hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 918 2 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 302 0 Browse Search
George S. Hillard 221 1 Browse Search
W. W. Story 176 0 Browse Search
William W. Story 154 0 Browse Search
France (France) 154 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 134 0 Browse Search
Simon Greenleaf 129 11 Browse Search
Francis Lieber 112 16 Browse Search
Jonathan French 98 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 305 total hits in 77 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8
f the waters and the land. Retiring then to his berth, he thought of friends, and all that he had left behind, with confidence in their continued regard. You cannot imagine, he wrote to Hillard, the intensity with which my mind, during these moments, reverted to the old scenes and faces with which it was familiar. The wind kept fair and strong, and the voyage, for one made in a sailing vessel and during the winter, was exceptionally rapid and agreeable. Journal Dec. 25. On the fourth day I was rejoiced to find myself able to read, though lying in my berth. Previously my time had passed without the relief which this at once afforded. Chancellor Kent had been kind enough to advise me to take a stock of pleasant books, and I had provided myself with some on the morning of sailing. I read the fourth and fifth parts of Lockhart's Life of Scott, James's novel of Attila, Cooper's England, and the Life of Burr, while stretched in my berth; and never were books a greater luxur
January 1st (search for this): chapter 10
re that exist in Europe are here to be seen, also. However, to-morrow night is the last on which the hells of Paris are to be open, they being abolished after that time by law; and I wish, if possible, to see them, besides being in Paris on New Year's Day. To-morrow, therefore, I shall start for Paris. Dec. 31, 1837. At a quarter before seven o'clock I found myself in the coupe;, with a fellow-passenger from America, and a French lady. The apartment was small, being just large enough forge and heavy as they were, on their backs to the Hotel Montmorency, Boulevard Montmartre No. 12. Dinner despatched, I went about ten o'clock to Frascati's,—the great hell of Paris. By law all public gaming-houses are forbidden after the first of January, which commences this midnight. Passing through an outside court, and then a short entry, we entered an antechamber, where there were a large number of servants in livery who received our hats and outside garments, no one being allowed to e
December 31st, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 10
andy. From Normandy sprang the long line of kings that has governed England; and here are the tombs of the founders of this dynasty. Two of the finest specimens of Gothic architecture that exist in Europe are here to be seen, also. However, to-morrow night is the last on which the hells of Paris are to be open, they being abolished after that time by law; and I wish, if possible, to see them, besides being in Paris on New Year's Day. To-morrow, therefore, I shall start for Paris. Dec. 31, 1837. At a quarter before seven o'clock I found myself in the coupe;, with a fellow-passenger from America, and a French lady. The apartment was small, being just large enough for three persons to sit snugly. The gray light of morning was beginning to prevail, and as we passed under the towers of the cathedral, it seemed to invest them with an additional air of antiquity. It was not the moonlight, which struck through the numerous trellises and interstices, but the dim light of morning, w
December 28th, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 10
id. Try to understand every thing as you proceed; and cultivate a love for every thing that is true, good, and pure. I need not exhort you to set a price upon every moment of time; your own convictions, I have no doubt, have taught you that minutes are like gold filings, too valuable to be slighted,— for a heap of these will make an ingot. Give my love to mother, and all the family. Tell George to write me a brisk, news-full letter. Your affectionate brother, Chas. Journal. Dec. 28, 1837. At length in Havre, with antiquity staring at me from every side. At four o'clock this morning weighed anchor, and drifted with the tide and a gentle wind to the docks; a noble work, contrived for the reception of vessels, and bearing the inscription of An IX. Bonaparte 1er Consul,—the labor of this great man meeting me on the very threshold of France. Dismissed from the custom house we went to the Hotel de New York, where a smiling French woman received us, and we were shown each o
December 29th, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 10
hief features which I am able to recognize as distinguishing Havre from an American city are (1), antiquity; (2), dress of women with caps and without bonnets in the street; (3), labor of women; (4), presence of the military and police, a soldier or policeman presenting himself at every tarn; (5), narrowness and dirt of the streets; (6), houses of stone, and narrow and chimney-like. Of course, these are merely the features which have met the eye during the observation of a few hours. Dec. 29, 1837. New scenes have been rising upon me with each moment; I find myself now with midnight at hand, and new objects were breaking upon me until I closed the door of my chamber. I can hardly believe in my personal identity. Such is the intensity of my present experience, that all I have undergone to reach here seems obliterated. I enjoyed my first sleep ashore last night, in sheets of linen and on a pillow of down, as much as my excited imagination would allow, and early in the morning
December 26th, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 10
next morning Sumner saw Cape Barfleur, about fifteen miles to the right, –his first glimpse of Europe, and the first land he had seen since the afternoon of the eighth, when he went below while the headlands of New Jersey were indistinctly visible on the distant horizon. On account of unfavorable winds encountered in the Channel, the Albany did not come to anchor at the Havre docks till early on the morning of the 28th,—less than twenty days from the time of sailing. Journal. Dec. 26, 1837. At half-past 2 o'clock this afternoon a pilot from Havre came aboard. We were still off Cape Barfleur, and, as he informed me, fifty-four miles from Havre. I inquired after news, and particularly from England; to which his reply was, tout est tranquille,—his idea of news seeming to resolve itself into the question of peace or war. Dec. 27. Still in Havre Roads, and anchored within three miles of the city. Adverse winds have disappointed our expectations, and doomed us to a long<
enteen days since I left New York for Havre in the ship Albany, Captain Johnston. Described in a letter of Sumner to Judge Story, Dec. 25, as a man of science and veracity. My passage had been taken, and my bill on the Rothschilds in Paris obtained, on the 7th December. On that day dined with a pleasant party at Mrs. Ledyard's, Mrs. Susan Ledyard, 53 Crosby Street; a friend of Judge Story, and the daughter of Brockholst Livingston, a judge of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1806-23. She died March 7, 1864; surviving her husband, Benjamin Ledyard, more than half a century.— the last dinner of my native land. Left early, called on one or two friends, and spent the residue of the hours before retiring—running far into the watches of the night—in writing letters; saying some parting words to the friends whom I value. And a sad time it was, full of anxious thoughts and doubts, with mingled gleams of glorious anticipations. I thought much of the position which I abandoned <
... 3 4 5 6 7 8