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William Penn (search for this): chapter 5
composition, which in a painter we should call a free pencil. . . . I know you will wish you were here during this last week. The election for member of Congress has taken place, and, as it turned upon the tariff and anti-tariff, it produced a considerable excitement. Nathan Appleton, father of Appleton in the present Senior class, was the tariff candidate, and Henry Lee the anti-tariff one, both merchants. The Tariffites held one caucus just a fortnight ago, at which Evarts, author of William Penn, J. B. Davis, A. H. Everett, J. T. Austin, Ben. Gorham (present Representative), and William Sullivan spoke; and lastly the huge leviathan of New England, Webster himself. He spoke but a few minutes, simply expressing his wish to address his fellow-citizens at length on this subject; and, as it was then late, moving an adjournment to Saturday, Oct. 30. On Saturday evening, the hall [Faneuil] was crowded to excess an hour before the time (to which the meeting adjourned) had arrived. Ne
Archy Moore (search for this): chapter 5
acitus, Juvenal, Persius; in poetry and general literature, Shakspeare and Milton, Finished, Oct. 12. Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, The Correspondence of Gilbert Wakefield with Charles James Fox, Chiefly on Subjects of Classical Literature, Moore's Life of Byron, Butler's Reminiscences, Hume's Essays; and, in history, Hallam, Robertson, and Roscoe. He copied at great length into his commonplace-book—soon after laid aside—the narrations and reflections of these historians. He read both tof received opinions, but his radical notions were under the control of good sense. The two friends discussed political topics, like Masonry, and the public men of the day; literary themes, like the characters of Shakspeare, Milton's poetry, and Moore's Biography of Byron; Hallam's History of the Middle Ages, and the historical characters of Francis I. and Charles V. They criticised for mutual improvement each other's style of writing so plainly and unreservedly, that only their assured confi
Amasa Walker (search for this): chapter 5
hich you have subjected yourself. Such voluntary sacrifices in a man of your age and circumstances augur well of his coming years. Persevere! Browne wrote, Sept. 28, You have begun well. Quarter-past five in the morning is auspicious. Macte! Walker's geometry, with its points, lines, angles, &c., is a good employment for an adept in mathematics, like yourself. ... Read your course of history by all means. If you mean to grapple with the law, dissect the feudal system. Your reading is a fo brick as a specimen of a house he had for sale, acted about as wisely as the Faculty in this particular, thus forcing us to slice off a few bits and offer them as the successful Bowdoin dissertations. . . . Just a week ago yesterday, I commenced Walker's Geometry, and have now got nearly half through. All those problems, theorems, &c., which were such stumbling-blocks to my Freshman-year career, unfold themselves as easily as possible now. You would sooner have thought, I suppose, that fire an
Encyclopaedia Americana (search for this): chapter 5
of him, and other kindly words. Little thought the great orator that he was greeting one who was to succeed him in the Senate, with a longer term and, as time may show, a more enduring fame than his own. The prize was given in Lieber's Encyclopaedia Americana, valued at thirty dollars. The books were afterwards sent to Sumner, with a note signed by Mr. Webster, certifying that they were awarded as a premium for the essay. His classmates were greatly pleased with his success. Tower wrote, shed the evening lecture) by Mr. Webster himself, in presence of the society, and found to contain my name. I had to step out and receive some compliments from the godlike man, and the information that the society awarded to me Lieber's Encyclopaedia Americana, price thirty dollars. Surely the prize and praise were most easily gained. Mind you, I tell this with no vanity. It requires, though, the eye of a friend not to read in the foregoing lines a self-praising disposition. With you I trus
Middle Ages (search for this): chapter 5
ossible now. You would sooner have thought, I suppose, that fire and water would have embraced than mathematics and myself; but, strange to tell, we are close friends now. I really get geometry with some pleasure. I usually devote four hours in the forenoon to it. I have determined not to study any profession this year, and I have marked out to myself a course of study which will fully occupy my time,—namely, a course of mathematics, Juvenal, Tacitus, a course of modern history, Hallam's Middle Ages and Constitutional History, Roscoe's Leo and Lorenzo, and Robertson's Charles V.; with indefinite quantities of Shakspeare, Burton, British poets, &c., and writing an infinite number of long letters. I have doomed myself to hard labor, and I shall try to look upon labor as some great lawyer did, as pleasure,—Labor ipse voluptas. And the gratification from labor is, indeed, the surest and most steadfast pleasure. . . . President Quincy has been completely successful; has done himself, th
hn Pickering. The society gave public notice that, on April 1, the envelope corresponding to the manuscript which had been approved as the best would be opened at the Athenaeum Hall. On the evening appointed, at the close of a lecture by Chief-Justice Shaw, Mr. Webster opened the envelope in presence of the audience, and announced Charles Sumner as the name enclosed. He requested Sumner to come forward; and, taking him by the hand, called him his young friend, adding the remark that the publlike, anonymously. After several months, a committee of twelve unanimously awarded the premium to me, or rather to my signature,—my name not being known till the night the premium was presented; when the envelope inclosing it was opened (after Judge Shaw had finished the evening lecture) by Mr. Webster himself, in presence of the society, and found to contain my name. I had to step out and receive some compliments from the godlike man, and the information that the society awarded to me Lieber'
Dugald Stewart (search for this): chapter 5
e. . . . I intend to give myself to the law, so as to read satisfactorily the regular and parallel courses, to take hold of some of the classics,—Greek, if I can possibly gird up my mind to the work,—to pursue historical studies,—to read Say and Stewart; J. B. Say's Treatise on Political Economy, and Dugald Stewart's Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind. all mingled with those condiments to be found in Shakspeare and the British poets. All empty company and association I shall escheDugald Stewart's Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind. all mingled with those condiments to be found in Shakspeare and the British poets. All empty company and association I shall eschew, and seek in the solitariness of my own mind the best (because the least seducing from my studies) companion. Can I hold fast to these good determinations? I fear much the rebellious spirit of the mortal. However, I will try. I must endeavor to redress by future application my past remissness. The latter part of this year has been given up to unprofitableness. I have indeed studied, or passed my eyes over books; but much of my time, and almost my whole mind, have been usurped by newspaper<
undergo. Give me my first year and a half in the entirely theoretical studies of a law-school and my remainder in a thronged business office, where I can see the law in those shapes in which a young lawyer can alone see and practise it. It is years which make the counsellor. I have just read Persius. I value him little. My mind, like yours, is full of plans of study, few of which I am ever able to compass. My reflection calls up such a multitude of books unread, that I am lost,—like Spenser's Una and the Redcrosse Knight,— So many pathes, so many turnings seene, That which of them to take, in diverse doubt they been. The Faerie Queene. I wish to read the principal classics, particularly Latin ones. I fear I shall never reach the Greek. I have thought of Thucydides, the hardest but completest historian. I shall not touch him probably. Tell me your experiences of Herodotus. . . . From your true friend, C. S. To Jonathan F. Stearns, Bedford, Mass. Sunday eve, Aug.
Thucydides (search for this): chapter 5
t,— So many pathes, so many turnings seene, That which of them to take, in diverse doubt they been. The Faerie Queene. I wish to read the principal classics, particularly Latin ones. I fear I shall never reach the Greek. I have thought of Thucydides, the hardest but completest historian. I shall not touch him probably. Tell me your experiences of Herodotus. . . . From your true friend, C. S. To Jonathan F. Stearns, Bedford, Mass. Sunday eve, Aug. 7, 1831. my friend, my old Collountry. No more of this though. With Boston I shall leave all the little associations which turned aside my mind from its true course. In the way of classics, I wish to read Tacitus, Lucretius, Virgil, Ovid, Sallust, Cicero, Horace, Homer, Thucydides, and choice plays of the great tragedians. Do you start? I only say I wish to do it; but I mean to do it if impossibility is not written upon it. I wish also to reacquaint myself with political economy and intellectual philosophy. I find mys
L. V. Hubbard (search for this): chapter 5
he would have ample leisure to pursue his reading; but he was unwilling to separate himself from Boston and Cambridge, and declined the offer. In January, he taught for three weeks at Brookline, filling a temporary vacancy in the school of Mr. L. V. Hubbard (where his classmate McBurney was an usher), which was kept in a stone building modelled after the Greek style, and is still standing on Boylston Street. This brief experience as a school-teacher, while not attended with any unpleasant occu to transmute lead into gold. One o'clock at night! C. S. To Jonathan F. Stearns. Sunday, Feb. 13, 1881. my friend,—. . . I have for three weeks been trying to rear the tender thought, as an assistant to our old friend, McBurney, at Mr. Hubbard's school. Mr. H. had to go to Vermont, and he engaged me to assist in the duties of instruction during his absence. And oh!—quorum magna pars fui —the harassing, throat-cutting, mind-dissolving duties: pounding knowledge into heads which hav<
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