hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Petrarch 42 0 Browse Search
Cleopatra 10 0 Browse Search
Dame Craigie 8 0 Browse Search
Roger Harlakenden 8 0 Browse Search
Samuel Longfellow 6 0 Browse Search
Aphrodite 6 0 Browse Search
Sappho 6 0 Browse Search
Block Island (Missouri, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Barrett Browning 4 0 Browse Search
Shakespeare 4 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations. Search the whole document.

Found 6 total hits in 3 results.

Dame Craigie. [Lines read at the Longfellow Memorial Reading, Cambridge, Feb. 27, 1888.] in childish Cambridge days, now long ago, When pacing schoolward in the morning hours, I passed the stately homes of Tory Row And paused to see Dame Craigie tend her flowers. Framed in the elm-tree boughs before her door The old escutcheon of our town was seen,-- Canker-worms pendent, yellowing leaves in or, School-boys regardant, on a field grass-green. Dame Craigie, with Spinoza in her hand, Was once heard murmuring to the insect crew, “I will not harm you, little restless band! For what are mortal men but worms, like you?” The trees are gone; Dame Craigie too is gone, Her tongue long silent, and her turban furled; Yet 'neath her roof thought's silk-worms still spun on, Whose sumptuous fabric clothed a barren worl
Dame Craigie (search for this): chapter 25
Dame Craigie. [Lines read at the Longfellow Memorial Reading, Cambridge, Feb. 27, 1888.] in childish Cambridge days, now long ago, When pacing schoolward in the morning hours, I passed the stately homes of Tory Row And paused to see Dame CraigiDame Craigie tend her flowers. Framed in the elm-tree boughs before her door The old escutcheon of our town was seen,-- Canker-worms pendent, yellowing leaves in or, School-boys regardant, on a field grass-green. Dame Craigie, with Spinoza in her hand, Was onDame Craigie, with Spinoza in her hand, Was once heard murmuring to the insect crew, “I will not harm you, little restless band! For what are mortal men but worms, like you?” The trees are gone; Dame Craigie too is gone, Her tongue long silent, and her turban furled; Yet 'neath her roof thoughband! For what are mortal men but worms, like you?” The trees are gone; Dame Craigie too is gone, Her tongue long silent, and her turban furled; Yet 'neath her roof thought's silk-worms still spun on, Whose sumptuous fabric clothed a barren wo
February 27th, 1888 AD (search for this): chapter 25
Dame Craigie. [Lines read at the Longfellow Memorial Reading, Cambridge, Feb. 27, 1888.] in childish Cambridge days, now long ago, When pacing schoolward in the morning hours, I passed the stately homes of Tory Row And paused to see Dame Craigie tend her flowers. Framed in the elm-tree boughs before her door The old escutcheon of our town was seen,-- Canker-worms pendent, yellowing leaves in or, School-boys regardant, on a field grass-green. Dame Craigie, with Spinoza in her hand, Was once heard murmuring to the insect crew, “I will not harm you, little restless band! For what are mortal men but worms, like you?” The trees are gone; Dame Craigie too is gone, Her tongue long silent, and her turban furled; Yet 'neath her roof thought's silk-worms still spun on, Whose sumptuous fabric clothed a barren worl