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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

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Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 5
ess. Tower wrote, June 5, I rejoice with you, Sumner, in your late success. I wish I could take yoll bear him well on in the track of honor. Sumner neglected no opportunity to listen to the bestay) evening at Quincy Hall. A few days later, Sumner went to Salem, as Browne's guest, and attendeds,—law-students and young lawyers. Among them Sumner was present. I recollect how delighted he wasght. Browne wrote to Stearns, May 23, 1831. Sumner feels unutterably on the subject, and he is prril 6, 1853 Works, Vol. III. pp. 212-214. Sumner and the classmates with whom he had been intimm; almost the only one. Macte nova virtute Sumner's letters to Tower and Stearns, which are presis thoughtful letter, which must have affected Sumner's immediate purpose, and probably his whole fues and books, andirons and paper, sunlight and Sumner; in short, a common resting-place for all the 3, 508-511, refers to Mr. Webster's course on this question. Your true friend, Charles Sumner.[19 more...]
Benjamin R. Curtis (search for this): chapter 5
defendant's counsel, and Mr. Webster are given in Commonwealth v. Knapp, 10 Pickering's Reports, p. 477. The celebrated argument of Mr. Webster on the earlier trial of John F. Knapp as principal is printed in his Works, Vol. II. pp. 41-105. See Curtis's Life of Webster, Vol. I. pp. 378-385. Rev. Dr. Emery, a classmate of Sumner, writes:— Immediately after graduating, I opened a private school in Beverly; and, while residing in that town, the great trial of Knapp, as an accomplice ofctual philosophy. I find myself nonplussed daily in my own reflections by my ignorance of these subjects. . . . J. Q. Adams has written a letter on Masonry. I will send it to you as soon as I can lay my hands upon it. Rumor says something on this may be expected soon from Webster. He is an Anti-mason, and in this I speak from more than report. Curtis's Life of Webster, Vol. I., pp. 391-393, 508-511, refers to Mr. Webster's course on this question. Your true friend, Charles Sumne
Browne Sterne (search for this): chapter 5
1853 Works, Vol. III. pp. 212-214. Sumner and the classmates with whom he had been intimate kept up their interest in each other. Gifts of books were interchanged. He gave a Byron to Browne, and a Milton to Hopkinson; and received from Browne Sterne's Sentimental Journey, and from Hopkinson a polyglot Bible. Sumner gave his classmate Kerr, in their Senior year in college, the Apothegms of Paulus Manutius, an edition printed in Venice in 1583. Having access to bookstores and libraries,. I fear that mathematics will yet conquer me. Browne appears in as good spirits as I ever knew him to be. I spent three days with him, the greater part of which time was spent both by him and myself in the court-room. While there, he gave me a Sterne's Sentimental Journey, neatly bound. . . . Your friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Boston, Dec. 8, 1830. Never, my friend, when the heavens have been dressed in their scorching robes of brass for weeks, was a drop of rain more grateful
picious. Macte! Walker's geometry, with its points, lines, angles, &c., is a good employment for an adept in mathematics, like yourself. ... Read your course of history by all means. If you mean to grapple with the law, dissect the feudal system. Your reading is a fortune. Stearns wrote, Oct. 8, Hopkinson tells me you are all absorbed in mathematics, and are making rapid progress in the study of that long neglected science. I am glad to hear this news. Tower wrote, Nov. 1, recommending Dibdin's Introduction to the Greek and Latin Classics, and said, I should certainly think it indispensable to every one who loves the old Latin and Greek writers and venerable tomes as you do, as soon as he begins to form his library. Soon after leaving college, Sumner sought an ushership in the Boston Latin School, but did not succeed in obtaining it. He was pressed by Stearns, then teaching an academy at Northfield, to become his assistant, and afterwards to take the sole charge of the institu
suppose, that fire and water would have embraced than mathematics and myself; but, strange to tell, we are close friends now. I really get geometry with some pleasure. I usually devote four hours in the forenoon to it. I have determined not to study any profession this year, and I have marked out to myself a course of study which will fully occupy my time,—namely, a course of mathematics, Juvenal, Tacitus, a course of modern history, Hallam's Middle Ages and Constitutional History, Roscoe's Leo and Lorenzo, and Robertson's Charles V.; with indefinite quantities of Shakspeare, Burton, British poets, &c., and writing an infinite number of long letters. I have doomed myself to hard labor, and I shall try to look upon labor as some great lawyer did, as pleasure,—Labor ipse voluptas. And the gratification from labor is, indeed, the surest and most steadfast pleasure. . . . President Quincy has been completely successful; has done himself, the city, the State, honor. Centennial Orati
D. Webster (search for this): chapter 5
e, honor. Centennial Oration, ante, p. 74. Webster, I understood, said it was the best discourseand lastly the huge leviathan of New England, Webster himself. He spoke but a few minutes, simply Quincy Hall was crowded to overflowing, and Mr. Webster concluded. His peroration brought to my mi displayed. I leave it to your imagination. Webster was followed by H. G. Otis, who spoke about ts a contrast to the bold, nervous delivery of Webster. He plainly showed that age had slackened hiciety for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge,—D. Webster, President, John Pickering, V. P.,—offered ae Shaw had finished the evening lecture) by Mr. Webster himself, in presence of the society, and fos something on this may be expected soon from Webster. He is an Anti-mason, and in this I speak from more than report. Curtis's Life of Webster, Vol. I., pp. 391-393, 508-511, refers to Mr. Web3, 508-511, refers to Mr. Webster's course on this question. Your true friend, Charles Sum
Harrison Gray Otis (search for this): chapter 5
r. Webster concluded. His peroration brought to my mind the admirable one in his speech in the Senate. Between every one of about the last four sentences he was greeted with three cheers by that immense audience; and when he had finished, with repeated cheers, wavings of hats, kerchiefs, &c. What a day of glory to him! I cannot paint the impression he made, neither can I the strong, convincing argument and eloquence he displayed. I leave it to your imagination. Webster was followed by H. G. Otis, who spoke about two hours, beautifully, of course. His voice was melodious and liquid; but the whole character of his oratory was a contrast to the bold, nervous delivery of Webster. He plainly showed that age had slackened his fires, and that he was no longer what he was twenty years ago, when he might almost be said to have Wielded at will the fierce democratie of Boston. The caucus of the Anti-tariffites was nothing. The result of these great exertions of the Tariffites was the
Francis Lieber (search for this): chapter 5
blic held a pledge of him, and other kindly words. Little thought the great orator that he was greeting one who was to succeed him in the Senate, with a longer term and, as time may show, a more enduring fame than his own. The prize was given in Lieber's Encyclopaedia Americana, valued at thirty dollars. The books were afterwards sent to Sumner, with a note signed by Mr. Webster, certifying that they were awarded as a premium for the essay. His classmates were greatly pleased with his succesudge Shaw had finished the evening lecture) by Mr. Webster himself, in presence of the society, and found to contain my name. I had to step out and receive some compliments from the godlike man, and the information that the society awarded to me Lieber's Encyclopaedia Americana, price thirty dollars. Surely the prize and praise were most easily gained. Mind you, I tell this with no vanity. It requires, though, the eye of a friend not to read in the foregoing lines a self-praising disposition.
Charles Pinckney (search for this): chapter 5
nas? Persius, Sat. V. 66, 67; quoted with reference to Tower's remissness in correspondence. . . . Your method and application are to me an assurance that the studies of the law office will be fruitful; but excuse the impertinence of a friend. I fear that Blackstone and his train will usurp your mind too much, to the exclusion of all cultivation of polite letters. The more I think of this last point, the more important it seems to me in the education of a lawyer. Study law hard, said Pinckney, but study polite letters as hard. So also says Story. The fact is, I look upon a mere lawyer, a reader of cases and cases alone, as one of the veriest wretches in the world. Dry items and facts, argumentative reports, and details of pleadings must incrust the mind with somewhat of their own rust. A lawyer must be a man of polish, with an omnium gatherum of knowledge. There is no branch of study or thought but what he can betimes summon to his aid, if his resources allow it. What is th
French Cicero (search for this): chapter 5
eed studied, or passed my eyes over books; but much of my time, and almost my whole mind, have been usurped by newspapers and politics. I have reached in anxiety for the latest reports from Washington, and watched the waters in their ebb and rise in different parts of the country. No more of this though. With Boston I shall leave all the little associations which turned aside my mind from its true course. In the way of classics, I wish to read Tacitus, Lucretius, Virgil, Ovid, Sallust, Cicero, Horace, Homer, Thucydides, and choice plays of the great tragedians. Do you start? I only say I wish to do it; but I mean to do it if impossibility is not written upon it. I wish also to reacquaint myself with political economy and intellectual philosophy. I find myself nonplussed daily in my own reflections by my ignorance of these subjects. . . . J. Q. Adams has written a letter on Masonry. I will send it to you as soon as I can lay my hands upon it. Rumor says something on this ma
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