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ung men, it is not prophetic of future distinction. One passage is interesting, when read in the light of his subsequent career:– Times like these (when revolutions become necessary) call for the exertions of the truly brave man. The good citizen may revolt at violence and outrage, and all the calamities which thicken upon a people divided with itself; but if he be true to his country, he will incur the risk for the prize in store. For surely, to every good and peaceable citizen, said Milton, Reason of Church Government urged against Prelatry. himself an actor in scenes like these to which I am referring, it must in nature needs be a hateful thing to be the displeaser and molester of thousands. But when God commands to take the trumpet and blow a dolorous or a jarring blast, it lies not in man's will what he shall say or what he shall conceal. The question is one upon which hangs the prosperity and happiness of his country for years to come. A great battle is to be fought;
in. The whole Review smacks strongly of the place of its publication. The article on Professor Stuart's classics By Professor James L. Kingsley, of Yale College. is rather a celebrated one; has excited much comment; is thought to be one of the most thorough and searching reviews (strictly reviews, for it is not a talk round about and about its subject) that has ever appeared in our country. Preparations are making to receive General Jackson with the same college ceremonies with which Monroe was received,—namely, an address in English from the President, and a Latin address from the first scholar of the Senior Class,—Bowen. Professor Francis Bowen. Believe me your faithful friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Dane Law College, Monday, July 15, 1833. . . . If you want a book which will be a light law-book, and a most instructive work as to the government under which we live, which shall be entertaining and informing, written in a more brilliant and elementary, though
credit may be my lot, prevent. . .. I wrote a Bowdoin dissertation on the subject which I mentioned in my last to you as uppermost in my mind. I commenced one evening, and a fortnight after I wrote the last sentence,—some fifty pages. During all the while I attended closely to the exercises of the school. . . . Your affectionate friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Cambridge, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 1832 my dear friend,—... Yesterday, Dane Law College (situated just north of Rev. Mr. Newell's church), a beautiful Grecian temple, with four Ionic pillars in front,—the most architectural and the best-built edifice belonging to the college,—was dedicated to the law. Quincy delivered a most proper address of an hour, full of his strong sense and strong language. Webster, J. Q. Adams, Dr. Bowditch, Edward Everett, Jeremiah Mason, Judge Story, Ticknor, leaders in the eloquence, statesmanship, mathematics, scholarship, and law of our good land, were all present,—a glorious com
Samuel Osgood (search for this): chapter 6
y Hall, which was used for commons. The first meeting was held March 6, and the officers were chosen March 14. Mercantile Journal, March 16, 1833. Sumner was chosen President; Abiel A. Livermore, of the Divinity School, Vice-President; and Samuel Osgood, of the Divinity School, Secretary. Among the members of the Executive Committee were Barzillai Frost, of the Divinity School, and Richard H. Dana, Jr., of the Sophomore Class. Public meetings were held in the City Hall, or one of the churcng officer of the society, writes:— A peculiar life-and-death earnestness characterized even then all that Sumner did and said. His voice had a trumpet tone, and he was a good leader to rally under; but temperance was not popular. Rev. Dr. Osgood, of New York, also writes:— Sumner was then a law-student, and I saw a good deal of him. He talked much of ethics and international law. He had great strength of conviction on ethical subjects and decided religious principle; yet he wa
Henry W. Paine (search for this): chapter 6
ffice, advanced to the Middle Class; with Wendell Phillips, who, graduating from college a year later than Sumner, now entered with him the Junior Class; with Henry W. Paine, of Winslow, Me., Mr. Paine practised his profession for several years in Hallowell, Me., and removed, in 1854, to Boston, where he is still one of the leaMr. Paine practised his profession for several years in Hallowell, Me., and removed, in 1854, to Boston, where he is still one of the leaders of the bar. who entered Sumner's class in the spring of 1832, and whose acquaintance he then made; and with his classmate Hopkinson, who joined the school in the autumn of that year. Among other friends in the Law School were Charles C. Converse and George Gibbs. Converse became a judge of the Supreme Court of the State ofn. . . . As to your despondency, or whatever other name you please to give it, take exercise!—exercise!—exercise!—and it will vanish like the morning dew. Henry W. Paine, having left the Law School, wrote from Winslow, Me., March 12, 1833:— There is not one among my friends in whom I feel a more lively interest, whose p
John G. Palfrey (search for this): chapter 6
mons. The first meeting was held March 6, and the officers were chosen March 14. Mercantile Journal, March 16, 1833. Sumner was chosen President; Abiel A. Livermore, of the Divinity School, Vice-President; and Samuel Osgood, of the Divinity School, Secretary. Among the members of the Executive Committee were Barzillai Frost, of the Divinity School, and Richard H. Dana, Jr., of the Sophomore Class. Public meetings were held in the City Hall, or one of the churches; at one of which Rev. John G. Palfrey delivered an impressive address, still well remembered for its effective reference to graduates of the college who had fallen victims to the vice. He then, for the first time, met Sumner, who presided; and was attracted by his manly presence and genial smile. In the autumn of 1833, Sumner invited George S. Hillard to repeat before the society a temperance lecture which he had delivered in other places. Rev. A. A. Livermore, of Meadville, Penn., a living officer of the society, wr
J. J. Park (search for this): chapter 6
American Jurist, a law periodical which maintained a high rank, and numbered among its contributors Theron Metcalf, Simon Greenleaf, Luther S. Cushing, George S. Hillard, and Dr. I. Ray. Some of its series of articles—notably, Judge Metcalf's on Contracts—afterwards grew into treatises. Willard Phillips—author of the treatise on The Law of Insurance—was the editor. Sumner's first contribution was to the number for July, 1833,—a notice of a lecture before King's College, London, by Professor J. J. Park, on Courts of Equity. Vol. X. pp. 227-237. The English professor died shortly after, too soon to read this notice of his lecture. The article defines at some length and with happy illustrations the distinction between law and equity, then much misconceived. Judge Story noted it, in his Equity Jurisprudence, as a forcible exposition of the prevalent errors on the subject, and as full of useful comment and research. Vol. I. § 23, note. It is a thoughtful and well-written pape
ation, was carefully done and much approved at the time. It contains, besides the list of books, an interesting sketch of the growth of the library, and of the gifts of the second Thomas Hollis, of Lincoln's Inn, which was republished in the American Jurist. Jan., 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 263-268. In 1833, he contributed two articles to the American Monthly Review: April and May. one, a review of the impeachment trials before the Senate of the United States, and particularly that of Judge Peck; and the other, a notice of an edition of Blackstone's Commentaries, with special reference to the notes of Christian and Chitty. Browne wrote to him in relation to the former article:— It is learned without a show of learning. To have been able to accomplish such a matter is no small subject of rejoicing. I am glad to see you grow. You have improved your style in proportions and muscle. It bears in that article a favorable comparison with a strong, healthy, well-built man. Did
rotection. I strive to forget my loss in an increased regard for the living. . . . Let me then remind you (of what I know there is no need of reminding you) that the cares and honors of your father's house devolve upon you. Serve all as you have served him. I have written with the freedom of a friend who takes an unfeigned interest in you and yours. Death, this winter, has glutted himself among those to whom my acquaintance and regards extended, more than in all the rest of my life. Penniman, our classmate, died,—a calm and easy death, unconscious that he was sinking into a sleep longer than that of a night. Yesterday's paper told me of the death of Hale, from New York, who graduated the year after we did. What death may come next,—who can tell? . . . I have thought but little of the Bowdoin subjects, and it is from now just a month when the dissertations must be handed in. If I write at all, it will be upon the second subject. I shall choose that, because it will require
ition of Blackstone's Commentaries, with special reference to the notes of Christian and Chitty. Browne wrote to him in relation to the former article:— It is learned without a show of learning. To have been able to accomplish such a matter is no small subject of rejoicing. I am glad to see you grow. You have improved your style in proportions and muscle. It bears in that article a favorable comparison with a strong, healthy, well-built man. Did you get that Latin quotation from Persius? That was the only thing I would ask to strike out. It was far-fetched, knotty, and hard to be translated. Near the close of his second year in the Law School, he began to write for the American Jurist, a law periodical which maintained a high rank, and numbered among its contributors Theron Metcalf, Simon Greenleaf, Luther S. Cushing, George S. Hillard, and Dr. I. Ray. Some of its series of articles—notably, Judge Metcalf's on Contracts—afterwards grew into treatises. Willard Philli<
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