hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 918 2 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 302 0 Browse Search
George S. Hillard 221 1 Browse Search
W. W. Story 176 0 Browse Search
William W. Story 154 0 Browse Search
France (France) 154 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 134 0 Browse Search
Simon Greenleaf 129 11 Browse Search
Francis Lieber 112 16 Browse Search
Jonathan French 98 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 526 total hits in 210 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
January 12th, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
our candid temper, and the terms on which we have been long conversant with each other, encourage the belief that you will suffer me for once to address you with great plainness. The sentiments of friendship I have so long cherished towards you; the high respect I entertain for your character and talents; the extensive influence which I foresee you are to have in the community; and, more than these, the immortality to which we both are destined,—all forbid me to be silent. Cambridge, Jan. 12, 1833. my dear friend,—I have received and am grateful for your letter. The interest you manifest in my welfare calls for my warmest acknowledgments. I do not know how I can better show myself worthy of your kindness than with all frankness and plainness to expose to you, in a few words, the state of my mind on the important subject upon which you addressed me. The last time I saw you, you urged upon me the study of the proofs of Christianity, with an earnestness that flowed, I was co
February, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
nd advised greater moderation in his studies. There was reason in their caution. It is possible to task the receptive capacity of the mind to the injury of its creative power; and Sumner, perhaps, gathered his knowledge too fast for the best intellectual discipline. His notes of the moot-court cases heard by the professors, in several of which he was counsel, Cases heard Oct. 22, Nov. 22, and Dec. 13, 1832; and Jan. 14, Feb. 18, June 5, July 5, and Oct. 20, 1833. are preserved. In Feb., 1833, he maintained (Wendell Phillips being of counsel on the other side) the negative of the question, whether a Scotch bond, assignable by the law of Scotland, can be sued by the assignee in his own name in our courts. He seems to have been dissatisfied with his argument, and wrote to Browne, stating his hesitation in public speaking, and his difficulty in selecting fit language for his thoughts. Browne replied, saying that he had overstated the difficulty, which was not peculiar to him; an
February 6th, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
. It will, I think, be very profitable to you, and not in the slightest degree affect your means of practical knowledge. Let nothing induce you to quit the law. You will, as sure as you live, possess a high rank in it, and need not fear the frowns of fortune or of power. While Judge Story was absent at Washington, Sumner was his correspondent at Cambridge, and served him in forwarding books, distributing presentation copies of his works, and in similar good offices. The judge wrote, Feb. 6, 1833, Story's Life and Letters, Vol. II. pp. 119, 120. There are not many of whom I would venture to ask the favor of troubling themselves in my affairs; but I feel proud to think that you are among the number, and I have, in some sort, as the Scotch would say, a heritable right to your friendship. And again, on Feb. 4, 1834: You must begin to be chary of your intellectual as well as physical strength, or it may be exhausted before you reach the fair maturity of life. During the summer
March, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
nothing is so like yourself as to stay to please your friend [Judge Story],— and such a friend! I most earnestly congratulate you on having gained the confidence, esteem, and friendship of that truly great man. It will fix your life's direction, and I would not have you forego the advantages which that situation and that intercourse will secure to you for my pleasure or gratification. You will find your employment probably in the science of the law, and will escape its drudgery. In March, 1833, a temperance society was formed in the college, which included members of the professional schools, as well as undergraduates. It was a period of special interest in this reform. The pledge of this society admitted the use of wines, excluding only that of spirituous liquors, and was binding only during the signer's connection with the college. The meeting for organization was held in a room in University Hall, which was used for commons. The first meeting was held March 6, and the
March 12th, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
g practitioners, and be in fact a counsellor during my attorneyship: but I could take an immediate practice and profit. Your chance at Cambridge, had I your fitness for the place, would tempt me more than a tour to Washington, which has so kindled your imagination. . . . As to your despondency, or whatever other name you please to give it, take exercise!—exercise!—exercise!—and it will vanish like the morning dew. Henry W. Paine, having left the Law School, wrote from Winslow, Me., March 12, 1833:— There is not one among my friends in whom I feel a more lively interest, whose prosperity would more essentially contribute to my happiness. Be careful of your health, my friend, and the day is not distant when I shall have the proud satisfaction of saying that Sumner was once my classmate. Again, on May 25:— Since my last, you have been called to mourn the departure of poor Ashmun. Indeed, we all mourned the event; but you must have felt it more sensibly than the
March 16th, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
ich included members of the professional schools, as well as undergraduates. It was a period of special interest in this reform. The pledge of this society admitted the use of wines, excluding only that of spirituous liquors, and was binding only during the signer's connection with the college. The meeting for organization was held in a room in University Hall, which was used for commons. The first meeting was held March 6, and the officers were chosen March 14. Mercantile Journal, March 16, 1833. Sumner was chosen President; Abiel A. Livermore, of the Divinity School, Vice-President; and Samuel Osgood, of the Divinity School, Secretary. Among the members of the Executive Committee were Barzillai Frost, of the Divinity School, and Richard H. Dana, Jr., of the Sophomore Class. Public meetings were held in the City Hall, or one of the churches; at one of which Rev. John G. Palfrey delivered an impressive address, still well remembered for its effective reference to graduates of t
April, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
d to the fascination of her brilliant talents. Wherever she played, her acting was greatly admired; and by no class so much as by students. After fulfilling engagements in New York and other cities, she made her first appearance in Boston in April, 1833. Sumner was an enthusiast in his devotion, walking again and again to the city during her engagement at the Tremont Theatre, witnessing her acting with intense admiration, and delighting to talk of her with his friends. Browne wrote, Aprilght and was safely moored on the tower. Mr. Sumner walked home with me arm in arm. This latter clause is underlined, as I suppose it was a very remarkable attention; at least he had now no awe of the young lady. It was in the preceding April, 1833, that John Hooker Ashmun died,— the Royall Professor of Law,—and Sumner must have been present at Judge Story's eulogy on Mr. Ashmun. In my journal of that day I write: After the services closed and the men came forward to remove the body, a
April 1st, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
study by decided or supposed cases, and to comment upon and criticise the text-book, but also to examine most of the students quite closely upon the lesson of the day. The exercise was a recitation rather than a lecture,—a mode of instruction which becomes inconvenient when a professional school is largely attended. Professor Ashmun was the sole instructor when Judge Story was absent on judicial duty at Washington, or on his circuit. His service as teacher was cut short by his death, April 1, 1833. Sumner alone was with him when he died, his sole watcher for the night. Judge Story's funeral discourse on Professor Ashmun was printed in the American Jurist, July, 1833, Vol. X. pp. 40-52. An extract is copied in Story's Life and Letters, Vol. II. pp. 143-148. Sumner was the interesting friend referred to in the discourse. He afterwards collected the funds for a monument to his teacher, and revised his manuscripts for posthumous publication in the American Jurist. He was admitt
May 9th, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
ill you have a numerous and well-ordered army. . . . Be this a foretaste of many successes in laudable undertakings. Again, on July 30:— You never think of bodily health. Do you have the folly to spend this vacation in poring? For shame! Take a country tour,—a long pedestrian tour. It will be the best way to further your intellectual progress. Give that pallid face a little color, those lean limbs a little muscle, and the bow of your mind a greater elasticity. Again, on May 9, 1833, Hopkinson wrote from Lowell, where he was practising law as the partner of Mr. Luther Lawrence: Had I but your application, I might consider myself in a good way. Not, indeed, that I could grasp such honors as are within your reach; not that I could walk over the heads of all young practitioners, and be in fact a counsellor during my attorneyship: but I could take an immediate practice and profit. Your chance at Cambridge, had I your fitness for the place, would tempt me more tha
June 12th, 1833 AD (search for this): chapter 6
prehensive views they take of the law of which they treat, and the condensed shape into which the law on their several titles is thrown. Kent is one of the glories of your State, whether you look at him as a commentator or a judge. In the latter capacity, his opinions, for learning and ability, stand almost unrivalled. Judges Marshall and Story alone, of any judges in our country, may be compared with him. . . . Truly and faithfully your friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Wednesday, June 12, 1833. my dear Tower,—I send by your brother for your acceptance a couple numbers of Professor Willard's Review, of which you may have heard, containing slight articles of mine; which I flattered myself might be interesting to you, not from any merit of theirs, but on account of our friendship. The article on impeachments was the result of some study of the impeachments under our Constitution, and is the fullest historical survey of that subject that I know of. The article on Blacksto
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...