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most, and dreaded to sunder ourselves from so many kindly associations. One month hath not a whit altered me; my mind is still full of those feelings of affection which bound me to the place and the friends I there enjoyed. I find it hard to untie the spell that knits me so strongly to college life. I never had a more melancholy time in my life than for the four hours after I last saw you. I went to my room, and found it usurped by a new race, and my furniture on the road to Boston. Like Noah's dove, then, with nowhere to rest the sole of my foot, I went from room to room, and saw everywhere the signs of approaching departure. Juniors were parading round, the almost undisputed lords and masters of what we Seniors a day before alone enjoyed. Excuse this sentimentality. Two days after you had read your dissertation, the fame whereof was in the land when I arrived, I underwent the most unwelcome drudgery of reading mine,—namely, of going through the form,—in order to satisfy th
ather to any further expense in his education. But while postponing the choice of a profession, he was not idle. He rose at quarter-past five in the morning, and retired at midnight, often later. Having no private room for the purpose, he used as a study one of the parlors, where he was much interrupted by the children. He took but little exercise, and did not go into society. His readings were, in the classics, Tacitus, Juvenal, Persius; in poetry and general literature, Shakspeare and Milton, Finished, Oct. 12. Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, The Correspondence of Gilbert Wakefield with Charles James Fox, Chiefly on Subjects of Classical Literature, Moore's Life of Byron, Butler's Reminiscences, Hume's Essays; and, in history, Hallam, Robertson, and Roscoe. He copied at great length into his commonplace-book—soon after laid aside—the narrations and reflections of these historians. He read both the Lorenzo de Medici and the Leo X. of Roscoe; and on completing the former, O
Franklin Dexter (search for this): chapter 5
; it is, he added, his greatest misfortune to be what he is, not where he is. Knapp was convicted and executed. The points contested at this trial between Franklin Dexter, the defendant's counsel, and Mr. Webster are given in Commonwealth v. Knapp, 10 Pickering's Reports, p. 477. The celebrated argument of Mr. Webster on the ea in Beverly; and, while residing in that town, the great trial of Knapp, as an accomplice of Crowninshield in the murder of Mr. White, took place in Salem. Mr. Franklin Dexter and Mr. W. H. Gardiner were Knapp's counsel, and Webster was on the side of the State. The trial attracted many from the neighboring towns,—law-students and young lawyers. Among them Sumner was present. I recollect how delighted he was with the keenness of Dexter in worming the truth out of witnesses on their cross-examination, and especially in summing up the evidence in the prisoner's behalf. I met him at the trial several times, and he seemed to take as much interest in it as
Alexander H. Everett (search for this): chapter 5
ter we should call a free pencil. . . . I know you will wish you were here during this last week. The election for member of Congress has taken place, and, as it turned upon the tariff and anti-tariff, it produced a considerable excitement. Nathan Appleton, father of Appleton in the present Senior class, was the tariff candidate, and Henry Lee the anti-tariff one, both merchants. The Tariffites held one caucus just a fortnight ago, at which Evarts, author of William Penn, J. B. Davis, A. H. Everett, J. T. Austin, Ben. Gorham (present Representative), and William Sullivan spoke; and lastly the huge leviathan of New England, Webster himself. He spoke but a few minutes, simply expressing his wish to address his fellow-citizens at length on this subject; and, as it was then late, moving an adjournment to Saturday, Oct. 30. On Saturday evening, the hall [Faneuil] was crowded to excess an hour before the time (to which the meeting adjourned) had arrived. Never had the Cradle of Liber
Hermanus Bleecker (search for this): chapter 5
ce with Browne, who was studying law with Rufus Choate at Salem; with Hopkinson, who was first a tutor at Cambridge and then a law-student at Groton; with Tower, who was teaching school at Waterville, N. Y., and afterwards studying law with Hermanus Bleecker, in Albany; and with Stearns and Frost,—who were teaching, the former at Northfield, and the latter at Framingham. The letters which they wrote to him are familiar and affectionate, usually addressing him by his Christian name, and most ofory of the Middle Ages. The book now lies open on the sofa, where I was lounging. My paper is before me, and pen in hand. The past has gone through my mind with its thronging associations. . . . You have quite introduced me to your master [Mr. Bleecker]. I should like him for his law, his literature; and should not dislike him for the singleness of his life. My own reflections though, and the advice of others, tell me that it is better to study with one whose business is other than that of
Thomas Hopkinson (search for this): chapter 5
lled it, on his favorite classmates, Browne, Hopkinson, Hopkinson wrote, May 10, Leave off readi He gave a Byron to Browne, and a Milton to Hopkinson; and received from Browne Sterne's Sentimental Journey, and from Hopkinson a polyglot Bible. Sumner gave his classmate Kerr, in their Seniors to Browne. Of the letters to Browne and Hopkinson, the two classmates to whom he wrote most co unhappy; and he opened his heart frankly to Hopkinson, —a young man of mature reflection and six ytter stored than that of any of your class. Hopkinson rebuked Sumner's apprehension of failure in tame world and this tame reality of things. Hopkinson thus closed this thoughtful letter, which mun to the meeting-house, in which our friend Hopkinson walked amongst the corporation, professors, ock, when, as I was ascending the steps with Hopkinson, Browne presented himself before us. The exhg for which they need blush. McBurney and Hopkinson were here last evening, and spent in my room[4 more...]
Henry Lee (search for this): chapter 5
on was over half an hour in length. It was marked by a plenitude of thought and a strength of expression, and showed an ease of composition, which in a painter we should call a free pencil. . . . I know you will wish you were here during this last week. The election for member of Congress has taken place, and, as it turned upon the tariff and anti-tariff, it produced a considerable excitement. Nathan Appleton, father of Appleton in the present Senior class, was the tariff candidate, and Henry Lee the anti-tariff one, both merchants. The Tariffites held one caucus just a fortnight ago, at which Evarts, author of William Penn, J. B. Davis, A. H. Everett, J. T. Austin, Ben. Gorham (present Representative), and William Sullivan spoke; and lastly the huge leviathan of New England, Webster himself. He spoke but a few minutes, simply expressing his wish to address his fellow-citizens at length on this subject; and, as it was then late, moving an adjournment to Saturday, Oct. 30. On Sa
John Pickering (search for this): chapter 5
seful Knowledge,—a society formed after the example of the famous English association. Its president at that time was Daniel Webster, and its vice-president, John Pickering. The society gave public notice that, on April 1, the envelope corresponding to the manuscript which had been approved as the best would be opened at the Atcted and executed. The points contested at this trial between Franklin Dexter, the defendant's counsel, and Mr. Webster are given in Commonwealth v. Knapp, 10 Pickering's Reports, p. 477. The celebrated argument of Mr. Webster on the earlier trial of John F. Knapp as principal is printed in his Works, Vol. II. pp. 41-105. See Ceat I did, which I now tell in the fulness of friendship rather than vanity. The Boston Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge,—D. Webster, President, John Pickering, V. P.,—offered a premium in books to the author (a minor) of the best dissertation on any thing relating to commerce, trade, and manufactures, to be handed u<
the aisles, standing up during all the two performances, about three hours. The first part of Quincy's oration, I thought, was not well digested; but he grew better and better the more he got heated with his subject, and held the attention of the audience better the last hour than he did the first. His vindication of the bigotry and intolerance of our ancestors was the best I ever heard, and was too good for them. His delivery, also, was fine,—full, loud, energetic, frequently eloquent. Sprague's poem was beautiful; its most prominent parts were on the Indians. There was an immense procession to the meeting-house, in which our friend Hopkinson walked amongst the corporation, professors, and tutors of Harvard University. . . . I should have liked to roam round with you through those New York bookstores. In fact, a bookstore or a library is my paradise. I have been doing something here, as you did in New York, to invest my prize-money; and, depend upon it, I often sighed from
William Kent (search for this): chapter 5
e world. You will transact business; and get initiated into those perplexities which, sooner or later, all of the sons of Adam must meet. You will confirm yourself in a knowledge of the world, and wear off the academic rust with which exclusive students are covered. Time will allow you, I know (for I know you will lose no time), to prosecute your law with profit; and you will find in your newly assumed cares a grateful change, perhaps, from the abstract speculations in which Blackstone and Kent and Fearne will engage you. And more than all, you will have the consciousness that you are forwarding the wishes of your father, and giving up your time, perhaps, that it may be added to his days. It is now two days before Commencement. I am stiff in the determination to commence the coming year in the study of law at Cambridge. . . . I intend to give myself to the law, so as to read satisfactorily the regular and parallel courses, to take hold of some of the classics,—Greek, if I can po
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