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Bedford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
, that I am lost,—like Spenser's Una and the Redcrosse Knight,— So many pathes, so many turnings seene, That which of them to take, in diverse doubt they been. The Faerie Queene. I wish to read the principal classics, particularly Latin ones. I fear I shall never reach the Greek. I have thought of Thucydides, the hardest but completest historian. I shall not touch him probably. Tell me your experiences of Herodotus. . . . From your true friend, C. S. To Jonathan F. Stearns, Bedford, Mass. Sunday eve, Aug. 7, 1831. my friend, my old College Fiend,—. . . You ask if I hold fast to Anti-masonry? When I do not, pronounce me a recreant. I hold fast to it through some ridicule, and, I dare say, slurs upon my sense. Truth has ever been reviled when she first appeared, whether as the bearer of a glorious system of religion, or of the laws which govern this universe. Time is her great friend. I do not hardly understand from your letter whether you join with me or no. Dr. B<
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ve trod the primrose, and you the thorny, path. . . . There is no railway to fame. Labor, labor must be before our eyes; nay, more, its necessity must sink deep in our hearts. This is the most potent alchemy to transmute lead into gold. One o'clock at night! C. S. To Jonathan F. Stearns. Sunday, Feb. 13, 1881. my friend,—. . . I have for three weeks been trying to rear the tender thought, as an assistant to our old friend, McBurney, at Mr. Hubbard's school. Mr. H. had to go to Vermont, and he engaged me to assist in the duties of instruction during his absence. And oh!—quorum magna pars fui —the harassing, throat-cutting, mind-dissolving duties: pounding knowledge into heads which have no appetency for it, and enduring the arguing of urchin boys, and all those other ills to which schoolmaster-flesh is heir. . . . But the cares of Mr. H.'s school are more severe than those of most schools, on account of the want of classification in the boys, and the being obliged to dru<
Ovid (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ess. I have indeed studied, or passed my eyes over books; but much of my time, and almost my whole mind, have been usurped by newspapers and politics. I have reached in anxiety for the latest reports from Washington, and watched the waters in their ebb and rise in different parts of the country. No more of this though. With Boston I shall leave all the little associations which turned aside my mind from its true course. In the way of classics, I wish to read Tacitus, Lucretius, Virgil, Ovid, Sallust, Cicero, Horace, Homer, Thucydides, and choice plays of the great tragedians. Do you start? I only say I wish to do it; but I mean to do it if impossibility is not written upon it. I wish also to reacquaint myself with political economy and intellectual philosophy. I find myself nonplussed daily in my own reflections by my ignorance of these subjects. . . . J. Q. Adams has written a letter on Masonry. I will send it to you as soon as I can lay my hands upon it. Rumor says some
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ourt-rooms where he was to speak. Sumner, accompanied by Browne, who came from Salem for the purpose, heard Webster's tariff speech, which was begun at Faneuil Hallded the next (Sunday) evening at Quincy Hall. A few days later, Sumner went to Salem, as Browne's guest, and attended the trial of Joseph J. Knapp, as accessory to pp, as an accomplice of Crowninshield in the murder of Mr. White, took place in Salem. Mr. Franklin Dexter and Mr. W. H. Gardiner were Knapp's counsel, and Webster frequent correspondence with Browne, who was studying law with Rufus Choate at Salem; with Hopkinson, who was first a tutor at Cambridge and then a law-student at Giliar in men's mouths. The following passage I transcribe from a letter of our Salem friend [Browne]. You know he does not calculate highly on puny geniuses. Speakng you occasionally. For the last month, the thoughts of moving and a visit to Salem to see John, Browne. and attend the notorious trials, completely filled my m
Brookline (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ege, Sumner sought an ushership in the Boston Latin School, but did not succeed in obtaining it. He was pressed by Stearns, then teaching an academy at Northfield, to become his assistant, and afterwards to take the sole charge of the institution; the latter urging that, with his attainments in the classics, he would have ample leisure to pursue his reading; but he was unwilling to separate himself from Boston and Cambridge, and declined the offer. In January, he taught for three weeks at Brookline, filling a temporary vacancy in the school of Mr. L. V. Hubbard (where his classmate McBurney was an usher), which was kept in a stone building modelled after the Greek style, and is still standing on Boylston Street. This brief experience as a school-teacher, while not attended with any unpleasant occurrence, did not give him a taste for the occupation. In the latter part of December he composed an essay on commerce, the subject of a prize, limited to minors, which had been offered by
Milton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
r oftener, he sent long letters to Browne. Of the letters to Browne and Hopkinson, the two classmates to whom he wrote most confidentially, none exist; but the letters written to him at that period were carefully preserved by him. Browne was fearless in his treatment of received opinions, but his radical notions were under the control of good sense. The two friends discussed political topics, like Masonry, and the public men of the day; literary themes, like the characters of Shakspeare, Milton's poetry, and Moore's Biography of Byron; Hallam's History of the Middle Ages, and the historical characters of Francis I. and Charles V. They criticised for mutual improvement each other's style of writing so plainly and unreservedly, that only their assured confidence in each other's sincerity and friendliness prevented their keen words from leaving a sting behind. Sumner thought Browne's style Byronic, and invited a criticism of his own. Browne, while appreciating Sumner's as one which
David Robertson (search for this): chapter 5
ished, Oct. 12. Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, The Correspondence of Gilbert Wakefield with Charles James Fox, Chiefly on Subjects of Classical Literature, Moore's Life of Byron, Butler's Reminiscences, Hume's Essays; and, in history, Hallam, Robertson, and Roscoe. He copied at great length into his commonplace-book—soon after laid aside—the narrations and reflections of these historians. He read both the Lorenzo de Medici and the Leo X. of Roscoe; and on completing the former, Oct. 29, hear, and I have marked out to myself a course of study which will fully occupy my time,—namely, a course of mathematics, Juvenal, Tacitus, a course of modern history, Hallam's Middle Ages and Constitutional History, Roscoe's Leo and Lorenzo, and Robertson's Charles V.; with indefinite quantities of Shakspeare, Burton, British poets, &c., and writing an infinite number of long letters. I have doomed myself to hard labor, and I shall try to look upon labor as some great lawyer did, as pleasure,—
John W. Browne (search for this): chapter 5
s augur well of his coming years. Persevere! Browne wrote, Sept. 28, You have begun well. Quarterr. Therefore, on! on! Follow your spirit. Browne wrote, in reference to the prize, to Stearns, where he was to speak. Sumner, accompanied by Browne, who came from Salem for the purpose, heard Wel. A few days later, Sumner went to Salem, as Browne's guest, and attended the trial of Joseph J. Kf books were interchanged. He gave a Byron to Browne, and a Milton to Hopkinson; and received from He maintained a frequent correspondence with Browne, who was studying law with Rufus Choate at Salce a week, or oftener, he sent long letters to Browne. Of the letters to Browne and Hopkinson, thBrowne and Hopkinson, the two classmates to whom he wrote most confidentially, none exist; but the letters written to him ats from leaving a sting behind. Sumner thought Browne's style Byronic, and invited a criticism of his own. Browne, while appreciating Sumner's as one which every man not a critic and many who are woul[9 more...]
Charles James Fox (search for this): chapter 5
; in poetry and general literature, Shakspeare and Milton, Finished, Oct. 12. Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, The Correspondence of Gilbert Wakefield with Charles James Fox, Chiefly on Subjects of Classical Literature, Moore's Life of Byron, Butler's Reminiscences, Hume's Essays; and, in history, Hallam, Robertson, and Roscoe. e hundred lines at a time. I frequently find it hard to unfold his meaning; but the richness of the fruit will repay any labor in gathering. . . . I have just read Fox and Wakefield's Correspondence, Chiefly on Subjects of Classical Literature. How could a man in Fox's situation, with so many diverse and enfolding cares, surrendeFox's situation, with so many diverse and enfolding cares, surrender himself so devotedly to the study of the classics, rivalling an old scholiast in astuteness and critical inquiry, and seemingly as conversant with all as any man who had made them the study of his life? And yet this man was then employed upon a portion of English history, and was supporting the Atlantean weight of a party which
Benjamin Gorham (search for this): chapter 5
cil. . . . I know you will wish you were here during this last week. The election for member of Congress has taken place, and, as it turned upon the tariff and anti-tariff, it produced a considerable excitement. Nathan Appleton, father of Appleton in the present Senior class, was the tariff candidate, and Henry Lee the anti-tariff one, both merchants. The Tariffites held one caucus just a fortnight ago, at which Evarts, author of William Penn, J. B. Davis, A. H. Everett, J. T. Austin, Ben. Gorham (present Representative), and William Sullivan spoke; and lastly the huge leviathan of New England, Webster himself. He spoke but a few minutes, simply expressing his wish to address his fellow-citizens at length on this subject; and, as it was then late, moving an adjournment to Saturday, Oct. 30. On Saturday evening, the hall [Faneuil] was crowded to excess an hour before the time (to which the meeting adjourned) had arrived. Never had the Cradle of Liberty more within its sides than
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