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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

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orks, Vol. I. pp. 133-148; The Jurist, Works, Vol. I. pp. 258-272. Sumner, during the early part of his course at the Law School, occupied room Number 10 Divinity Hall, the most retired of the college buildings, and took his meals in commons. Afterwards, he became librarian of the school, and, as one of the privileges of his office, occupied as a dormitory room Number 4 Dane Hall, from the time that building was opened for use in Oct., 1832. When Dane Hall was removed a few feet, in 1871, to its present site, its portico and columns were taken down and an enclosed brick porch substituted. The Law School then numbered forty students, It now numbers one hundred and eighty-seven. and was divided into three classes,—the Senior, Middle, and Junior. There were three terms a year, corresponding to the college terms; and the instruction was given, prior to the erection of Dane Hall, in College House, Number 1, nearly opposite to its present site. Of the law-students, Sumner
February 3rd, 1871 AD (search for this): chapter 6
rwards. Circumstances and accidents forced him forward to the van, and he became a leader terribly in earnest. He had the same high-mindedness, the same single aim at justice and truth, the same inflexible faith and courage then that ever after characterized him. Mr. Story contributed an In Memoriam tribute to Sumner, in forty-one verses, to Blackwood's Magazine,Zzz Sept., 1874, Vol. CXVI. pp. 342-346. In an address to the students—colored—of Howard University, Washington, D. C., Feb. 3, 1871, Sumner said:— These exercises carry me back to early life, when I was a student of the Law School of Harvard University as you have been students in the Law School of Howard University. I cannot think of those days without fondness. They were the happiest of my life. . . . There is happiness in the acquisition of knowledge, which surpasses all common joys. The student who feels that he is making daily progress, constantly learning something new,—who sees the shadows by which he w
April 9th, 1873 AD (search for this): chapter 6
he then made; and with his classmate Hopkinson, who joined the school in the autumn of that year. Among other friends in the Law School were Charles C. Converse and George Gibbs. Converse became a judge of the Supreme Court of the State of Ohio. He resided at Zanesville, and died in 1860. Gibbs was a nephew of Rev. Dr. William E. Channing. He was the author of the Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington and John Adams. He resided at Washington during our Civil War, and died April 9, 1873. He assisted Sumner in procuring and arranging the materials for his speech on the purchase of Alaska. His manuscripts, containing researches on the Indians of the Northwest, are deposited in the Smithsonian Institution. Sumner, in his Sketch of the Law School, referred to Gibbs's Judicial Chronicle, prepared when the latter was under the age of majority. American Jurist, Jan., 1835, Vol. XIII. p. 120. With each of these he discussed common studies and plans of life, in his room and
September, 1874 AD (search for this): chapter 6
in his bearing and looks. I do not think, in his early years, he had any great ambition. That developed itself afterwards. Circumstances and accidents forced him forward to the van, and he became a leader terribly in earnest. He had the same high-mindedness, the same single aim at justice and truth, the same inflexible faith and courage then that ever after characterized him. Mr. Story contributed an In Memoriam tribute to Sumner, in forty-one verses, to Blackwood's Magazine,Zzz Sept., 1874, Vol. CXVI. pp. 342-346. In an address to the students—colored—of Howard University, Washington, D. C., Feb. 3, 1871, Sumner said:— These exercises carry me back to early life, when I was a student of the Law School of Harvard University as you have been students in the Law School of Howard University. I cannot think of those days without fondness. They were the happiest of my life. . . . There is happiness in the acquisition of knowledge, which surpasses all common joys. The s<
John Adams (search for this): chapter 6
ho entered Sumner's class in the spring of 1832, and whose acquaintance he then made; and with his classmate Hopkinson, who joined the school in the autumn of that year. Among other friends in the Law School were Charles C. Converse and George Gibbs. Converse became a judge of the Supreme Court of the State of Ohio. He resided at Zanesville, and died in 1860. Gibbs was a nephew of Rev. Dr. William E. Channing. He was the author of the Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington and John Adams. He resided at Washington during our Civil War, and died April 9, 1873. He assisted Sumner in procuring and arranging the materials for his speech on the purchase of Alaska. His manuscripts, containing researches on the Indians of the Northwest, are deposited in the Smithsonian Institution. Sumner, in his Sketch of the Law School, referred to Gibbs's Judicial Chronicle, prepared when the latter was under the age of majority. American Jurist, Jan., 1835, Vol. XIII. p. 120. With each o
John Quincy Adams (search for this): chapter 6
s of the school. . . . Your affectionate friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Cambridge, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 1832 my dear friend,—... Yesterday, Dane Law College (situated just north of Rev. Mr. Newell's church), a beautiful Grecian temple, with four Ionic pillars in front,—the most architectural and the best-built edifice belonging to the college,—was dedicated to the law. Quincy delivered a most proper address of an hour, full of his strong sense and strong language. Webster, J. Q. Adams, Dr. Bowditch, Edward Everett, Jeremiah Mason, Judge Story, Ticknor, leaders in the eloquence, statesmanship, mathematics, scholarship, and law of our good land, were all present,—a glorious company. The Law School have requested a copy for the press. It will of a certainty be given. I shall send you the address when published. When you again visit Cambridge you will be astonished at the changes that have been wrought,—trees planted, common fenced, new buildings raised, and other
Middle Ages (search for this): chapter 6
the Agricola of Tacitus: Per intervalla ac spiramenta temporum. It was written in a fortnight, without interfering with his regular studies, and covered fifty pages. Some of its quotations may be traced in his orations. The early part is elaborate, but the latter hurriedly written. Much space is taken with a review of the condition of Europe in the Dark Ages, and of the agencies which promoted modern civilization,—a line of thought probably suggested by his recent reading of Hallam's Middle Ages. This progressive development, he maintained, shows that the improvement of society is effected by gradual reforms, often unobserved, rather than by revolutions. The former are always to be encouraged; the latter become necessary when society has outgrown its institutions, and peaceful changes are resisted by the governing power. The dissertation bears the marks of haste in composition, and is marred by digressions and wanting in compactness. President Quincy wrote him a note, reque
s,—sesquipedalia verba (to which you know you are addicted),—and uncommon, brilliant, and Gibbonic phrases. You do not stumble, he said; you utter rapidly enough. To be sure, you have not the torrens dicendi, and that is a very fortunate thing. Sumner competed successfully for a Bowdoin prize offered to resident graduates for the best dissertation on the theme, Are the most important Changes in Society effected Gradually or by Violent Revolutions? His manuscript bore a motto from the Agricola of Tacitus: Per intervalla ac spiramenta temporum. It was written in a fortnight, without interfering with his regular studies, and covered fifty pages. Some of its quotations may be traced in his orations. The early part is elaborate, but the latter hurriedly written. Much space is taken with a review of the condition of Europe in the Dark Ages, and of the agencies which promoted modern civilization,—a line of thought probably suggested by his recent reading of Hallam's Middle Ages. T<
James C. Alvord (search for this): chapter 6
3-1848. the author of the treatise on The Law of Evidence; the vacancy being filled during the intervening period by James C. Alvord, of Greenfield, a young lawyer of marked ability. Both saw in Sumner a student of large promise, and became at oncen irresistible impulse, pressed forward and surrounded him for the last time. They were to see his face no more. Mr. Alvord took Mr. Ashmun's place as professor, but, in the summer of 1833, he also was taken very ill. During the weeks after the notice of the steeple-raising, I find Mr. Sumner's name mentioned constantly, coming in to report Mr. Alvord's state, as he visited him daily. One extract more from the journal: Charles Sumner came to give his account of Mr. Alvord, which is more Mr. Alvord, which is more favorable. He paid me a long visit, and we talked at the rate of nine knots an hour. He gave a curious account of a young man who has been studying Latin and Greek in a lighthouse, to prepare for college. The reason of his choosing a lighthouse is
John H. Ashmun (search for this): chapter 6
r is described in his Life and Letters, edited by his son, Vol. II. pp. 35-39. Ashmun was remarkable for his acumen and logical method; and the two professors were wch becomes inconvenient when a professional school is largely attended. Professor Ashmun was the sole instructor when Judge Story was absent on judicial duty at Waied, his sole watcher for the night. Judge Story's funeral discourse on Professor Ashmun was printed in the American Jurist, July, 1833, Vol. X. pp. 40-52. An extnce, and received peculiar help from his severe method of legal investigation. Ashmun insisted always on definiteness of thought and exactness of expression, and wasone of Sumner's tastes and habits of study, and he profited much by it. Professor Ashmun was succeeded, in July, by Simon Greenleaf, 1783-1853; practised law iny 25:— Since my last, you have been called to mourn the departure of poor Ashmun. Indeed, we all mourned the event; but you must have felt it more sensibly tha
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