvellous voice. Hearing of Camilla Urso's success, she proposed to add her to her own concert-troupe. At the conclusion of his daughter's engagement with Alboni, Signor Urso accepted the overtures of Sontag, and Camilla joined her at Cincinnati, in December, 1853. Brief as was their connection, the most tender relations were established between them. Nothing could be more beautiful than the sight of this magnificent woman, who was then the imperial mistress of song, surrounding with truly maternal kindness the lonely little novice whom chance had brought to her arms. The generous affection of Madame Sontag was never forgotten by the child, and the now famous violinist speaks of her benefactress with a devotion which years cannot diminish.
of enthusiasm. Bouquets came in showers, and the applause was incessant. One night Madame Sontag carried eighty-six bouquets from the stage, and the fairy violinist often received fifteen or twenty. From New Orleans Madame Sontag went to Mexico, and Camilla never saw her again. They parted in March, 1854, and Signor Urso took his daughter to Savannah, and subsequently gave concerts in different cities of Georgia and some other Southern States. They then returned to New York, where, in May, they heard of the sudden death of Madame Sontag by cholera. The news of this loss prostrated the sensitive child with grief. She refused to appear at concerts, and seemed to lose all animation and vivacity. A change of scene was at last imperatively necessary, and she went with her father to Canada in 1856. This trip was very successful, though not entirely professional. She travelled through the country, giving some concerts, and winning admiration from crowded houses. One incid
nal character except for charitable purposes. But the cherished violin did not lose its power in these years of quiet. She learned more of life, and through varied experience her genius grew. When she returned to the concert hall, on the 16th of March, 1863, at a Philharmonic concert in New York, she won instantly her old place, and rained influence upon us with those calm wavings of her enchanted bow. She was soon engaged to play at the Philharmonic concerts in Boston. In the autumn of 1863 she received a beautiful gift from some of the modern Athenians in the form of a watch and chain, --the watch decorated with green enamel, and a diamond of great value. On one side of the watch was engraved,-- Camilla Urso. From her Boston friends. Nov. 8th, 1863. The gift was enclosed in a velvet box, bearing upon the cover her initials in gold within a laurel wreath. Engagements now crowded upon her, and she visited in succession most of the cities that had known her as a child,
August 12th, 1852 AD (search for this): chapter 22
to come to America. He offered her a salary of twenty thousand dollars a year; and, as the family was in need of the assistance the child's violin could give, the offer was gladly accepted. Preparations were made for an extensive tour, and a concert-troupe of eight was engaged. Auber, hearing of her intended departure, presented her with the following testimonial, which she justly regards as one of her dearest treasures-- National Conservatory of music and of declamation. Paris, August 12, 1852. Mademoiselle Camilla Urso is a young pupil of the National Conservatory of Music. Although still at a very tender age, she has obtained brilliant success in several concerts in Paris, and above all at the Conservatory, where the jury have decreed to her by election the first prize at the competition for the prizes of the year. Learning that she is soon to depart for the United States, I am delighted to state the happy qualities which ought to ensure her a noble artistic career.
ians in the form of a watch and chain, --the watch decorated with green enamel, and a diamond of great value. On one side of the watch was engraved,-- Camilla Urso. From her Boston friends. Nov. 8th, 1863. The gift was enclosed in a velvet box, bearing upon the cover her initials in gold within a laurel wreath. Engagements now crowded upon her, and she visited in succession most of the cities that had known her as a child, spending much time in Boston, New York, and Chicago. In 1864 she went to Europe, sailing in the China, on the 26th of August. Reaching Liverpool she prepared at once to go to Paris,--her home for some years, and the scene of some of her earliest triumphs. She was wonderfully successful in this centre of art, and became the lioness of the saloons. Pasdeloup's monster orchestra was then performing in the Cirque Napoleon. Paris, with all its superb theatres has no large music hall. Camilla Urso was invited to play with this orchestra, and played,
February 22nd, 1859 AD (search for this): chapter 22
he gallant marines showed her a hundred graceful attentions, presented her with bouquets, and she, in return, bewitched them with the music of her violin. While in Canada she met with a serious loss. Her collection of presents, containing a magnificent bracelet presented by the Germania Society; her cross of pearls with its chain of coral, and other ornaments of great value, prized as the souvenirs of her childhood's triumphs, and her European residence, were in New York. On the 22d of February, 1859, when the people of the house where she had left her property had gone to see the annual parade in honor of Washington's birthday, some one entered and possessed himself of her jewels. Search was unavailing, nothing was ever again heard of them. On her return from Canada her mother met her in New York. The joy of mother and daughter, reunited after so long a separation, may easily be imagined. They spent some time together, and then professional duties called the child away. Sh
August 26th (search for this): chapter 22
d with green enamel, and a diamond of great value. On one side of the watch was engraved,-- Camilla Urso. From her Boston friends. Nov. 8th, 1863. The gift was enclosed in a velvet box, bearing upon the cover her initials in gold within a laurel wreath. Engagements now crowded upon her, and she visited in succession most of the cities that had known her as a child, spending much time in Boston, New York, and Chicago. In 1864 she went to Europe, sailing in the China, on the 26th of August. Reaching Liverpool she prepared at once to go to Paris,--her home for some years, and the scene of some of her earliest triumphs. She was wonderfully successful in this centre of art, and became the lioness of the saloons. Pasdeloup's monster orchestra was then performing in the Cirque Napoleon. Paris, with all its superb theatres has no large music hall. Camilla Urso was invited to play with this orchestra, and played, at one of their concerts, Mendelssohn's great concerto.
March, 1854 AD (search for this): chapter 22
ey gave eighteen concerts, followed by six weeks of opera, in which Madame Sontag was the star. The two artists created a genuine furore, exciting their Southern audiences to the highest pitch of enthusiasm. Bouquets came in showers, and the applause was incessant. One night Madame Sontag carried eighty-six bouquets from the stage, and the fairy violinist often received fifteen or twenty. From New Orleans Madame Sontag went to Mexico, and Camilla never saw her again. They parted in March, 1854, and Signor Urso took his daughter to Savannah, and subsequently gave concerts in different cities of Georgia and some other Southern States. They then returned to New York, where, in May, they heard of the sudden death of Madame Sontag by cholera. The news of this loss prostrated the sensitive child with grief. She refused to appear at concerts, and seemed to lose all animation and vivacity. A change of scene was at last imperatively necessary, and she went with her father to Canad
J. Fries, B. J. Lang, Ernst Perabo, etc. The outside world of mere lovers of music sometimes give their opinions of Camilla's playing in remarks equally earnest, though hardly scientific. One auditor, after listening to her in wide-mouthed amazement, declared with a most emphatic gesture, that she was woman enough to vote. At a concert in Chicago, an admirer, who was asked whether there had been any flowers on the stage that night, answered, None but Camelia Urso. In the spring of 1865, soon after her return from Europe, Madame Urso played at a concert in New Haven. The hall was crowded with a noisy audience, composed mainly of students, irrepressible and critical, and young ladies who were deeply occupied with them and their criticisms. The unhappy pianist of the occasion met with hearty contempt. The talking went on as gayly as ever. But when the violinist entered, with her simple, natural manner, and stood quietly a moment waiting, the house was hushed. First she pl
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