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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1.

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. Martha Hersey, a sister of Mrs. Relief Sumner's mother, married Elisha Simmons, of Hanover, who died, in 1825, at the age of eighty. The site of his residence is near that of Perez Simmons, but on the opposite side of the way. One of his sons was William Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1804, a judge of the police court of Boston, and the father of William H. Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1831, and of Rev. George F. Simmons, of the class of 1832. Judge Simmons and Charles Pinckney Sumner were faithful friends, and their families maintained an intimacy. Joshua Hersey, a brother of Mrs. Relief Sumner's mother, lived on Prospect Street in South Hingham, under Prospect Hill, a well-known landmark. Upon this estate now live his children. of Hingham, and died in 1799, at the age of thirty-six. His home was but a short distance from his father's, and its site is now occupied by the residence of Perez Simmons. The first child of David, J
osh, who was the son of Sir James, the English publicist and historian; and another married Henry W. Longfellow, the poet. he had Job, his ninth child, who was the father of Charles Pinckney Sumner, and the grandfather of Charles Sumner. The following are reliable authorities concerning the genealogy of the Sumner Family: Memoir of Increase Sumner, Governor of Massachusetts, by his son, William H. Sumner: together with a genealogy of the Sumner Family, prepared by William B. Trask; Boston, 1854. New England Historical and Genealogical Register, April, 1854, and October, 1855. History of East Boston, by William H. Sumner; Boston, 1858; pp. 278-307 (with a drawing of the St. Edburg Church). History of Dorchester; Boston, 1859. The Sumners who remained in Dorchester and Milton during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were generally farmers, owning considerable estates in fee-simple, and blessed beyond the usual measure with large families of children. The Jacob or Jacobs
ith his class in the catalogues of the alumni. He served as lieutenant in Moses Draper's company of Thomas Gardner's Massachusetts regiment at Bunker Hill, Memorials of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati, by Francis S. Drake. and in Bond's (25th) regiment at the siege of Boston and the invasion of Canada; was commissioned captain in the Second Massachusetts regiment, April 7, 1779, to date from July 1, 1776 (commission signed by John Jay, President of Congress); captain in the Thi 1782. His several commissions are preserved. The following sketch of Major Sumner is combined from two manuscript sketches left by his son, with some abridgment:— On the 21st of April, 1776, the regiments under Colonels Greaton, Patterson, Bond, and Poor were sent, after the evacuation of Boston by the British, to succor the remnants of Montgomery's army, then hard pressed and on their retreat from Canada. In one of these regiments Sumner was a lieutenant,— healthful, active, and intell
Lancaster (search for this): chapter 1
he was appointed one of a committee for building a new meeting-house, and in 1663 was chosen clerk of ye training band. Roger, the second son From his third son, George, who lived on Brush Hill, Milton, descended, in the fifth generation, Increase Sumner; an associate justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, 1782-97, and the successor of Samuel Adams, in 1797, as governor of the Commonwealth. of the emigrant ancestor, was baptized at Bicester, Aug. 8, 1632. Marrying Mary Josselyn, of Lancaster, he had seven children. In 1660, he removed from Dorchester to Lancaster, that he might, with other Christians at Lancaster, join together for the gathering of a church; but, after the destruction of that town by the Indians, he removed to Milton (set off from Dorchester and incorporated in 1662), where he became the deacon of the first church, and died in 1698. His fourth son, William, who was born about 1673, had, for his seventh child, Seth, who was born in 1710, and became, by two ma
John Marshall (search for this): chapter 1
cuation of Boston by the British, to succor the remnants of Montgomery's army, then hard pressed and on their retreat from Canada. In one of these regiments Sumner was a lieutenant,— healthful, active, and intelligent. By the invitation of his general officers, Schuyler and Arnold, he was induced to quit for a while his station in the line and enter the flotilla of gunboats, which those generals found it necessary to equip on Lake Champlain. An account of this flotilla may be found in Marshall's Life of Washington, Vol. III. pp. 4-10; Irving's Life of Washington, Vol. II. p. 384, ch. XXXIX. In this service, in which he was appointed captain, July 1, 1776, by General Arnold, he distinguished himself as commander of one of the armed vessels. On this account, by recommendation of the Board of War, which reported that in this service he had, in several actions, behaved with great spirit and good conduct, Congress voted, April 7, 1779, that he have a commission as captain in the ar
d at its hardships. He had an ear and voice for music, and delighted in hunting-songs and marches rather than in psalmody. He enjoyed books, we are told, such as military dictionaries, State constitutions, Shakspeare, Don Quixote, and Smith's Wealth of Nations. One or more of these were the companions of his travels, and all of them he owned. Two relics of his handwriting remain,— copies of lines of poetry, one from Home's Douglass, and the other, Othello's apology. In the autumn of 1785, he was appointed by Congress a commissioner for settling the accounts between the Confederation and the State of Georgia. He remained in that State until his death, with occasional visits to his friends in New York and Boston, and his relatives in Milton. When in Massachusetts, he was usually the guest of Daniel Vose, at whose house in Milton he had lived before he entered college. In 1787, Governor John Hancock appointed him a justice of the peace,—a distinction then less common than
had been for ever laid aside, was kindly remembered by his college. On June 13, 1777, it was voted that all the charges in Sumner's quarterly bills, since the end of the first quarter in the year 1775, be abated, as he has been engaged in the army ever since the commencement of the war, though he never appeared to give up his relation to the college. Again, July 7, 1785, two years after Independence was acknowledged, it was voted by the President and Fellows (present the President, Governor Bowdoin, Mr. Lowell, Dr. Harvard, Dr. Lathrop, and the Treasurer), that Major Job Sumner, who was admitted into the University A. D. 1774, and who entered the service of his country in the army, by leave from the late President, early in the contest between Great Britain and the United States of America, and who, during the war, behaved with reputation as a man and as an officer, be admitted to the degree of Master of Arts at the next commencement, and have his name inserted in the class to whi
, for weeks and months together, some miles in advance of the division, either up or down the North River, in some exposed position, at Verplanck's Point, Fishkill, or Peekskill. His command involved constant activity. While serving under General Heath, he was impressed with the characteristic difference between that officer and General Arnold, under whom he had served on the northern frontier in 1776. He said to General Heath, one day, that he hoped at some time to see more of the hazardsGeneral Heath, one day, that he hoped at some time to see more of the hazards of war, and to meet them on a larger theatre. The general, who was a prudent rather than an adventurous officer, replied: I am placed here to retain the fortress of West Point, and not to seek battles. You have as exposed a duty as can be assigned to you,—the separate command of a company at an advanced post. If the officers of such posts are known to relax in their vigilance, we may expect a general battle very soon; which I hope you will have no share in bringing on. If my division enjoys
Shakspeare (search for this): chapter 1
tent on some errand. He was quick in observation, frank in his intercourse with men, and liable to be deceived. He adapted himself readily to society of various kinds, and was widely acquainted with persons of every grade in the army. He was fond of a soldier's life, and never repined at its hardships. He had an ear and voice for music, and delighted in hunting-songs and marches rather than in psalmody. He enjoyed books, we are told, such as military dictionaries, State constitutions, Shakspeare, Don Quixote, and Smith's Wealth of Nations. One or more of these were the companions of his travels, and all of them he owned. Two relics of his handwriting remain,— copies of lines of poetry, one from Home's Douglass, and the other, Othello's apology. In the autumn of 1785, he was appointed by Congress a commissioner for settling the accounts between the Confederation and the State of Georgia. He remained in that State until his death, with occasional visits to his friends in N
Don Quixote (search for this): chapter 1
life, and never repined at its hardships. He had an ear and voice for music, and delighted in hunting-songs and marches rather than in psalmody. He enjoyed books, we are told, such as military dictionaries, State constitutions, Shakspeare, Don Quixote, and Smith's Wealth of Nations. One or more of these were the companions of his travels, and all of them he owned. Two relics of his handwriting remain,— copies of lines of poetry, one from Home's Douglass, and the other, Othello's apologyf securities of the United States and of the State of Georgia, which had risen in value with the adoption of the National Constitution. The most interesting items of the inventory were a Shakspeare in eight volumes, Smith's Wealth of Nations, Don Quixote, Junius, Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom, Boswell's Tour, Anecdotes of Dr. Johnson, and a History of England. Among other books left by him was Lord Chesterfield's Letters to his Son. His traits of character appear quite clearly in h
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