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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1.

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offices of his friend, Colonel Josiah H. Vose. Major Sumner's estate was valued at about $12,000. It consisted chiefly of land-warrants, one of which was for forty-six hundred acres, and of securities of the United States and of the State of Georgia, which had risen in value with the adoption of the National Constitution. The most interesting items of the inventory were a Shakspeare in eight volumes, Smith's Wealth of Nations, Don Quixote, Junius, Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom, Boswell's Tour, Anecdotes of Dr. Johnson, and a History of England. Among other books left by him was Lord Chesterfield's Letters to his Son. His traits of character appear quite clearly in his son's manuscript records and the traditions of his birthplace. He was a man of genuine courage, adventurous spirit, and capacity for affairs; generous with his money, and faithful in all trusts. He took life merrily, and rejected the severity of the Puritan standards. His love of knowledge was atteste
of the college laws, he be admitted into the present Freshman Class. His most distinguished classmate was Nathan Dane, who reported in Congress the ordinance of 1787 for the government of the North-west Territory, by which a vast domain was saved to freedom. Rev. Samuel Langdon had become president of the college, July 18, 177h the rank of an ensign. He had already acquired some knowledge of the drill in a college company, called the Marti-Mercurian Band, which existed in the years 1770-87, Reminiscences of the Old College Company, or Marti-Mercurian Band, in Columbian Centinel, Boston, April 2, 1828, by Charles Pinckney Sumner. References to this cnd his relatives in Milton. When in Massachusetts, he was usually the guest of Daniel Vose, at whose house in Milton he had lived before he entered college. In 1787, Governor John Hancock appointed him a justice of the peace,—a distinction then less common than now. Before Major Sumner entered upon his duties as commissione
Henry Jackson (search for this): chapter 1
mand of the detachment, during the evacuation and for some time afterwards, devolved largely upon Major Sumner. General Washington, Dec. 4, 1783, immediately after taking leave of his officers at Fraunces' Tavern, passed through this battalion of light infantry, and received from it the last military salute of the Revolutionary army. One regiment, formed from the disbanded army, was continued in service at West Point a few months after the discharge of the rest. In this regiment, Colonel Henry Jackson was first in rank, Lieutenant-Colonel William Hull the second, Major Caleb Gibbs the third, and Major Sumner the fourth. On July 1, 1784, his military career finally closed. Major Sumner was about five feet and ten inches in height, rather stout in person, and walked rapidly, bending forward and seemingly intent on some errand. He was quick in observation, frank in his intercourse with men, and liable to be deceived. He adapted himself readily to society of various kinds, and w
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 1
. 4, 1608. William, his only son and heir, from whom descended Charles Sumner, in the seventh generation, was baptized in St. Edburg, Jan. 27s the father of Charles Pinckney Sumner, and the grandfather of Charles Sumner. The following are reliable authorities concerning the genealogy of the Sumner Family: Memoir of Increase Sumner, Governor of Massachusetts, by his son, William H. Sumner: together with a genealogy of tldren. The Jacob or Jacobs family,—the maternal ancestors of Charles Sumner,—begins with Nicholas Jacob, who came to this country from Hinga, married a descendant of Governor William Bradford, from whom Charles Sumner is thus descended. Martha Hersey, a sister of Mrs. Relief Sumns Relief, who was born, Feb. 29, 1785, and became the mother of Charles Sumner. The Jacob family were generally farmers, residing in Hingham,f them discharged important civic trusts. The grandfather of Charles Sumner. Job Sumner was born in Milton, April 23, 1754. The house o
Sydney Smith (search for this): chapter 1
unting-songs and marches rather than in psalmody. He enjoyed books, we are told, such as military dictionaries, State constitutions, Shakspeare, Don Quixote, and Smith's Wealth of Nations. One or more of these were the companions of his travels, and all of them he owned. Two relics of his handwriting remain,— copies of lines tution was then in session in New York. His pall was upheld by eight officers of the late army: General Webb, and Colonels Bauman, Walker, Hamilton, Willet, Platt, Smith, and White. The hearse was preceded by a regiment of artillery and the Society of the Cincinnati. New York Journal and Weekly Register, Sept. 16, 1789: Gazette Georgia, which had risen in value with the adoption of the National Constitution. The most interesting items of the inventory were a Shakspeare in eight volumes, Smith's Wealth of Nations, Don Quixote, Junius, Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom, Boswell's Tour, Anecdotes of Dr. Johnson, and a History of England. Among other b
for building a new meeting-house, and in 1663 was chosen clerk of ye training band. Roger, the second son From his third son, George, who lived on Brush Hill, Milton, descended, in the fifth generation, Increase Sumner; an associate justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, 1782-97, and the successor of Samuel Adams, in 1797, as governor of the Commonwealth. of the emigrant ancestor, was baptized at Bicester, Aug. 8, 1632. Marrying Mary Josselyn, of Lancaster, he had seven children. In 1660, he removed from Dorchester to Lancaster, that he might, with other Christians at Lancaster, join together for the gathering of a church; but, after the destruction of that town by the Indians, he removed to Milton (set off from Dorchester and incorporated in 1662), where he became the deacon of the first church, and died in 1698. His fourth son, William, who was born about 1673, had, for his seventh child, Seth, who was born in 1710, and became, by two marriages, the father of thirteen chil
d became the mother of Charles Sumner. The Jacob family were generally farmers, residing in Hingham, Scituate, South Scituate, and Hanover. They were marked by good sense and steady habits, and some of them discharged important civic trusts. The grandfather of Charles Sumner. Job Sumner was born in Milton, April 23, 1754. The house on Brush Hill, Milton, in which he was born is the home of one of his nephews, being near the residence of the Hon. James M. Robbins. His father died in 1771, leaving a widow and twelve children; and, two years later, Thomas Vose was appointed his guardian. Job was employed, after his father's death, upon the farm of Daniel Vose At Mr. Vose's house, still standing at the Lower Mills Village in Milton, adjacent to the railway station, were passed, in September, 1774, the Suffolk Resolves, which have been regarded as the earliest organized demonstration for Independence in the American colonies. The centenary of this event was commemorated in t
ng Mary Josselyn, of Lancaster, he had seven children. In 1660, he removed from Dorchester to Lancaster, that he might, with other Christians at Lancaster, join together for the gathering of a church; but, after the destruction of that town by the Indians, he removed to Milton (set off from Dorchester and incorporated in 1662), where he became the deacon of the first church, and died in 1698. His fourth son, William, who was born about 1673, had, for his seventh child, Seth, who was born in 1710, and became, by two marriages, the father of thirteen children. By the first marriage he had Seth, the grandfather of Major-General Edwin V. Sumner, who was an officer of the regular army, served in the Mexican War, commanded in Kansas during a part of the controversy between the free-state and the pro-slavery men, and bore a distinguished part in the war of the Rebellion. By the second marriage By the same marriage he had, as his thirteenth and last child, Jesse, who was the father of H
ee years, nearly half the time, from 1637 to 1688; was a rater for five years, and a commissioner to try and issue small causes for nine years, from 1663 to 1671 inclusive. In 1645, he was appointed one of a committee for building a new meeting-house, and in 1663 was chosen clerk of ye training band. Roger, the second son From his third son, George, who lived on Brush Hill, Milton, descended, in the fifth generation, Increase Sumner; an associate justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, 1782-97, and the successor of Samuel Adams, in 1797, as governor of the Commonwealth. of the emigrant ancestor, was baptized at Bicester, Aug. 8, 1632. Marrying Mary Josselyn, of Lancaster, he had seven children. In 1660, he removed from Dorchester to Lancaster, that he might, with other Christians at Lancaster, join together for the gathering of a church; but, after the destruction of that town by the Indians, he removed to Milton (set off from Dorchester and incorporated in 1662), where he bec
pon his duties as commissioner, he was publicly presented by the Governor of Georgia to the General Assembly. Shortly before his death, he is said to have been voted for as Governor of that State in the General Assembly, and to have failed of success by only a few votes. He maintained there an expensive style of living, keeping his horse and servant, and enjoying the best and most fashionable company. He became embarrassed by improvident loans to his friends at home and in the South. From 1784 to 1789, poverty and debt prevailed. In a letter from Savannah, of July 16, 1788, he says: There never was a man, under such fair prospects as I had three years ago, so dreadfully cut up. I have been robbed by almost every man I have put any confidence in. They have taken all. His last visit to Boston was in the summer of 1788. It was then observed that his health had been impaired by his southern residence. Early in September, 1789, having lately experienced a severe attack of a fever, f
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