hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 918 2 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 302 0 Browse Search
George S. Hillard 221 1 Browse Search
W. W. Story 176 0 Browse Search
William W. Story 154 0 Browse Search
France (France) 154 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 134 0 Browse Search
Simon Greenleaf 129 11 Browse Search
Francis Lieber 112 16 Browse Search
Jonathan French 98 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 202 total hits in 111 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Middletown (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
institution, but I perceived it to be a hopeless undertaking to procure his admission. The thought of a military education was probably prompted by the circumstance that a relative, Edwin V. Sumner, and a friend of the family, Josiah H Vose, were of the regular army. The father began inquiries in relation to the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy, under the charge of Captain Alden Partridge, which was first established at Norwich, Vt., and had recently been removed to Middletown, Conn. The school was conducted on a military system, and enrolled cadets from nineteen States. In 1829 it was discontinued, and the present Wesleyan University was established on its site. The father's letter to Captain Partridge gives an interesting description of his son:— Boston, 15 August, 1825. Sir,—I have read the prospectus which you issued, in 1821, at Norwich, and I have recently read a notice, in the Palladium, that you wish to employ some lads in your institution at M
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
, there was the customary dinner at Faneuil Hall, attended by the mayor, Josiah Quincy, the distinguished guests, the school-committee, and other municipal officers. The scholars who had been on that day decorated with the medals also attended. President Adams, who had since his father's recent death abstained from participation in festivities, made the occasion an exception. He was present at the dinner, and spoke with his usual energy and aptness. After a tribute to the worthies of Massachusetts in other days, and a reference to the recent commemoration of the lives of Adams and Jefferson, he closed his inspiring speech with the sentiment, The blooming youth! May the maturity of the fruit equal the promise of the blossom! His wish was to be fulfilled in at least one of the scholars who heard him. On August 2, three weeks before these festivities, Daniel Webster delivered, at Faneuil Hall, his oration on Adams and Jefferson. Early in the morning of that day, the young men o
Chelsea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
uniformly called, without however intending or giving offence. One was applied to him, as expressive of his awkwardness. His growth was rapid, and his constitution rather delicate than robust; but his only illness in early life occurred when he was six years old. The fare of the family table was quite simple, but Charles was entirely content with it. Boston, which with its growth in space and numbers is now a city of nearly 350,000 inhabitants, The suburban cities of Cambridge and Chelsea together contain, in addition, nearly 70,000 inhabitants. contained in Sumner's early boyhood only about 40,000. It retained its town organization until 1822, its citizens electing selectmen and voting upon municipal affairs in Faneuil Hall. Within its limits, then quite narrow, were many open spaces, now covered by warehouses and dwellings. Ample gardens were spread out on streets since lined with blocks. Families most regarded for lineage and wealth lived near the Common and the State
Cumana (Sucre, Venezuela) (search for this): chapter 3
ute one day, in the middle of the class exercises, with an ill-natured teacher, who undertook to put him down for ignorance on some point of geography,—a branch not studied in the school, or made the subject of examination on admission. Sumner, then about eleven years of age, replied, with spirit, that he could answer any question which the teacher might put to him. The teacher bethought himself a moment, and, going to his table, and looking up what he esteemed a difficulty, asked him where Cumana was. The boy replied instantly, with a full and correct answer; and no further question was asked. Other pupils at the school do not recall any characteristics, as distinguishing him from his fellows. He was a thoughtful, studious youth, always fond of reading. His mother, in later life, often spoke of this trait of his boyhood. He enjoyed history most of all, reading it not in an easy, careless way, but with earnest attention, sitting on a low seat, and with maps spread out before
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
gave no promise of a remarkable career; and yet both teachers and pupils respected his qualities of mind and his disposition. The exhibition, or annual visitation, of the Latin and other schools at the close of the five-years' course, in 1826, took place Wednesday, Aug. 23. The occasion, at the Latin School, was graced by distinguished guests,—John Quincy Adams, then President of the United States, Nicholas Biddle, the President of the Bank of the United States, Leverett Saltonstall, of Salem, and Admiral Sir Isaac Coffin, a native of Boston and an officer in the British navy. The sixth part—not a prominent one— was A Discussion on the Comparative Merits of the Present Age and the Age of Chivalry.—C. Sumner and H. W. Sargent. Six scholars, of whom Charles was one, each received a Franklin medal. His is still preserved, with the same blue ribbon which was then attached to it. In the afternoon, there was the customary dinner at Faneuil Hall, attended by the mayor, Josiah Quin
Ovid (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
at the Latin School comprehended more than was then or is now required for admission to Harvard College. It included, in Latin, Adam's Latin Grammar, Liber Primus, Epitome Historiae Graecae (Siretz), Viri Romae, Phaedri Fabulae, Cornelius Nepos, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Sallust's Catiline and Jugurthine War, Caesar, Virgil, Cicero's Select Orations, the Agricola and Germania of Tacitus, and the Odes and Epodes of Horace. In Greek, it included Valpy's Greek Grammar, the Delectus Sententiarum Graes used; and in reading, Lindley Murray's English Reader. On the fly-leaf of many of his text-books which he used in the Latin School and in College he wrote the motto, Me jure tenet. In 1824, Charles won a third prize for a translation from Ovid, and a second prize for a translation from Sallust; and, in 1826, second prizes for a Latin hexameter poem and an English theme. He received, for the two prizes last named, an English edition of Gibbon's History in twelve volumes. A detur, award
Norwich (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e of Captain Alden Partridge, which was first established at Norwich, Vt., and had recently been removed to Middletown, Conn. The school was conducted on a military system, and enrolled cadets from nineteen States. In 1829 it was discontinued, and the present Wesleyan University was established on its site. The father's letter to Captain Partridge gives an interesting description of his son:— Boston, 15 August, 1825. Sir,—I have read the prospectus which you issued, in 1821, at Norwich, and I have recently read a notice, in the Palladium, that you wish to employ some lads in your institution at Middletown. I have a son, named Charles Sumner, in his fifteenth year, and large of his age, but not of so firm and solid a constitution as I should wish to have him. He has no immoral practices or propensities known to me; he has acquired a pretty good knowledge of Latin and Greek; understands the fundamental rules of arithmetic, and has a superficial knowledge of the whole.
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ose rather than rapid movement. One was humble, indeed, not to be personally known to most of his fellow-citizens. Harvard College diffused an atmosphere of culture among a people distinguished for a traditional love of learning. Charles's father, being a lawyer and liberally educated, ranked with the intelligent class, but he had not the fortune to place him in the more exclusive society. He had also separated himself from the political party which attracted the wealth and culture of New England. Among such a people, and with such surroundings, the boyhood of Charles Sumner was passed. The boy's life was not wholly within the city; he sometimes visited his maternal relatives at South Hingham, where, with others of the family, he was the guest of his mother's uncle. Here he could enjoy the view from Prospect Hill, near by. Once, he and his brother Albert took a long walk, from South Hingham to Nantasket Beach. He was fond of going with the cow-boy for the cattle, at evening
Norwich, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
was once my son's wish to become a member of your institution, but I perceived it to be a hopeless undertaking to procure his admission. The thought of a military education was probably prompted by the circumstance that a relative, Edwin V. Sumner, and a friend of the family, Josiah H Vose, were of the regular army. The father began inquiries in relation to the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy, under the charge of Captain Alden Partridge, which was first established at Norwich, Vt., and had recently been removed to Middletown, Conn. The school was conducted on a military system, and enrolled cadets from nineteen States. In 1829 it was discontinued, and the present Wesleyan University was established on its site. The father's letter to Captain Partridge gives an interesting description of his son:— Boston, 15 August, 1825. Sir,—I have read the prospectus which you issued, in 1821, at Norwich, and I have recently read a notice, in the Palladium, that you
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
annual visitation, of the Latin and other schools at the close of the five-years' course, in 1826, took place Wednesday, Aug. 23. The occasion, at the Latin School, was graced by distinguished guests,—John Quincy Adams, then President of the United States, Nicholas Biddle, the President of the Bank of the United States, Leverett Saltonstall, of Salem, and Admiral Sir Isaac Coffin, a native of Boston and an officer in the British navy. The sixth part—not a prominent one— was A Discussion on thUnited States, Leverett Saltonstall, of Salem, and Admiral Sir Isaac Coffin, a native of Boston and an officer in the British navy. The sixth part—not a prominent one— was A Discussion on the Comparative Merits of the Present Age and the Age of Chivalry.—C. Sumner and H. W. Sargent. Six scholars, of whom Charles was one, each received a Franklin medal. His is still preserved, with the same blue ribbon which was then attached to it. In the afternoon, there was the customary dinner at Faneuil Hall, attended by the mayor, Josiah Quincy, the distinguished guests, the school-committee, and other municipal officers. The scholars who had been on that day decorated with the meda
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...