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ble, man in his bearing and looks. I do not think, in his early years, he had any great ambition. That developed itself afterwards. Circumstances and accidents forced him forward to the van, and he became a leader terribly in earnest. He had the same high-mindedness, the same single aim at justice and truth, the same inflexible faith and courage then that ever after characterized him. Mr. Story contributed an In Memoriam tribute to Sumner, in forty-one verses, to Blackwood's Magazine,Zzz Sept., 1874, Vol. CXVI. pp. 342-346. In an address to the students—colored—of Howard University, Washington, D. C., Feb. 3, 1871, Sumner said:— These exercises carry me back to early life, when I was a student of the Law School of Harvard University as you have been students in the Law School of Howard University. I cannot think of those days without fondness. They were the happiest of my life. . . . There is happiness in the acquisition of knowledge, which surpasses all common joys<
their several titles is thrown. Kent is one of the glories of your State, whether you look at him as a commentator or a judge. In the latter capacity, his opinions, for learning and ability, stand almost unrivalled. Judges Marshall and Story alone, of any judges in our country, may be compared with him. . . . Truly and faithfully your friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Wednesday, June 12, 1833. my dear Tower,—I send by your brother for your acceptance a couple numbers of Professor Willard's Review, of which you may have heard, containing slight articles of mine; which I flattered myself might be interesting to you, not from any merit of theirs, but on account of our friendship. The article on impeachments was the result of some study of the impeachments under our Constitution, and is the fullest historical survey of that subject that I know of. The article on Blackstone is a meagre thing, written at five minutes notice, to piece out the number for the month. The two n
Fletcher Webster (search for this): chapter 6
uilt edifice belonging to the college,—was dedicated to the law. Quincy delivered a most proper address of an hour, full of his strong sense and strong language. Webster, J. Q. Adams, Dr. Bowditch, Edward Everett, Jeremiah Mason, Judge Story, Ticknor, leaders in the eloquence, statesmanship, mathematics, scholarship, and law of ouiews raised at all above the ephemeral politics with which we are annoyed. Wednesday eve. Since I wrote the above, two whole days have passed. I have heard Webster's performance The class oration of Fletcher Webster, son of Daniel Webster, at the exhibition is referred to. and like it much. He did himself honor with matuFletcher Webster, son of Daniel Webster, at the exhibition is referred to. and like it much. He did himself honor with mature men. As for undergraduates, I suppose they were dissatisfied, for they could find no brilliancies or points or attractive allusions. It was characterized by judgment, sense, and great directness and plainness of speech. It had no exaggerated thoughts or expressions, but was full of simple thoughts expressed in the simplest la
Waterston (search for this): chapter 6
entered sympathetically into the household life of his friends, he was, at this period,—which is marked by an absorbing, almost ascetic, devotion to the pursuit of knowledge,—indifferent to the society of ladies whose charms were chiefly those of person and youth; and his preference for the conversation of scholarly persons gave at times much amusement to others; but, as some lifelong friendships attest, no one was ever more appreciative of women of superior refinement and excellence. Mrs. Waterston, a daughter of President Quincy, writes:— Charles Sumner entered his Senior year in 1830. The son of an old friend of my father's, he must have had an early invitation to our house. The first distinct remembrance I have of him personally was on one of my mother's reception evenings, held every Thursday during the winter, and open to all acquaintances and the students. I was standing at the end of one of the long, old-fashioned rooms, and saw, among a crowd of half-grown youths <
Bushrod Washington (search for this): chapter 6
ot to him alone. The honor and garland are his; but the benefit goes down to the latest posterity. The toil and danger are his; but, in Milton's words again, he shall have his charter and freehold of rejoicing to him and his heirs. It was Sumner's purpose to leave the Law School in July, 1833, at the end of a two years course; but he yielded to the persuasions of Judge Story, who urged him to remain during the next term, which would close with the year. The judge wrote to him from Washington, July 12: I am very glad that you have concluded to remain at the Law School another term. It will, I think, be very profitable to you, and not in the slightest degree affect your means of practical knowledge. Let nothing induce you to quit the law. You will, as sure as you live, possess a high rank in it, and need not fear the frowns of fortune or of power. While Judge Story was absent at Washington, Sumner was his correspondent at Cambridge, and served him in forwarding books, distr
Emory Washburn (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. Sumner joined the Law School of Harvard University, Sept. 1, 1831. Sumner was the author of two sketches of the Law School,—one, an article in the American Jurist, Jan., 1835. Vol. XIII. pp. 107-130; and the other, A Report of the Committee of Overseers, Feb., 1850. Works, Vol. II. pp. 377-392. Another history of the school, by Professor Emory Washburn, may be found in The Harvard Book, Vol. I. pp. 223-231. This school grew out of the Royall Professorship of Law, which was established in 1815. It was organized as a distinct department two years later; but its vigorous life began in 1829, with the appointment of Judge Story and John H. Ashmun as professors. The character of Story as jurist and teacher, his immense learning, copious speech, great enthusiasm, and kindly interest in students have been often commemorated. Judge Story's method as a teacher is described in his Life and Letters, edited by <
Henry Ware (search for this): chapter 6
o me? said I. Oh, I did not dare to be; I only looked at you from afar with awe. I was, in fact, a year younger than himself; but in those simple days the chasm was wide between a raw collegian, as he then was, and a young lady in society. I recall him very distinctly in his seat on Sundays. It was in the old chapel in University Hall, before any alteration had been made. The President's pew was in the gallery, on the right of the pulpit. Perched there, I looked down, first on good Dr. Ware, Sr., in his professor's gown; and, while he discoursed furthermore, I looked beyond and below on the very young Sophomores, and saw Sumner's long proportions in the front seat of the Seniors. It was during his residence as a law-student that he was most frequently at our house. I do not think he ever sought ladies' society much, though I remember we always enjoyed his conversation, and that my mother foresaw a future for Charles Sumner. It was during his law-studies that Judge Story a
Charlemagne Tower (search for this): chapter 6
199. Your true friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Law School, Divinity friend in truth, Charles Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower. Cambridge, Law School, Jan. 31, 1832. cipated the sorrowful intelligence it bore. Tower's father had died, March 15, at St. Augustine.d piety. You kindly mentioned my sister. Tower, Hopkinson, Stearns, and Converse wrote to Summ your true friend, Chas. Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower. Boston, Sunday, July 29, 1832. my d Your affectionate friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Cambridge, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 1832 our sincere friend, Chas. Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower. Cambridge, Dec. 17, 1832. my dear TTower,—A letter from you is now something of an event in my meagre life. Last year and the year befe Tower. Wednesday, June 12, 1833. my dear Tower,—I send by your brother for your acceptance a eve me your faithful friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Dane Law College, Monday, July 15, 183[7 more...]<
George Ticknor (search for this): chapter 6
emagne Tower. Cambridge, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 1832 my dear friend,—... Yesterday, Dane Law College (situated just north of Rev. Mr. Newell's church), a beautiful Grecian temple, with four Ionic pillars in front,—the most architectural and the best-built edifice belonging to the college,—was dedicated to the law. Quincy delivered a most proper address of an hour, full of his strong sense and strong language. Webster, J. Q. Adams, Dr. Bowditch, Edward Everett, Jeremiah Mason, Judge Story, Ticknor, leaders in the eloquence, statesmanship, mathematics, scholarship, and law of our good land, were all present,—a glorious company. The Law School have requested a copy for the press. It will of a certainty be given. I shall send you the address when published. When you again visit Cambridge you will be astonished at the changes that have been wrought,—trees planted, common fenced, new buildings raised, and others designed. Quincy is a man of life, and infuses a vigor into all tha
Waterville, N.Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
se reading. Le changement d'occupation est mon seul dZZZlassement, says Chancellor D'Aguesseau, one of the greatest lawyers France ever saw. And now have I blackened enough paper? Have you read to this spot? If you have, you are a well-doing servant, and shalt surely have your reward. But pray visit upon these sheets the heretic's fate,—fire, fire, fire. And now I stop. Dabit deus his quoque finem. Virgil, Aeneid I. 199. Your true friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Law School, Divinity Hall, No. 10, Sept. 29, 1831. A new curtain has arisen. I am treading another scene of life. I behold new objects of study, and am presented with new sources of reflection. I have left Boston and the profitless thoughts which its streets, its inhabitants, its politics, and its newspapers ever excite. I find myself again in loved Cambridge, where are sociability and retirement, and where those frittering cares and thoughts which every city inflicts upon its
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