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M. Vasseur (search for this): chapter 10
the weakness rather than the nausea of sea-sickness, with his appetite returning upon him like a Bay of Fundy tide, to lie in his berth and hear the clatter of plates and the merry voices of his fellow-passengers, as they attacked a turkey or a duck, and as another cork briskly left the bottle. Our dinners I found quite pleasant. Our company was small,— Mr. John Munroe, a young merchant going to establish himself in Paris; Mr. Darlington, a midshipman on leave of absence for his health; M. Vasseur, a young Frenchman returning home after upwards of a year's absence; and a young man, a brother of the captain. And though with none of these did I have any particular sympathy,–any thing, indeed, which under other circumstances would have led to more than a passing acquaintance,—yet I found them uniformly pleasant; and our dinners, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, formed the reunions of the day. Several times after dinner I revived my old and forgotten knowledge, first gai<
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
counted their beads, and, bending to the ground in the attitude of devotion, looked absorbed in prayer. There is something tangible and palpable in the Catholic faith which the common mind readily takes hold of, as a handle. I have never seen people in the United States of this grade, except at a Methodist meeting, so absorbed in devotion. Ascending the hill at Havre, which I did in company with Mr. Emerson, Ralph Emerson, an American merchant, then resident in Havre, now living in San Francisco. I had a beautiful prospect over the city beneath, and passed in view of many of the country houses of gentlemen belonging to the city. I could distinctly observe the wall and moat which surrounded the city; though the city has now actually outgrown the military strait-jacket by which it was invested. Some of the best portions are without the walls. After a considerable walk took breakfast, say at twelve o'clock,—a late one, even for France; and it was a delicious meal, with light w
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
is my first experience of the rich memories of European history. On my left now are the chalky cliffs of England,—Plymouth, from which the Pilgrim ancestors of New England last started to come to our bleak places; also the Isle of Wight, consecrated by the imprisonment of the royal Charles; and the harbor of Portsmouth, big with t; but nearly all the lands are without any kind of fence. This gives the country a very open appearance to one accustomed to the stone walls and rail fences of New England. By the wayside I constantly saw cottages and barns covered with thatch, which was generally overgrown with moss. The thatch appears to be straw matted on theg out some of the principal chateaux. It was Sunday; and yet, as we drove through the different towns, we could observe none of the signs which mark this day in New England. Here Sunday shines no Sabbath day; all things proceed as on week days. The roads were thronged with market women, with their heavy burdens; the markets, thro
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rs. Ledyard's, Mrs. Susan Ledyard, 53 Crosby Street; a friend of Judge Story, and the daughter of Brockholst Livingston, a judge of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1806-23. She died March 7, 1864; surviving her husband, Benjamin Ledyard, more than half a century.— the last dinner of my native land. Left early, called on were regarded; where changes, and of course improvements, were slow to be introduced, from the impression that what was established was for the best. In the United States the extreme opposite of this character prevails. Nothing is beyond the reach of change and experiment. There is none of the prestige of age about any thing, yer. There is something tangible and palpable in the Catholic faith which the common mind readily takes hold of, as a handle. I have never seen people in the United States of this grade, except at a Methodist meeting, so absorbed in devotion. Ascending the hill at Havre, which I did in company with Mr. Emerson, Ralph Emerson,
Devonshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 10
e just left the dinner-table, where I remembered all in a glass of Burgundy. In both letters, as in his journal, he dwelt upon the historic scenes which belong to the English Channel. While writing the letter to Judge Story, a French whaleman came in sight, the tricolor flapping in the wind, the first sail seen during the voyage,—a refreshing sight, but momentary, as both vessels were speeding in opposite directions. On the evening of the 25th, the captain descried dimly Start Point, in Devonshire; and the next morning Sumner saw Cape Barfleur, about fifteen miles to the right, –his first glimpse of Europe, and the first land he had seen since the afternoon of the eighth, when he went below while the headlands of New Jersey were indistinctly visible on the distant horizon. On account of unfavorable winds encountered in the Channel, the Albany did not come to anchor at the Havre docks till early on the morning of the 28th,—less than twenty days from the time of sailing. Journ<
Portsmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 10
without however being able to catch a sight of them, and are now midway between the coasts of England and France. My mind has felt a thrill under the associations of these waters; it is my first experience of the rich memories of European history. On my left now are the chalky cliffs of England,—Plymouth, from which the Pilgrim ancestors of New England last started to come to our bleak places; also the Isle of Wight, consecrated by the imprisonment of the royal Charles; and the harbor of Portsmouth, big with the navies of England. On my right is la belle France and the smiling province of Normandy; and the waters which now bear this American ship are the same over which Caesar with his frail boats, and afterwards William of Normandy, passed to the conquest of England. Their waves dash now with the same foamy crests as when these two conquerors timidly entrusted themselves to their bosom. Civilization, in the mean time, with its attendant servants—commerce, printing, and Christian
Rouen (France) (search for this): chapter 10
allow, and early in the morning I prepared for Rouen; breakfasted at nine o'clock, at the hotel whey I did not hesitate all the way from Havre to Rouen to interrogate le conducteur to the full extenme with great grace. The road from Havre to Rouen (the upper one) which I travelled was mostly tr descending a long and steep hill, we entered Rouen,—time-honored Rouen. If Havre appeared ancienRouen. If Havre appeared ancient, what shall I say of Rouen? I seemed among catacombs. Nothing but the living countenances and when, at dusk, we entered the ancient city of Rouen, it seemed as if all the dreams of my boyhood d. And again of his visit to the cathedral at Rouen: Need I tell you that my whole frame thrilled e and respect. Dec. 30 (Saturday). A day at Rouen, the ancient capital of Normandy; and my eyes rity. It seems that I could spend months in Rouen and still find interest. If I had time and foo understand it. We talked of the cathedral at Rouen; and I told her that our forests were our cath[4 more...]
Havre (France) (search for this): chapter 10
istmas. It is now seventeen days since I left New York for Havre in the ship Albany, Captain Johnston. Described in a letbrother, Chas. Journal. Dec. 28, 1837. At length in Havre, with antiquity staring at me from every side. At four o'ctly on the qui vive for improvements. The common people in Havre now clatter over the ground in the same shoes which their gst meeting, so absorbed in devotion. Ascending the hill at Havre, which I did in company with Mr. Emerson, Ralph Emerson, an American merchant, then resident in Havre, now living in San Francisco. I had a beautiful prospect over the city beneath,r phrases. Accordingly I did not hesitate all the way from Havre to Rouen to interrogate le conducteur to the full extent ofwas pleased to endure me with great grace. The road from Havre to Rouen (the upper one) which I travelled was mostly throualance the facilities of the road. Within a few miles from Havre we passed through Harfleur, the same, I suppose, which Harr
Orleans (France) (search for this): chapter 10
ntal effigy; of William of the Long Sword, his son; of Henry, the father of Coeur de Lion; and here the Lion-heart itself was deposited. At a later day, the remains of the Duke of Bedford—the English regent of France, discomfited by the Maid of Orleans—were deposited here; and an inscription behind the great altar marks the spot. Different parts, in the neighborhood of altars, are occupied by inscriptions and engraved effigies of bishops, archbishops, cardinals, and other eminent men, whose smy means of getting correct information were so small, and my time so limited, that I passed to other objects, which possessed an interest into which I could more readily enter. Particularly among these was the market-place in which the Maid of Orleans was burnt; Place de la Pucelle. and a building which the Duke of Bedford was said to have occupied, and which had a beautiful relievo on its wall of the meeting of Francis and Henry at the Field of the Cloth of Gold. Bridges, market-places,
Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 10
explain to me about them, and my knowledge of French was so imperfect that I could with difficulty ascertain even the general nature of the discussion which was proceeding. The judges appeared to be numerous; in one court, which seemed the highest,—perhaps La Cour Royale,—there were as many as half a dozen, all having a peculiar costume, consisting of a cap, bands round the neck, and gown. The lawyers wore gowns and caps, and the dresses appeared to be different in the different courts. In Paris I hope to make these matters more of a study; but at this time my means of getting correct information were so small, and my time so limited, that I passed to other objects, which possessed an interest into which I could more readily enter. Particularly among these was the market-place in which the Maid of Orleans was burnt; Place de la Pucelle. and a building which the Duke of Bedford was said to have occupied, and which had a beautiful relievo on its wall of the meeting of Francis and
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