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nies of the Hebrew prophets. It seemed to her that the time had arrived for some similar demonstration, and that it was her duty to walk abroad in the disrobed condition to which her friends had been subjected, as a sign and warning to the persecutors. Whatever of indecency there was in these cases was directly chargeable upon the atrocious persecution. At the door of the magistrates and ministers of Massachusetts must be laid the insanity of the conduct of these unfortunate women. But Boston, at least, had no voluntary Godivas. The only disrobed women in its streets were made so by Puritan sheriffs and constables, who dragged them amidst jeering crowds at the cart-tail, stripped for the lash, which in one instance laid open with a ghastly gash the bosom of a young mother! Kennedy's Whittier, 275-79. It has been stated that Mr. Whittier at one time expressed to a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society his intention to prepare a full and exhaustive history of the rel
Alice Freeman (search for this): chapter 8
f life and duty, it is not likely to prove a blessing in her hands any more than in man's. With great respect and hearty sympathy, I am very truly thy friend. Again he wrote, of a speech by that eminently clearheaded and able woman, Miss Alice Freeman, now Mrs. G. H. Palmer:-- Amesbury, 7th mo., 1881. Miss Freeman's speech was eloquent and wise — the best thing in the Institute. Perhaps even Francis Parkman might think she could be safely trusted to vote. These opinions, it wiln her hands any more than in man's. With great respect and hearty sympathy, I am very truly thy friend. Again he wrote, of a speech by that eminently clearheaded and able woman, Miss Alice Freeman, now Mrs. G. H. Palmer:-- Amesbury, 7th mo., 1881. Miss Freeman's speech was eloquent and wise — the best thing in the Institute. Perhaps even Francis Parkman might think she could be safely trusted to vote. These opinions, it will be seen, cover an interval of nearly half a centu
, as men of letters, deservedly occupy a higher place in the popular estimation than I have ever aspired to. Truly your friend, John G. Whittier. Amesbury, 9th, 3d mo., 1867. It is known that in the same conscientious spirit he was unwilling to insert in his Songs of three centuries Mrs. Howe's Battle hymn of the republic, but as he wrote to his assistant editor, I got over my Quaker scruples, or rather stifled them, and put in the Battle hymn. He adds that he cannot do justice to Campbell's works in this series, but we can't print his war pieces, and so we will let him slide. One of his points of prominence was naturally his position as a member of the Society of Friends. On the publication of the extended Memorial history of Boston, in four large volumes, in 1880, edited by the unquestioned chief among Massachusetts historians, Justin Winsor, Whittier furnished by request a poem bearing on early local history, The King's Missive. The first verse of the poem, now well k
George W. Cate (search for this): chapter 8
published this week in the Villager: -Thou will see by the Villager of last week what we are doing about the Ten Hour Law. That must be a point in our elections this fall — I think we can carry it through the next legislature. I hope thou will be able to go to the Dist. Convention at Lowell tomorrow. Our del. is instructed to go for thee as one of the delegates to Pittsburg. Don't refuse. We shall be glad to see thee at any time. Ever thine, J. G. W. On application to the Hon. George W. Cate, he has refreshed my memory in regard to the details of the strike which led to this ten-hour agitation, and they are as follows:-- Your memory of Mr. Whittier's position in regard to strikes is correct. At the time of the Derby turnout, or strike, at Amesbary, which was many years ago, in 1852 I think, Mr. Whittier was in full sympathy with the strikers. I think the particulars of the turnout were given quite fully by C. D. Wright. At that time, all the people who were empl
Abby Folsom (search for this): chapter 8
Half of the forenoon of the first day was spent in debating whether the convention should be organised by the choice of president and secretary, or whether these old-fashioned restraints should be set aside as unworthy of advocates of the largest liberty, leaving each member to do and say what seemed right in his own eyes! It was finally decided to have a president. Then came on a discussion about the Sabbath, in which Garrison and two transcendental Unitarians, and a woman by the name of Folsom, argued that every day should be held sacred; that it was not a rest from labour but from sin that was wanted; that keeping First day as holy was not required, etc. On the other hand, Amos A. Phelps, Dr. Osgood, and some others contended for the Calvinistic and generally received views of the subject. Dr. Channing, John Pierpont, and many other distinguished men were present, but took no part in the discussions. No Friends were members of the convention, although there were several lookers
March 9th, 1867 AD (search for this): chapter 8
al, something apart from the real object and aim of my life; and whatever of favour they have found with the public has come to me as a grateful surprise, rather than as an expected reward. As I have never staked all on the chances of authorship, I have been spared the pain of disappointment and the temptation to envy those, who, as men of letters, deservedly occupy a higher place in the popular estimation than I have ever aspired to. Truly your friend, John G. Whittier. Amesbury, 9th, 3d mo., 1867. It is known that in the same conscientious spirit he was unwilling to insert in his Songs of three centuries Mrs. Howe's Battle hymn of the republic, but as he wrote to his assistant editor, I got over my Quaker scruples, or rather stifled them, and put in the Battle hymn. He adds that he cannot do justice to Campbell's works in this series, but we can't print his war pieces, and so we will let him slide. One of his points of prominence was naturally his position as a member
ur assumed superiority to imitate the horror and wide-orbed consternation of Mr. Bumble and his parochial associates, on a similar occasion. Later, when the movement had got farther on, and he was invited to a convention on the subject, held at Newport, R. I., on Aug. 25, 1869, he replied thus explicitly and also wisely:-- Amesbury, Mass., 12th, 8th Month, 1869. I have received thy letter inviting me to attend the Convention in behalf of Woman's Suffrage, at Newport, R. I., on the 25th inst. I do not see how it is possible for me to accept the invitation; and, were I to do so, the state of my health would prevent me from taking such a part in the meeting as would relieve me from the responsibility of seeming to sanction anything in its action which might conflict with my own views of duty or policy. Yet I should do myself great injustice if I did not embrace this occasion to express my general sympathy with the movement. I have seen no good reason why mothers, wives, and dau
July 13th (search for this): chapter 8
ch tended to the elevation of the labouring class. This I know well, for I lent a hand, when living in the next town, to an agitation for the Ten Hour Bill at Amesbury, and there are various references to it in his brief letters to me. A natural politician of the higher sort, he rejoiced in an effort to bring such a bill Vefore the state legislature, where it finally triumphed. Thus I find a letter, probably written in 1848, but imperfectly dated, as his letters often were: Amesbury, 13th, 7th mo. My dear Higginson: Thy letter was clearly to the purpose and was read at the Levee, and will be published this week in the Villager: -Thou will see by the Villager of last week what we are doing about the Ten Hour Law. That must be a point in our elections this fall — I think we can carry it through the next legislature. I hope thou will be able to go to the Dist. Convention at Lowell tomorrow. Our del. is instructed to go for thee as one of the delegates to Pittsburg. Don't ref
ries Mrs. Howe's Battle hymn of the republic, but as he wrote to his assistant editor, I got over my Quaker scruples, or rather stifled them, and put in the Battle hymn. He adds that he cannot do justice to Campbell's works in this series, but we can't print his war pieces, and so we will let him slide. One of his points of prominence was naturally his position as a member of the Society of Friends. On the publication of the extended Memorial history of Boston, in four large volumes, in 1880, edited by the unquestioned chief among Massachusetts historians, Justin Winsor, Whittier furnished by request a poem bearing on early local history, The King's Missive. The first verse of the poem, now well known, was as follows:--Under the great hill sloping bare To cove and meadow and Common lot, In his council chamber and oaken chair, Sat the worshipful Governor Endicott. A grave, strong man who knew no peer In the pilgrim land, where he ruled in fear Of God, not man, and for good or ill
July, 1881 AD (search for this): chapter 8
ss manly or woman less womanly when they meet on terms of equality before the law. On the other hand, I do not see that the exercise of the ballot by woman will prove a remedy for all the evils of which she justly complains. It is her right as truly as mine, and when she asks for it, it is something less than manhood to withhold it. But, unsupported by a more practical education, higher aims, and a deeper sense of the responsibilities of life and duty, it is not likely to prove a blessing in her hands any more than in man's. With great respect and hearty sympathy, I am very truly thy friend. Again he wrote, of a speech by that eminently clearheaded and able woman, Miss Alice Freeman, now Mrs. G. H. Palmer:-- Amesbury, 7th mo., 1881. Miss Freeman's speech was eloquent and wise — the best thing in the Institute. Perhaps even Francis Parkman might think she could be safely trusted to vote. These opinions, it will be seen, cover an interval of nearly half a century
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