hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 918 2 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 302 0 Browse Search
George S. Hillard 221 1 Browse Search
W. W. Story 176 0 Browse Search
William W. Story 154 0 Browse Search
France (France) 154 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 134 0 Browse Search
Simon Greenleaf 129 11 Browse Search
Francis Lieber 112 16 Browse Search
Jonathan French 98 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 526 total hits in 210 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Franklin Mills, Portage County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
to the common law. Jones's work was written about forty years ago. Since then it has gained a much completer conformation. Story's work will supply all deficiencies, and, I suspect, be an interesting book; certainly a useful one. I am now upon Kent's second volume. He is certainly the star of your State. I like his works, though less than most students. To me he is very indistinct in his outlines. This, perhaps, is the more observable, stepping, as I do, from the well-defined page of Bl . . . If you want a book which will be a light law-book, and a most instructive work as to the government under which we live, which shall be entertaining and informing, written in a more brilliant and elementary, though less correct, style than Kent's Commentaries, read Judge Story's Commentaries on the Constitution. They make an invaluable work to every statesman and lawyer; in fact, to every citizen of views raised at all above the ephemeral politics with which we are annoyed. Wednesday
Berkshire County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
tion, and delighting to talk of her with his friends. Browne wrote, April 18, You speak rapturously of the girl. Judge Story's enthusiasm for Miss Kemble quite equalled Sumner's. He was charmed with her acting, and addressed some verses to her:— Go! lovely woman, go! Enjoy thy fame! A second Kemble, with a deathless name. Life and Letters, Vol. II. pp. 114-117. He did not know her personally at this time, but greatly enjoyed her society some years afterwards, during a visit to Berkshire County. Sumner visited, while a student in the Law School, but few families. He was a welcome guest at the firesides of the two professors, and Mrs. Story and Mrs. Greenleaf took an interest in him almost equal to that of their husbands. His friendship with the family of President Quincy, which began at this period, remained unbroken through life; and from them, in all the vicissitudes of his career, he never failed to receive hearty sympathy and support. While he entered sympathetically
Lincoln's inn (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
physical strength, or it may be exhausted before you reach the fair maturity of life. During the summer and autumn of 1833, while serving as librarian, Sumner prepared a catalogue of the library of the Law School. His work, for which he was voted one hundred and fifty dollars by the corporation, was carefully done and much approved at the time. It contains, besides the list of books, an interesting sketch of the growth of the library, and of the gifts of the second Thomas Hollis, of Lincoln's Inn, which was republished in the American Jurist. Jan., 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 263-268. In 1833, he contributed two articles to the American Monthly Review: April and May. one, a review of the impeachment trials before the Senate of the United States, and particularly that of Judge Peck; and the other, a notice of an edition of Blackstone's Commentaries, with special reference to the notes of Christian and Chitty. Browne wrote to him in relation to the former article:— It is
Alaska (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
g other friends in the Law School were Charles C. Converse and George Gibbs. Converse became a judge of the Supreme Court of the State of Ohio. He resided at Zanesville, and died in 1860. Gibbs was a nephew of Rev. Dr. William E. Channing. He was the author of the Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington and John Adams. He resided at Washington during our Civil War, and died April 9, 1873. He assisted Sumner in procuring and arranging the materials for his speech on the purchase of Alaska. His manuscripts, containing researches on the Indians of the Northwest, are deposited in the Smithsonian Institution. Sumner, in his Sketch of the Law School, referred to Gibbs's Judicial Chronicle, prepared when the latter was under the age of majority. American Jurist, Jan., 1835, Vol. XIII. p. 120. With each of these he discussed common studies and plans of life, in his room and in occasional walks. Sumner and Phillips had been fellow-students, though in different classes, at the La
France (France) (search for this): chapter 6
ience of others; but let him not put aside his own judgment. Well, six hours,—namely, the forenoon wholly and solely to law; afternoon to classics; evening to history, subjects collateral and assistant to law, &c. I have as yet read little else than law since I have been here; but the above is the plan I have chalked out. Recreation must not be found in idleness or loose reading. Le changement d'occupation est mon seul dZZZlassement, says Chancellor D'Aguesseau, one of the greatest lawyers France ever saw. And now have I blackened enough paper? Have you read to this spot? If you have, you are a well-doing servant, and shalt surely have your reward. But pray visit upon these sheets the heretic's fate,—fire, fire, fire. And now I stop. Dabit deus his quoque finem. Virgil, Aeneid I. 199. Your true friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Law School, Divinity Hall, No. 10, Sept. 29, 1831. A new curtain has arisen. I am treading another scene of life.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
n their society. I sit oftentimes, after having read one of your letters, filled with that mingled melancholy and joy which comes over one when thinking of the enjoyments of the past, and of the too palpable certainty that those enjoyments will never again be met except by Memory in her pleasant wanderings. But stop!— We truly are in a sad state. Civil war, in a portentous cloud, hangs over us. South Carolina, though the sorest part of our system, is not the only part that is galled. Georgia cannot, Virginia cannot, stomach the high Federal doctrines which the President has set forth in his proclamation, Andrew Jackson's Proclamation of Dec., 1832, upon the occasion of the nullifying ordinance of South Carolina. and upon which the stability of the country rests. That is a glorious document, worthy of any President. Our part of the country rejoices in it as a true exposition of the Constitution, and a fervid address to those wayward men who are now plunging us into disgrace
Waterville, N.Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
se reading. Le changement d'occupation est mon seul dZZZlassement, says Chancellor D'Aguesseau, one of the greatest lawyers France ever saw. And now have I blackened enough paper? Have you read to this spot? If you have, you are a well-doing servant, and shalt surely have your reward. But pray visit upon these sheets the heretic's fate,—fire, fire, fire. And now I stop. Dabit deus his quoque finem. Virgil, Aeneid I. 199. Your true friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Law School, Divinity Hall, No. 10, Sept. 29, 1831. A new curtain has arisen. I am treading another scene of life. I behold new objects of study, and am presented with new sources of reflection. I have left Boston and the profitless thoughts which its streets, its inhabitants, its politics, and its newspapers ever excite. I find myself again in loved Cambridge, where are sociability and retirement, and where those frittering cares and thoughts which every city inflicts upon its
Blackstone (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
me. It contains, besides the list of books, an interesting sketch of the growth of the library, and of the gifts of the second Thomas Hollis, of Lincoln's Inn, which was republished in the American Jurist. Jan., 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 263-268. In 1833, he contributed two articles to the American Monthly Review: April and May. one, a review of the impeachment trials before the Senate of the United States, and particularly that of Judge Peck; and the other, a notice of an edition of Blackstone's Commentaries, with special reference to the notes of Christian and Chitty. Browne wrote to him in relation to the former article:— It is learned without a show of learning. To have been able to accomplish such a matter is no small subject of rejoicing. I am glad to see you grow. You have improved your style in proportions and muscle. It bears in that article a favorable comparison with a strong, healthy, well-built man. Did you get that Latin quotation from Persius? That was
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
enjoyments of the past, and of the too palpable certainty that those enjoyments will never again be met except by Memory in her pleasant wanderings. But stop!— We truly are in a sad state. Civil war, in a portentous cloud, hangs over us. South Carolina, though the sorest part of our system, is not the only part that is galled. Georgia cannot, Virginia cannot, stomach the high Federal doctrines which the President has set forth in his proclamation, Andrew Jackson's Proclamation of Dec., 1832, upon the occasion of the nullifying ordinance of South Carolina. and upon which the stability of the country rests. That is a glorious document, worthy of any President. Our part of the country rejoices in it as a true exposition of the Constitution, and a fervid address to those wayward men who are now plunging us into disgrace abroad and misery at home. Judge Story speaks much of its value; and so striking did its argument appear to him, that he has introduced it into a note to his wo
Thomas Hollis (search for this): chapter 6
ectual as well as physical strength, or it may be exhausted before you reach the fair maturity of life. During the summer and autumn of 1833, while serving as librarian, Sumner prepared a catalogue of the library of the Law School. His work, for which he was voted one hundred and fifty dollars by the corporation, was carefully done and much approved at the time. It contains, besides the list of books, an interesting sketch of the growth of the library, and of the gifts of the second Thomas Hollis, of Lincoln's Inn, which was republished in the American Jurist. Jan., 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 263-268. In 1833, he contributed two articles to the American Monthly Review: April and May. one, a review of the impeachment trials before the Senate of the United States, and particularly that of Judge Peck; and the other, a notice of an edition of Blackstone's Commentaries, with special reference to the notes of Christian and Chitty. Browne wrote to him in relation to the former art
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...