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Wendell Phillips (search for this): chapter 6
, who, entering at the same time, was, on account of a year's study in an office, advanced to the Middle Class; with Wendell Phillips, who, graduating from college a year later than Sumner, now entered with him the Junior Class; with Henry W. Paine, 120. With each of these he discussed common studies and plans of life, in his room and in occasional walks. Sumner and Phillips had been fellow-students, though in different classes, at the Latin School and in college; but their familiar acquaintance dates from their connection with the Law School. Mr. Phillips is the author of the sketch of Sumner in Johnson's Encyclopaedia. Sumner had now attained the full height of his manhood,— six feet and two inches. He was tall and gaunt, weighinec. 13, 1832; and Jan. 14, Feb. 18, June 5, July 5, and Oct. 20, 1833. are preserved. In Feb., 1833, he maintained (Wendell Phillips being of counsel on the other side) the negative of the question, whether a Scotch bond, assignable by the law of Sc
Willard Phillips (search for this): chapter 6
om Persius? That was the only thing I would ask to strike out. It was far-fetched, knotty, and hard to be translated. Near the close of his second year in the Law School, he began to write for the American Jurist, a law periodical which maintained a high rank, and numbered among its contributors Theron Metcalf, Simon Greenleaf, Luther S. Cushing, George S. Hillard, and Dr. I. Ray. Some of its series of articles—notably, Judge Metcalf's on Contracts—afterwards grew into treatises. Willard Phillips—author of the treatise on The Law of Insurance—was the editor. Sumner's first contribution was to the number for July, 1833,—a notice of a lecture before King's College, London, by Professor J. J. Park, on Courts of Equity. Vol. X. pp. 227-237. The English professor died shortly after, too soon to read this notice of his lecture. The article defines at some length and with happy illustrations the distinction between law and equity, then much misconceived. Judge Story noted it, i
John S. Popkin (search for this): chapter 6
nduced to come to the performances, I hope I shall be able to snatch as good a meal elsewhere, away from the press and turmoil incident to a public dinner. To do the table justice, it was tolerably well served, and we had quite a pleasant time in divesting it of its many dishes. Of our classmates who were here, few or none had undergone any alteration. They looked and talked the same as when we met one another every day in social and intellectual communion .... Need I say that Everett did wonders on Phi Beta day? Mr. Everett repeated on this occasion, Aug. 29, the oration on the Education of Mankind, which he had delivered, Aug. 20, at Yale College. Orations and Speeches by Edward Everett, Vol. I. pp. 404-441. Popkin has resigned. Felton will probably be his successor. Thank you for reading my article in the Jurist; but I want you to make allowances for the haste in which it was composed, and more for the inaccuracy with which it is printed. Your faithful friend, C. S.
Josiah Quincy (search for this): chapter 6
marks of haste in composition, and is marred by digressions and wanting in compactness. President Quincy wrote him a note, requesting an interview in relation to the dissertation,—with what partic interest in him almost equal to that of their husbands. His friendship with the family of President Quincy, which began at this period, remained unbroken through life; and from them, in all the vicipreciative of women of superior refinement and excellence. Mrs. Waterston, a daughter of President Quincy, writes:— Charles Sumner entered his Senior year in 1830. The son of an old friend oost architectural and the best-built edifice belonging to the college,—was dedicated to the law. Quincy delivered a most proper address of an hour, full of his strong sense and strong language. Websthat have been wrought,—trees planted, common fenced, new buildings raised, and others designed. Quincy is a man of life, and infuses a vigor into all that he touches. Commencement Day,—it was a
ars in that article a favorable comparison with a strong, healthy, well-built man. Did you get that Latin quotation from Persius? That was the only thing I would ask to strike out. It was far-fetched, knotty, and hard to be translated. Near the close of his second year in the Law School, he began to write for the American Jurist, a law periodical which maintained a high rank, and numbered among its contributors Theron Metcalf, Simon Greenleaf, Luther S. Cushing, George S. Hillard, and Dr. I. Ray. Some of its series of articles—notably, Judge Metcalf's on Contracts—afterwards grew into treatises. Willard Phillips—author of the treatise on The Law of Insurance—was the editor. Sumner's first contribution was to the number for July, 1833,—a notice of a lecture before King's College, London, by Professor J. J. Park, on Courts of Equity. Vol. X. pp. 227-237. The English professor died shortly after, too soon to read this notice of his lecture. The article defines at some length
William Roscoe (search for this): chapter 6
absorbing devotion. The tone of his letters changed perceptibly at this time; no longer light and sportive as before, they are altogether serious, and relate chiefly to his studies, with only brief references to the incidents of college life and tidings from classmates. Shortly after he entered the Law School, he procured a Lawyer's Commonplace-Book, in which he wrote out tables of English kings and lord-chancellors, with dates of reigns and terms; sketches of lawyers, drawn largely from Roscoe's Lives; extracts from Sir Matthew Hale's History of the Common Law; and the definitions and incidents of Estates, as laid down by Blackstone. The list of books read by him at the school, as noted in his commonplace-books, is remarkable for its wide range, and begins with this memorandum and extract from Coke's First Institute: Law reading commenced Sept., 1831, at Cambridge. Holding this for an undoubted verity, that there is no knowledge, case, or point in law, seeme it of never so lit
William C. Russell (search for this): chapter 6
on his election to the State Senate, not knowing that he had been defeated. His mind was wholly absorbed in other pursuits, which, perhaps unconsciously to himself, were preparing him for the lofty stand he attained in after life. Professor William C. Russell, of Cornell University, who saw much of Sumner at Cambridge in 1832-33, writes: — He was a tall, thin, bent, ungainly law-student; his eyes were inflamed by late reading, and his complexion showed that he was careless of exercinted, though very slightly, with Fanny Kemble, as we boys used to call her. He was, as much as any of us, infatuated by her acting; and I remember his one day stopping me in the street, and drawing me out of the thoroughfare, and saying, Come, Russell, tell me something about Fanny Kemble, with all the interest of a lover. His personal kindness never ceased while I remained at Cambridge, and he helped me on one occasion when I needed a friend, with the tenderness of a girl. When I left
connected, at least during his first year in the Law School, with a debating society, and bore his part in discussions which related to the utility of trial by jury and of capital punishment, and the value of lyceums. He was not fluent in speech, but he prepared himself with care, as his minutes still preserved show. One attraction at this time proved stronger with Sumner than even his books. Miss Frances A. Kemble, the daughter of Charles Kemble, the English actor, and the niece of Mrs. Siddons, came with her father to this country in 1832, three years after her debut at Covent Garden in the character of Juliet. She was then but twenty-one years old; and her youth added to the fascination of her brilliant talents. Wherever she played, her acting was greatly admired; and by no class so much as by students. After fulfilling engagements in New York and other cities, she made her first appearance in Boston in April, 1833. Sumner was an enthusiast in his devotion, walking again a
Jonathan F. Stearns (search for this): chapter 6
lder your mind by taking too wide a range. Stearns, in a similar tone, wrote, Sept. 19, 1831, Yoyou credit. Browne wrote from Cambridge to Stearns, May 6, 1832:— We, in Cambridge here, alegal brethren by the head and shoulders. Stearns wrote to Sumner, May 14:— Browne tells . Letters to classmates. To Jonathan F. Stearns, Bedford, Mass. Sunday, Sept. 25, 1831. Div. 10. To Cambridge, Stearns, not knowing where Sumner was, wrote, Sept. 18, Where art thly looking to him for support and education. Stearns is somewhat recovered. He is with his fatherelieve me your true friend, C. S. To Jonathan F. Stearns. 34 Divinity Hall, Friday Evening, 10 From your true friend, C. S. to Jonathan F. Stearns, Andover, Mass. This letter is a reply to one from Stearns, then a student at the Andover Theological Seminary, in which he pressed they to be here on that day. Unless Hopkinson or Stearns or you perform the master's part, I doubt whe[1 more...]<
W. W. Story (search for this): chapter 6
courage then that ever after characterized him. Mr. Story contributed an In Memoriam tribute to Sumner, in f the office on my return from sweet Auburn, where Judge Story had been, in Nature's temple, set around with heron of the Mt. Auburn Cemetery, with extracts from Judge Story's address, is given in his Life and Letters, Vol.uture drive from the mind musings of the past. Judge Story is at Washington, with the Supreme Court, for thems, Dr. Bowditch, Edward Everett, Jeremiah Mason, Judge Story, Ticknor, leaders in the eloquence, statesmanshipging us into disgrace abroad and misery at home. Judge Story speaks much of its value; and so striking did itsre worth your coming from New York to study under Judge Story and Greenleaf next term. I shall not be here aftility, stand almost unrivalled. Judges Marshall and Story alone, of any judges in our country, may be comparedess correct, style than Kent's Commentaries, read Judge Story's Commentaries on the Constitution. They make an
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