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Huguenot (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
al Society his intention to prepare a full and exhaustive history of the relation of Puritan and Quaker in the seventeenth century, but there seems no evidence that he followed up this project. There was undoubtedly in Whittier, amid all his quietness of life, that impulsiveness which revealed itself in his brilliant eye and subdued decision of manner. A good deal has been said, as Mr. Robert S. Rantoul has admirably pointed out, about Mr. Whittier's fighting blood; whether it came from Huguenot or Norman veins, or from his Indian-fighting ancestors who deserted the meeting trail and camp. He had a good deal of the natural man left under his brown homespun, waistcoat, and straight collar. He had the reticence and presence of an Arab chief, with the eye of an eagle. Among all Howells's characters in fiction, the one who most caught Whittier's fancy was that indomitable old German, Linden, in the Hazard of New Fortunes, whom he characterised, in writing to Mrs. Fields, as that sai
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
slide. One of his points of prominence was naturally his position as a member of the Society of Friends. On the publication of the extended Memorial history of Boston, in four large volumes, in 1880, edited by the unquestioned chief among Massachusetts historians, Justin Winsor, Whittier furnished by request a poem bearing on early local history, The King's Missive. The first verse of the poem, now well known, was as follows:--Under the great hill sloping bare To cove and meadow and Commondition to which her friends had been subjected, as a sign and warning to the persecutors. Whatever of indecency there was in these cases was directly chargeable upon the atrocious persecution. At the door of the magistrates and ministers of Massachusetts must be laid the insanity of the conduct of these unfortunate women. But Boston, at least, had no voluntary Godivas. The only disrobed women in its streets were made so by Puritan sheriffs and constables, who dragged them amidst jeering c
Amesbury (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
n I have ever aspired to. Truly your friend, John G. Whittier. Amesbury, 9th, 3d mo., 1867. It is known that in the same conscientious living in the next town, to an agitation for the Ten Hour Bill at Amesbury, and there are various references to it in his brief letters to mritten in 1848, but imperfectly dated, as his letters often were: Amesbury, 13th, 7th mo. My dear Higginson: Thy letter was clearly to theeigners, which entirely changed the character of the operatives in Amesbury. Ms. Letter, Aug. 26, 1902. So in regard to spiritual libertyeditors to take up this theme. A year later Whittier writes from Amesbury, whither he had removed: I have one item of good news from HaverhiAug. 25, 1869, he replied thus explicitly and also wisely:-- Amesbury, Mass., 12th, 8th Month, 1869. I have received thy letter invitingaded and able woman, Miss Alice Freeman, now Mrs. G. H. Palmer:-- Amesbury, 7th mo., 1881. Miss Freeman's speech was eloquent and wise —
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
, had no voluntary Godivas. The only disrobed women in its streets were made so by Puritan sheriffs and constables, who dragged them amidst jeering crowds at the cart-tail, stripped for the lash, which in one instance laid open with a ghastly gash the bosom of a young mother! Kennedy's Whittier, 275-79. It has been stated that Mr. Whittier at one time expressed to a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society his intention to prepare a full and exhaustive history of the relation of Puritan and Quaker in the seventeenth century, but there seems no evidence that he followed up this project. There was undoubtedly in Whittier, amid all his quietness of life, that impulsiveness which revealed itself in his brilliant eye and subdued decision of manner. A good deal has been said, as Mr. Robert S. Rantoul has admirably pointed out, about Mr. Whittier's fighting blood; whether it came from Huguenot or Norman veins, or from his Indian-fighting ancestors who deserted the meeting tra
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
a member to appear before it to answer to the charge of non-attendance. She obeyed the call by appearing in the unclothed condition of the sufferers whom she had seen under the constable's whip. For this she was taken to Ipswich and stripped to the waist, tied to a rough post, which tore her bosom as she writhed under the lash, and severely scourged to the satisfaction of a crowd of lookers — on at the tavern. One, and only one, other instance is adduced in the person of Deborah Wilson of Salem. She had seen her friends and neighbours scourged naked through the street, among them her brother, who was banished on pain of death. She, like all Puritans, had been educated in the belief of the plenary inspiration of Scripture, and had brooded over the strange signs and testimonies of the Hebrew prophets. It seemed to her that the time had arrived for some similar demonstration, and that it was her duty to walk abroad in the disrobed condition to which her friends had been subjected,
Ipswich, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
is not strange that these atrocious proceedings, in two or three instances, unsettled the minds of the victims. Lydia Wardwell of Hampton, who, with her husband, had been reduced to almost total destitution by persecution, was summoned by the church of which she had been a member to appear before it to answer to the charge of non-attendance. She obeyed the call by appearing in the unclothed condition of the sufferers whom she had seen under the constable's whip. For this she was taken to Ipswich and stripped to the waist, tied to a rough post, which tore her bosom as she writhed under the lash, and severely scourged to the satisfaction of a crowd of lookers — on at the tavern. One, and only one, other instance is adduced in the person of Deborah Wilson of Salem. She had seen her friends and neighbours scourged naked through the street, among them her brother, who was banished on pain of death. She, like all Puritans, had been educated in the belief of the plenary inspiration of
Georgetown, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
p of authors. The attitude of Whittier toward reform agitations in general was never better shown than in his prompt response to the announcement of certain limitations placed by George Peabody on the church built largely by his money in Georgetown, Mass. The facts were first brought to light by the New York Independent on Jan. 16, 1868, by the following statement:-- A Marred Memorial. Mr. George Peabody, the banker, gave money for the erection of the Memorial Church in Georgetown, MasGeorgetown, Mass., the town of his birth. The church was dedicated on the 8th of January, with interesting exercises, one of the striking features of which was the singing of the following hymn, written for the occasion by John G. Whittier. . . . We venture to say that if the poet had known the conditions which the banker saw fit to impose on the Memorial Church, the poem would never have been written, and its author's name would never have been lent to the occasion. A correspondent of the Independent write
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
letter, probably written in 1848, but imperfectly dated, as his letters often were: Amesbury, 13th, 7th mo. My dear Higginson: Thy letter was clearly to the purpose and was read at the Levee, and will be published this week in the Villager: -Thou will see by the Villager of last week what we are doing about the Ten Hour Law. That must be a point in our elections this fall — I think we can carry it through the next legislature. I hope thou will be able to go to the Dist. Convention at Lowell tomorrow. Our del. is instructed to go for thee as one of the delegates to Pittsburg. Don't refuse. We shall be glad to see thee at any time. Ever thine, J. G. W. On application to the Hon. George W. Cate, he has refreshed my memory in regard to the details of the strike which led to this ten-hour agitation, and they are as follows:-- Your memory of Mr. Whittier's position in regard to strikes is correct. At the time of the Derby turnout, or strike, at Amesbary, which was man
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Amesbury, 13th, 7th mo. My dear Higginson: Thy letter was clearly to the purpose and was read at the Levee, and will be published this week in the Villager: -Thou will see by the Villager of last week what we are doing about the Ten Hour Law. That must be a point in our elections this fall — I think we can carry it through the next legislature. I hope thou will be able to go to the Dist. Convention at Lowell tomorrow. Our del. is instructed to go for thee as one of the delegates to Pittsburg. Don't refuse. We shall be glad to see thee at any time. Ever thine, J. G. W. On application to the Hon. George W. Cate, he has refreshed my memory in regard to the details of the strike which led to this ten-hour agitation, and they are as follows:-- Your memory of Mr. Whittier's position in regard to strikes is correct. At the time of the Derby turnout, or strike, at Amesbary, which was many years ago, in 1852 I think, Mr. Whittier was in full sympathy with the strikers.
Barbados (Barbados) (search for this): chapter 8
, their books taken from them and burned by the constable, and they themselves brought before Deputy Governor Bellingham, in the absence of Endicott. This astute magistrate ordered them to be stripped naked and their bodies to be carefully examined, to see if there was not the Devil's mark on them as witches. They were then sent to jail, their cell window was boarded up, and they were left without food or light, until the master of the vessel that brought them was ordered to take them to Barbadoes. When Endicott returned he thought they had been treated too leniently, and declared that he would have had them whipped. After this, almost every town in the province was favoured with the spectacle of aged and young women stripped to the middle, tied to a cart-tail, and dragged through the streets and scourged without mercy by the constable's whip. It is not strange that these atrocious proceedings, in two or three instances, unsettled the minds of the victims. Lydia Wardwell of Ha
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