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Edward Everett (search for this): chapter 6
a most proper address of an hour, full of his strong sense and strong language. Webster, J. Q. Adams, Dr. Bowditch, Edward Everett, Jeremiah Mason, Judge Story, Ticknor, leaders in the eloquence, statesmanship, mathematics, scholarship, and law of ed and talked the same as when we met one another every day in social and intellectual communion .... Need I say that Everett did wonders on Phi Beta day? Mr. Everett repeated on this occasion, Aug. 29, the oration on the Education of Mankind,Mr. Everett repeated on this occasion, Aug. 29, the oration on the Education of Mankind, which he had delivered, Aug. 20, at Yale College. Orations and Speeches by Edward Everett, Vol. I. pp. 404-441. Popkin has resigned. Felton will probably be his successor. Thank you for reading my article in the Jurist; but I want you to make alEdward Everett, Vol. I. pp. 404-441. Popkin has resigned. Felton will probably be his successor. Thank you for reading my article in the Jurist; but I want you to make allowances for the haste in which it was composed, and more for the inaccuracy with which it is printed. Your faithful friend, C. S.
John B. Kerr (search for this): chapter 6
cularly to be here on that day. Unless Hopkinson or Stearns or you perform the master's part, I doubt whether I shall take the trouble to attend the fatiguing exercises, or take myself from my every-day duties. Faithfully yours, C. S. To John B. Kerr, Easton, Md. Dane Law College, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 1833. my dear Kerr,—I am thankful to you for the gratification afforded simply by the sight of that handwriting, of which I was wont to see so much when in the further entry of Holworthy, Kerr,—I am thankful to you for the gratification afforded simply by the sight of that handwriting, of which I was wont to see so much when in the further entry of Holworthy, as it lay scattered over your tables loaded with books, or was thrown into the yard with forgotten things, in the shape of embryo theses or letters or parts. It was last evening that I took from the post-office your friendly favor; and I at once recognized the familiar strokes, as if my eyes had rested upon them but yesterday. . . . You inquire of many of our class; where they are, and what their present prospects, &c. I can answer some such questions; for, being of Cambridge, I am naturally
their several titles is thrown. Kent is one of the glories of your State, whether you look at him as a commentator or a judge. In the latter capacity, his opinions, for learning and ability, stand almost unrivalled. Judges Marshall and Story alone, of any judges in our country, may be compared with him. . . . Truly and faithfully your friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Wednesday, June 12, 1833. my dear Tower,—I send by your brother for your acceptance a couple numbers of Professor Willard's Review, of which you may have heard, containing slight articles of mine; which I flattered myself might be interesting to you, not from any merit of theirs, but on account of our friendship. The article on impeachments was the result of some study of the impeachments under our Constitution, and is the fullest historical survey of that subject that I know of. The article on Blackstone is a meagre thing, written at five minutes notice, to piece out the number for the month. The two n
William W. Story (search for this): chapter 6
n students have been often commemorated. Judge Story's method as a teacher is described in his Lofessor Ashmun was the sole instructor when Judge Story was absent on judicial duty at Washington, with the school as pupil or instructor. Judge Story was at first attracted to Sumner by a long-one dwelt much in his thoughts. Fascinated by Story's learning and fame, he looked probably to theen law and equity, then much misconceived. Judge Story noted it, in his Equity Jurisprudence, as aril 18, You speak rapturously of the girl. Judge Story's enthusiasm for Miss Kemble quite equalledSumner. It was during his law-studies that Judge Story and my father recognized his uncommon abilis joined us, and we sat on the portico; for Judge Story, fearing some accident would occur, would nster could not wait for it; but I staid with Mrs. Story until it rose to its full height and was safs time certainly, Gray was his favorite; W. W. Story gave Sumner, Jan. 1, 1834, a copy of Milton[14 more...]
Mansfield (search for this): chapter 6
ct transition in Sumner's early life. To the classmates who were nearest to him in sympathy he frankly confessed his ambition. It had, while in college and the year after, been stirred by the great names of history; but, until he decided to study at the Law School, it was vague and unsettled. Having chosen his profession, the jurist became his ideal. He aspired to know the law as a science, and not merely to follow it as a lucrative occupation. Such names as those of Grotius, Pothier, Mansfield, and Blackstone dwelt much in his thoughts. Fascinated by Story's learning and fame, he looked probably to the bench or the professor's chair as the highest reward of his unwearied toils. In his oration on The Scholar, the Jurist, the Artist, the Philanthropist, he draws, with illustrations, the distinction between the jurist and the lawyer. Works, Vol I. pp. 263-268. He entered on his chosen study with the greatest ardor and enthusiasm. To a classmate he wrote of the law as a no
William E. Channing (search for this): chapter 6
lowell, Me., and removed, in 1854, to Boston, where he is still one of the leaders of the bar. who entered Sumner's class in the spring of 1832, and whose acquaintance he then made; and with his classmate Hopkinson, who joined the school in the autumn of that year. Among other friends in the Law School were Charles C. Converse and George Gibbs. Converse became a judge of the Supreme Court of the State of Ohio. He resided at Zanesville, and died in 1860. Gibbs was a nephew of Rev. Dr. William E. Channing. He was the author of the Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington and John Adams. He resided at Washington during our Civil War, and died April 9, 1873. He assisted Sumner in procuring and arranging the materials for his speech on the purchase of Alaska. His manuscripts, containing researches on the Indians of the Northwest, are deposited in the Smithsonian Institution. Sumner, in his Sketch of the Law School, referred to Gibbs's Judicial Chronicle, prepared when the lat
Samuel M. Emery (search for this): chapter 6
ive his account of Mr. Alvord, which is more favorable. He paid me a long visit, and we talked at the rate of nine knots an hour. He gave a curious account of a young man who has been studying Latin and Greek in a lighthouse, to prepare for college. The reason of his choosing a lighthouse is to save the expense of oil! We agreed that he deserved all success. Mamma returned from Dedham while Mr. Sumner was still here, and he staid and had a good long talk with her. His classmate, Rev. Dr. Emery, writes:— In Oct., 1833, I returned to Cambridge and became a resident graduate. I found Sumner in the Law School, pursuing his studies with great enthusiasm, and we were often in each other's rooms. He was the same scholarly person then as when in college, and he lived, as it were, in intimate converse with the learned of ancient and modern times. I have no doubt his mind was better stored with accurate and critical knowledge than that of any other student in the school. He oc
Emory Washburn (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. Sumner joined the Law School of Harvard University, Sept. 1, 1831. Sumner was the author of two sketches of the Law School,—one, an article in the American Jurist, Jan., 1835. Vol. XIII. pp. 107-130; and the other, A Report of the Committee of Overseers, Feb., 1850. Works, Vol. II. pp. 377-392. Another history of the school, by Professor Emory Washburn, may be found in The Harvard Book, Vol. I. pp. 223-231. This school grew out of the Royall Professorship of Law, which was established in 1815. It was organized as a distinct department two years later; but its vigorous life began in 1829, with the appointment of Judge Story and John H. Ashmun as professors. The character of Story as jurist and teacher, his immense learning, copious speech, great enthusiasm, and kindly interest in students have been often commemorated. Judge Story's method as a teacher is described in his Life and Letters, edited by <
Benjamin R. Curtis (search for this): chapter 6
r respect and gives earnest of future usefulness. The world is apt to judge of a day's performances by the few brilliant and striking parts that are heard. This is not the proper test. There was a general rising against the Master's degree. Curtis, Benjamin R. Curtis. by far the first man of his class, with the highest legal prospects before him, refused it, and stirred many of his class to the same conclusion.... From your sincere friend, Chas. Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower. CamBenjamin R. Curtis. by far the first man of his class, with the highest legal prospects before him, refused it, and stirred many of his class to the same conclusion.... From your sincere friend, Chas. Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower. Cambridge, Dec. 17, 1832. my dear Tower,—A letter from you is now something of an event in my meagre life. Last year and the year before I had several correspondents, who occasionally favored me with their letters. But they have all shrunk away but yourself. Professional studies, and those cares which thicken upon us all as we gain in years, gradually weaned them from the pleasures of friendship, binding them to those labors which may secure them bread and fame. With you I have now held a lo
h of the library, and of the gifts of the second Thomas Hollis, of Lincoln's Inn, which was republished in the American Jurist. Jan., 1834, Vol. XII. pp. 263-268. In 1833, he contributed two articles to the American Monthly Review: April and May. one, a review of the impeachment trials before the Senate of the United States, and particularly that of Judge Peck; and the other, a notice of an edition of Blackstone's Commentaries, with special reference to the notes of Christian and Chitty. Browne wrote to him in relation to the former article:— It is learned without a show of learning. To have been able to accomplish such a matter is no small subject of rejoicing. I am glad to see you grow. You have improved your style in proportions and muscle. It bears in that article a favorable comparison with a strong, healthy, well-built man. Did you get that Latin quotation from Persius? That was the only thing I would ask to strike out. It was far-fetched, knotty, and hard
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