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Syracuse (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
resistance, endurance, and flight. Those who in later years read the fine dramatic delineations in the poem Barclay of Ury do not quite appreciate the school in which Whittier learned what life meant to Barclay. The first time that actual violence came near Whittier, in his own town of Haverhill, though it missed him, was after there had been established (on April 3, 1834) an antislavery society of which he was secretary. A year or so later, in August, 1835, the Rev. Samuel J. May of Syracuse, N. Y., preached in the Unitarian pulpit at Haverhill and announced that he should give an antislavery address in the evening. The result is thus described by the historian of Haverhill:-- The evening meeting was entirely broken up by a mob outside, who threw sand and gravel and small stones against the windows, breaking the glass, and by their hootings frightened the female portion of the audience, and led to the fear on the part of all, that more serious assaults would follow if the me
Haverhill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
time that actual violence came near Whittier, in his own town of Haverhill, though it missed him, was after there had been established (on Ael J. May of Syracuse, N. Y., preached in the Unitarian pulpit at Haverhill and announced that he should give an antislavery address in the evening. The result is thus described by the historian of Haverhill:-- The evening meeting was entirely broken up by a mob outside, who mults of that otherwise quiet Sabbath evening. Chase's History of Haverhill, p. 505. The preacher thus mobbed was, by universal admission the other avenues being guarded, and hurried in the direction of Haverhill. In the morning they stopped to refresh themselves and their tirhe landlord told them that there had been an abolition meeting at Haverhill the night before, and that George Thompson, the Englishman, and aand mouth with wonder as they drove away. When they arrived at Haverhill they learned of the doings of the mob there, and the fortunate es
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ere is my country (Ubi libertas, ibi patria) replied that this was a coward's phrase, since the brave man's watchword would be, Where liberty is not, there is my country. Thompson was of course received with peculiar hostility as a foreigner, a feeling not yet extinct, for it is not many years since I saw him disdainfully classed as a foreign carpet-bagger, and that by one of the most eminent of Boston philanthropists. He had been mobbed, accordingly, in one place after another, including Salem, whence he had escaped with difficulty and had been afterward secreted by Whittier for two weeks in East Haverhill. He and Whittier had personally undertaken a few antislavery meetings, and had set out for that purpose. I take what followed from the excellent description of their friend, Mrs. Cartland:-- ... Thinking themselves secure because personally unknown, the two friends drove to Plymouth, N. H., to visit Nathaniel P. Rogers, a prominent abolitionist. On their way they stopped
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
mischief enveloped in flames. The devouring element seemed to wear, combined with its terrible majesty, beauty and delight. To witness those beautiful spires of flame gave undoubted assurance to the heart of the Southron that in his brethren of the North he has friends. Linton's Whittier, pp. 74-76. This shows what the mob discipline was. It did not drive Whittier from his non-resistant principles, as was the case with most of the men of that stamp who went nearly thirty years later to Kansas; it only made him more absolutely sure and resolute in proclaiming the antislavery gospel. Nor was this the whole story. The next day a Shelter for coloured Orphans was burned, and a church of the coloured people attacked and damaged. The day before the first attack the Pennsylvania Antislavery Society had announced a meeting at the hall for the election of officers, and at the appointed hour it met by the smoking ruins and went through its business amid the howling of the mob. The tum
Plymouth, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
hilanthropists. He had been mobbed, accordingly, in one place after another, including Salem, whence he had escaped with difficulty and had been afterward secreted by Whittier for two weeks in East Haverhill. He and Whittier had personally undertaken a few antislavery meetings, and had set out for that purpose. I take what followed from the excellent description of their friend, Mrs. Cartland:-- ... Thinking themselves secure because personally unknown, the two friends drove to Plymouth, N. H., to visit Nathaniel P. Rogers, a prominent abolitionist. On their way they stopped for the night in Concord at the house of George Kent, who was a brother-in-law of Rogers. After they had gone on their way, Kent attempted to make preparations for an antislavery meeting to be held when they should return. There was furious excitement, and neither church, chapel, nor hall could be hired for the purpose. On their arrival Whittier walked out with a friend in the twilight, leaving Thomps
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
as the ordeal by which Whittier's Quaker training was tested, but it rang true. He would not arm himself, but he did not flinch where others were arming. His courage was to be once more tested, however, in Philadelphia, while he edited the Pennsylvania Freeman. A hall had been erected by the antislavery people and other reformers, and was first opened on May 15, 1838. There was an address by the eminent lawyer, David Paul Brown, and a poem of a hundred and fifty lines by Whittier, whose pubns and went through its business amid the howling of the mob. The tumults lasted a week, and at the end of this time the mayor offered a reward for the arrest of the rioters, from which nothing followed. The summary of the whole affair in the Pennsylvania Freeman was written by Whittier and Charles Burleigh. It was practically the record of the poet's baptism into the second degree of reform — the period of mob violence. Years after, Whittier had a curious memorial of this period-- Onc
Whittier (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he peaceful early stage of the antislavery moment; the mob period was approaching. It was a time peculiarly trying to those who had been bred in the non-resistance theory, and had to choose for themselves among the three alternatives, resistance, endurance, and flight. Those who in later years read the fine dramatic delineations in the poem Barclay of Ury do not quite appreciate the school in which Whittier learned what life meant to Barclay. The first time that actual violence came near Whittier, in his own town of Haverhill, though it missed him, was after there had been established (on April 3, 1834) an antislavery society of which he was secretary. A year or so later, in August, 1835, the Rev. Samuel J. May of Syracuse, N. Y., preached in the Unitarian pulpit at Haverhill and announced that he should give an antislavery address in the evening. The result is thus described by the historian of Haverhill:-- The evening meeting was entirely broken up by a mob outside, who thr
Portland (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the howling of the mob. The tumults lasted a week, and at the end of this time the mayor offered a reward for the arrest of the rioters, from which nothing followed. The summary of the whole affair in the Pennsylvania Freeman was written by Whittier and Charles Burleigh. It was practically the record of the poet's baptism into the second degree of reform — the period of mob violence. Years after, Whittier had a curious memorial of this period-- Once when he was passing through Portland, Me., a man, seeing him go by, stepped out of his shop and asked if his name were Whittier, and if he were not the man who was stoned, years ago, by a mob at Concord. The answer being in the affirmative, he said he believed a devil possessed him that night; for he had no reason to wish evil either to Whittier or Thompson, yet he was filled with a desire to kill them, and he thought he should have done so if they had not escaped. He added that the mob was like a crowd of demons, and he knew
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
to Plymouth, N. H., to visit Nathaniel P. Rogers, a prominent abolitionist. On their way they stopped for the night in Concord at the house of George Kent, who was a brother-in-law of Rogers. After they had gone on their way, Kent attempted to mawrote of the Concord mob to his brother-in-law, Sept. 12, 1835, Our brother Thompson had a narrow escape from the mob at Concord, and Whittier was pelted with mud and stones, but he escaped bodily damage. Thompson wrote to Garrison, Sept. 15:-- You would have been delighted to have shared our adventures in Concord (?) on the memorable night of the 4th inst. The mirthful and the melancholy were so strangely and equally blended throughout, that I scarcely know which had the advantage, and d out of his shop and asked if his name were Whittier, and if he were not the man who was stoned, years ago, by a mob at Concord. The answer being in the affirmative, he said he believed a devil possessed him that night; for he had no reason to wis
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ont House, was present, with a large number of his slaveholding guests, who had come to Boston to make their annual purchases of the merchants. Their presence seemed to inspire Mr. Thompson. Never, even from his eloquent lips, did I hear such scathing denunciations of slavery. The exasperated Southerners could not contain their wrath. Their lips were tightly compressed, their hands clinched; and now and then a muttered curse was audible. Finally, one of them shouted, If we had you down South, we'd cut off your ears. Mr. Thompson folded his arms in his characteristic manner, looked calmly at the speaker, and replied, Well, sir, if you did cut off my ears, I should still cry aloud, He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. Meanwhile my heart was thumping like a sledge-hammer; for, before the speaking began, Samuel J. May had come to me, and said in a very low tone: Do you see how the walls are lined by stout truckmen, brandishing their whips? They are part of a large mob aro
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