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th child, who was the father of Charles Pinckney Sumner, and the grandfather of Charles Sumner. The following are reliable authorities concerning the genealogy of the Sumner Family: Memoir of Increase Sumner, Governor of Massachusetts, by his son, William H. Sumner: together with a genealogy of the Sumner Family, prepared by William B. Trask; Boston, 1854. New England Historical and Genealogical Register, April, 1854, and October, 1855. History of East Boston, by William H. Sumner; Boston, 1858; pp. 278-307 (with a drawing of the St. Edburg Church). History of Dorchester; Boston, 1859. The Sumners who remained in Dorchester and Milton during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were generally farmers, owning considerable estates in fee-simple, and blessed beyond the usual measure with large families of children. The Jacob or Jacobs family,—the maternal ancestors of Charles Sumner,—begins with Nicholas Jacob, who came to this country from Hingham, England, in 1633, settle
y, largely still resident in that town, trace their lineage. His great-grandson, Joshua, married a descendant of Governor William Bradford, from whom Charles Sumner is thus descended. Martha Hersey, a sister of Mrs. Relief Sumner's mother, married Elisha Simmons, of Hanover, who died, in 1825, at the age of eighty. The site of his residence is near that of Perez Simmons, but on the opposite side of the way. One of his sons was William Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1804, a judge of the police court of Boston, and the father of William H. Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1831, and of Rev. George F. Simmons, of the class of 1832. Judge Simmons and Charles Pinckney Sumner were faithful friends, and their families maintained an intimacy. Joshua Hersey, a brother of Mrs. Relief Sumner's mother, lived on Prospect Street in South Hingham, under Prospect Hill, a well-known landmark. Upon this estate now live his children. of Hingham, and die
e the buildings, which were turned into barracks. The institution was temporarily removed to Concord. Washington arrived, July 2; and on the next day took command of the patriot army under the ancient elm which still attracts many a pilgrim. Sumner did not follow his teachers to Concord, but, in May, joined the army at Cambridge, with the rank of an ensign. He had already acquired some knowledge of the drill in a college company, called the Marti-Mercurian Band, which existed in the years 1770-87, Reminiscences of the Old College Company, or Marti-Mercurian Band, in Columbian Centinel, Boston, April 2, 1828, by Charles Pinckney Sumner. References to this company and its uniform may be found in The Harvard Book. Vol. I pp. 42, 67. and was afterwards revived as the Harvard Washington Corps. The good soldier, though his text-books had been for ever laid aside, was kindly remembered by his college. On June 13, 1777, it was voted that all the charges in Sumner's quarterly bills,
The Jacob or Jacobs family,—the maternal ancestors of Charles Sumner,—begins with Nicholas Jacob, who came to this country from Hingham, England, in 1633, settled in Watertown, and removed two years later to Hingham. For the genealogy of the Jacob family, see History of Hanover, by J. S. Barry, pp. 319-335; and for that of the Simmons family, pp. 371-374. His son John was the father of David, the grandfather of Joshua, and the great-grandfather of David, Sr., who was born in Scituate in 1729, and died in 1808. David Jacob, Sr., the grandfather of Relief Jacob, who became the wife of Charles Pinckney Sumner, owned ample estates, held public offices, and served on the Committee of Public Safety in the Revolution. The house, which he built and used for an inn, is now the residence of Rev. Robert L. Killam. It is situated in the part of Hanover known as Assinippi. His son David, Jr., who was born in Hanover in 1763, married Hannah Hersey, She was a descendant of William Hersey
the river. At first, the organization of the settlement was imperfect. In 1633, a local government was organized; and the next year the town sent delegates to the first general court or legislature. The community was still in its infancy, when William Sumner joined it. Two children were born to him after his arrival. The early records show that he entered actively on his duties as a citizen. He became at once a grantee of land. He was made a freeman in 1637; admitted to the church in 1652; was for twelve years a deputy to the general court; a selectman twenty-three years, nearly half the time, from 1637 to 1688; was a rater for five years, and a commissioner to try and issue small causes for nine years, from 1663 to 1671 inclusive. In 1645, he was appointed one of a committee for building a new meeting-house, and in 1663 was chosen clerk of ye training band. Roger, the second son From his third son, George, who lived on Brush Hill, Milton, descended, in the fifth gener
next year the town sent delegates to the first general court or legislature. The community was still in its infancy, when William Sumner joined it. Two children were born to him after his arrival. The early records show that he entered actively on his duties as a citizen. He became at once a grantee of land. He was made a freeman in 1637; admitted to the church in 1652; was for twelve years a deputy to the general court; a selectman twenty-three years, nearly half the time, from 1637 to 1688; was a rater for five years, and a commissioner to try and issue small causes for nine years, from 1663 to 1671 inclusive. In 1645, he was appointed one of a committee for building a new meeting-house, and in 1663 was chosen clerk of ye training band. Roger, the second son From his third son, George, who lived on Brush Hill, Milton, descended, in the fifth generation, Increase Sumner; an associate justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, 1782-97, and the successor of Samuel Adams, in 17
d to the church in 1652; was for twelve years a deputy to the general court; a selectman twenty-three years, nearly half the time, from 1637 to 1688; was a rater for five years, and a commissioner to try and issue small causes for nine years, from 1663 to 1671 inclusive. In 1645, he was appointed one of a committee for building a new meeting-house, and in 1663 was chosen clerk of ye training band. Roger, the second son From his third son, George, who lived on Brush Hill, Milton, descende1663 was chosen clerk of ye training band. Roger, the second son From his third son, George, who lived on Brush Hill, Milton, descended, in the fifth generation, Increase Sumner; an associate justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, 1782-97, and the successor of Samuel Adams, in 1797, as governor of the Commonwealth. of the emigrant ancestor, was baptized at Bicester, Aug. 8, 1632. Marrying Mary Josselyn, of Lancaster, he had seven children. In 1660, he removed from Dorchester to Lancaster, that he might, with other Christians at Lancaster, join together for the gathering of a church; but, after the destruction of that town by
his horse and servant, and enjoying the best and most fashionable company. He became embarrassed by improvident loans to his friends at home and in the South. From 1784 to 1789, poverty and debt prevailed. In a letter from Savannah, of July 16, 1788, he says: There never was a man, under such fair prospects as I had three years ago, so dreadfully cut up. I have been robbed by almost every man I have put any confidence in. They have taken all. His last visit to Boston was in the summer of 1788. It was then observed that his health had been impaired by his southern residence. Early in September, 1789, having lately experienced a severe attack of a fever, from the effects of which he had but imperfectly recovered, he embarked on board a vessel bound from Savannah to New York. While at sea, he was poisoned, we are told, by eating of a dolphin, caught off the copper banks of Cape Hatteras. The vessel made a rapid passage to New York, reaching there on the 14th, and he was taken on
n to Death and this tomb contains the remains of Major Job Sumner, of the Massachusetts line of the same army, who, having supported an Unblemished character through life as the soldier, citizen, and friend, died in this city, after A short illness, Universally regretted by his acquaintances, on the 16TH day of Sept., 1789, aged 33 years. the Glorious Field, the victors yeild. In 1799, Charles Pinckney Sumner sought information as to the tomb from a correspondent in New York. In 1829, at his request, his son Charles visited the yard and wrote, with a rough sketch, an account of its site, condition, and surroundings. The father caused it, soon after, to be repaired, through the good offices of his friend, Colonel Josiah H. Vose. Major Sumner's estate was valued at about $12,000. It consisted chiefly of land-warrants, one of which was for forty-six hundred acres, and of securities of the United States and of the State of Georgia, which had risen in value with the adopti
riage he had Seth, the grandfather of Major-General Edwin V. Sumner, who was an officer of the regular army, served in the Mexican War, commanded in Kansas during a part of the controversy between the free-state and the pro-slavery men, and bore a distinguished part in the war of the Rebellion. By the second marriage By the same marriage he had, as his thirteenth and last child, Jesse, who was the father of Harriot, the second wife of Nathan Appleton of Boston, a member of Congress in 1831-33, and again in 1842. It may be noted, that one of Mr. Appleton's daughters, by his first marriage, married Robert J. Mackintosh, who was the son of Sir James, the English publicist and historian; and another married Henry W. Longfellow, the poet. he had Job, his ninth child, who was the father of Charles Pinckney Sumner, and the grandfather of Charles Sumner. The following are reliable authorities concerning the genealogy of the Sumner Family: Memoir of Increase Sumner, Governor of Massachu
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