hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 918 2 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 302 0 Browse Search
George S. Hillard 221 1 Browse Search
W. W. Story 176 0 Browse Search
William W. Story 154 0 Browse Search
France (France) 154 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 134 0 Browse Search
Simon Greenleaf 129 11 Browse Search
Francis Lieber 112 16 Browse Search
Jonathan French 98 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 364 total hits in 140 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
The Common (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
your table Juvenal, one of the first poets and moralists the world ever saw, the Roman Shakspeare in the ripeness of his thoughts and the strength of his expressions, in his expanded views of human nature and intensity of conception. Juvenal I shall make my Latin text-book; I study him every afternoon, reading about one hundred lines at a time. I frequently find it hard to unfold his meaning; but the richness of the fruit will repay any labor in gathering. . . . I have just read Fox and Wakefield's Correspondence, Chiefly on Subjects of Classical Literature. How could a man in Fox's situation, with so many diverse and enfolding cares, surrender himself so devotedly to the study of the classics, rivalling an old scholiast in astuteness and critical inquiry, and seemingly as conversant with all as any man who had made them the study of his life? And yet this man was then employed upon a portion of English history, and was supporting the Atlantean weight of a party which held divide
Albany (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nisters of this State, initiated in 1790. . . . A gentleman told me he had conversed with J. Q. Adams, and he said he was opposed to all secret societies, and should like to assist in removing the secrecy from the *f. B. K. It will not hurt it; it will benefit it. There is nothing for which they need blush. McBurney and Hopkinson were here last evening, and spent in my room a kind of old college evening. I shall expect to pass a like time with you soon. C. S. To Charlemagne Tower, Albany, N. Y. Boston, Friday Evening, May 27, 1831. Quid? quasi magnum Nempe diem donas? Persius, Sat. V. 66, 67; quoted with reference to Tower's remissness in correspondence. . . . Your method and application are to me an assurance that the studies of the law office will be fruitful; but excuse the impertinence of a friend. I fear that Blackstone and his train will usurp your mind too much, to the exclusion of all cultivation of polite letters. The more I think of this last point, the mo
Waterville, N.Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
g law with Rufus Choate at Salem; with Hopkinson, who was first a tutor at Cambridge and then a law-student at Groton; with Tower, who was teaching school at Waterville, N. Y., and afterwards studying law with Hermanus Bleecker, in Albany; and with Stearns and Frost,—who were teaching, the former at Northfield, and the latter at Frnhood had now come with its work and duties, and he entered upon it in a serious and resolute spirit. Letters to classmates. To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Boston, Sept. 27, 1830. Scene.—Fourth-story, House 53 Hancock Street, half-past 10 in the evening. my friend,— Truditur dies die, Novaeque perguntiterature; all of them shall meet my encounter. Methinks I must read some of the Greek tragedians. . . . Your friend truly, C. S To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Boston, Monday Evening, Aug. 29, 1831. my dear friend,—. . . I can fully sympathize in your feelings arising from the severance from your studies. To
Groton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Sentimental Journey, and from Hopkinson a polyglot Bible. Sumner gave his classmate Kerr, in their Senior year in college, the Apothegms of Paulus Manutius, an edition printed in Venice in 1583. Having access to bookstores and libraries, he was often the agent of his classmates in borrowing and purchasing books. He maintained a frequent correspondence with Browne, who was studying law with Rufus Choate at Salem; with Hopkinson, who was first a tutor at Cambridge and then a law-student at Groton; with Tower, who was teaching school at Waterville, N. Y., and afterwards studying law with Hermanus Bleecker, in Albany; and with Stearns and Frost,—who were teaching, the former at Northfield, and the latter at Framingham. The letters which they wrote to him are familiar and affectionate, usually addressing him by his Christian name, and most of them quite extended. Of these he kept during his life more than fifty, written from Sept., 1830, to Sept., 1831. Once a week, or oftener, he
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
iah Quincy's address in the Old South Church, in commemoration of the close of the second century from the first settlement of Boston. An account of this occasion, with an extract from the address, is given in Mr. Quincy's Life, pp. 443-448. He attended a course of lectures given under the auspices of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. Among the lectures, of which he wrote out full notes, were those of Judge Davis on Natural History, James T. Austin on the History of Massachusetts, and John Pierpont on Useful Knowledge the Ally of Religion. The great orator of the period, Daniel Webster, was then in his prime. Aspiring young men spared no pains to obtain sitting or standing room at political meetings and in court-rooms where he was to speak. Sumner, accompanied by Browne, who came from Salem for the purpose, heard Webster's tariff speech, which was begun at Faneuil Hall, Oct. 30, and concluded the next (Sunday) evening at Quincy Hall. A few days later, Sumne
Quincy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
incy has been completely successful; has done himself, the city, the State, honor. Centennial Oration, ante, p. 74. Webster, I understood, said it was the best discourse he ever heard from a pulpit in his life. It was two hours long; the whole of this time he held the attention of a most numerous audience, among whom was myself, squeezed and pushed round amidst the crowd of groundlings in one of the aisles, standing up during all the two performances, about three hours. The first part of Quincy's oration, I thought, was not well digested; but he grew better and better the more he got heated with his subject, and held the attention of the audience better the last hour than he did the first. His vindication of the bigotry and intolerance of our ancestors was the best I ever heard, and was too good for them. His delivery, also, was fine,—full, loud, energetic, frequently eloquent. Sprague's poem was beautiful; its most prominent parts were on the Indians. There was an immense proc
Northfield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
in the Boston Latin School, but did not succeed in obtaining it. He was pressed by Stearns, then teaching an academy at Northfield, to become his assistant, and afterwards to take the sole charge of the institution; the latter urging that, with his aafterwards studying law with Hermanus Bleecker, in Albany; and with Stearns and Frost,—who were teaching, the former at Northfield, and the latter at Framingham. The letters which they wrote to him are familiar and affectionate, usually addressing hoquence relished well, and with no one better than myself. . . . Your friend, Sumner. To Jonathan F. Stearns, Northfield, Mass. Boston, Nov. 24, 1830. my friend,—Here I am fairly located in house No. 20, Hancock Street, on the opposite sidut when I say that these roots, when obtained, are but bitter. If I had accepted your kind invitation and posted up to Northfield, it would have been a month before I could have got my mind again into the right train to have prosecuted all the studi
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ngress has taken place, and, as it turned upon the tariff and anti-tariff, it produced a considerable excitement. Nathan Appleton, father of Appleton in the present Senior class, was the tariff candidate, and Henry Lee the anti-tariff one, both merchants. The Tariffites held one caucus just a fortnight ago, at which Evarts, author of William Penn, J. B. Davis, A. H. Everett, J. T. Austin, Ben. Gorham (present Representative), and William Sullivan spoke; and lastly the huge leviathan of New England, Webster himself. He spoke but a few minutes, simply expressing his wish to address his fellow-citizens at length on this subject; and, as it was then late, moving an adjournment to Saturday, Oct. 30. On Saturday evening, the hall [Faneuil] was crowded to excess an hour before the time (to which the meeting adjourned) had arrived. Never had the Cradle of Liberty more within its sides than on that evening. He spoke three and a half hours, and then had not concluded his remarks; when th
Framingham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
res and libraries, he was often the agent of his classmates in borrowing and purchasing books. He maintained a frequent correspondence with Browne, who was studying law with Rufus Choate at Salem; with Hopkinson, who was first a tutor at Cambridge and then a law-student at Groton; with Tower, who was teaching school at Waterville, N. Y., and afterwards studying law with Hermanus Bleecker, in Albany; and with Stearns and Frost,—who were teaching, the former at Northfield, and the latter at Framingham. The letters which they wrote to him are familiar and affectionate, usually addressing him by his Christian name, and most of them quite extended. Of these he kept during his life more than fifty, written from Sept., 1830, to Sept., 1831. Once a week, or oftener, he sent long letters to Browne. Of the letters to Browne and Hopkinson, the two classmates to whom he wrote most confidentially, none exist; but the letters written to him at that period were carefully preserved by him. Br
Venice (Italy) (search for this): chapter 5
the American people. Speech in the Senate, April 6, 1853 Works, Vol. III. pp. 212-214. Sumner and the classmates with whom he had been intimate kept up their interest in each other. Gifts of books were interchanged. He gave a Byron to Browne, and a Milton to Hopkinson; and received from Browne Sterne's Sentimental Journey, and from Hopkinson a polyglot Bible. Sumner gave his classmate Kerr, in their Senior year in college, the Apothegms of Paulus Manutius, an edition printed in Venice in 1583. Having access to bookstores and libraries, he was often the agent of his classmates in borrowing and purchasing books. He maintained a frequent correspondence with Browne, who was studying law with Rufus Choate at Salem; with Hopkinson, who was first a tutor at Cambridge and then a law-student at Groton; with Tower, who was teaching school at Waterville, N. Y., and afterwards studying law with Hermanus Bleecker, in Albany; and with Stearns and Frost,—who were teaching, the former a
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...