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Edmund Burke (search for this): chapter 6
n. If it is so, yet knowledge and acquirements are relative; and the man who knows that he knows nothing is yet more wise than the herd of his fellow-men,—even as much more wise, as wisdom itself is wiser than he is. And here is the place for hope,—though we cannot mount to the skies or elevate ourself from mother earth, yet can we reach far above those around us, and look with a far keener gaze. What man has done, man can do; and in these words is a full fountain of hope. And again, hear Burke: There is nothing in the world really beneficial that does not lie within the reach of an informed understanding and a well-directed pursuit. There is nothing that God has judged good for us that He has not given us the means to accomplish, both in the natural and the moral world. Speech on the Plan for Economical Reform. What a sentiment! how rich in expression, how richer in truth! A lawyer must know every thing. He must know law, history, philosophy, human nature; and, if he cove
John Adams (search for this): chapter 6
ho entered Sumner's class in the spring of 1832, and whose acquaintance he then made; and with his classmate Hopkinson, who joined the school in the autumn of that year. Among other friends in the Law School were Charles C. Converse and George Gibbs. Converse became a judge of the Supreme Court of the State of Ohio. He resided at Zanesville, and died in 1860. Gibbs was a nephew of Rev. Dr. William E. Channing. He was the author of the Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington and John Adams. He resided at Washington during our Civil War, and died April 9, 1873. He assisted Sumner in procuring and arranging the materials for his speech on the purchase of Alaska. His manuscripts, containing researches on the Indians of the Northwest, are deposited in the Smithsonian Institution. Sumner, in his Sketch of the Law School, referred to Gibbs's Judicial Chronicle, prepared when the latter was under the age of majority. American Jurist, Jan., 1835, Vol. XIII. p. 120. With each o
William Johnson (search for this): chapter 6
erred to Gibbs's Judicial Chronicle, prepared when the latter was under the age of majority. American Jurist, Jan., 1835, Vol. XIII. p. 120. With each of these he discussed common studies and plans of life, in his room and in occasional walks. Sumner and Phillips had been fellow-students, though in different classes, at the Latin School and in college; but their familiar acquaintance dates from their connection with the Law School. Mr. Phillips is the author of the sketch of Sumner in Johnson's Encyclopaedia. Sumner had now attained the full height of his manhood,— six feet and two inches. He was tall and gaunt, weighing only one hundred and twenty pounds. His hair was dark-brown; his eyes hazel, and inflamed by excessive use; his face sharp-featured; his teeth gleaming with whiteness; his complexion dark and not clear; his visage and person not attractive to the eye, and far unlike his presence in later life, when with full proportions and classic features he arrested atten
hool marks a distinct transition in Sumner's early life. To the classmates who were nearest to him in sympathy he frankly confessed his ambition. It had, while in college and the year after, been stirred by the great names of history; but, until he decided to study at the Law School, it was vague and unsettled. Having chosen his profession, the jurist became his ideal. He aspired to know the law as a science, and not merely to follow it as a lucrative occupation. Such names as those of Grotius, Pothier, Mansfield, and Blackstone dwelt much in his thoughts. Fascinated by Story's learning and fame, he looked probably to the bench or the professor's chair as the highest reward of his unwearied toils. In his oration on The Scholar, the Jurist, the Artist, the Philanthropist, he draws, with illustrations, the distinction between the jurist and the lawyer. Works, Vol I. pp. 263-268. He entered on his chosen study with the greatest ardor and enthusiasm. To a classmate he wrote
Francis Bowen (search for this): chapter 6
ale College. is rather a celebrated one; has excited much comment; is thought to be one of the most thorough and searching reviews (strictly reviews, for it is not a talk round about and about its subject) that has ever appeared in our country. Preparations are making to receive General Jackson with the same college ceremonies with which Monroe was received,—namely, an address in English from the President, and a Latin address from the first scholar of the Senior Class,—Bowen. Professor Francis Bowen. Believe me your faithful friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Dane Law College, Monday, July 15, 1833. . . . If you want a book which will be a light law-book, and a most instructive work as to the government under which we live, which shall be entertaining and informing, written in a more brilliant and elementary, though less correct, style than Kent's Commentaries, read Judge Story's Commentaries on the Constitution. They make an invaluable work to every statesman and l
Matthew Hale (search for this): chapter 6
wrote out tables of English kings and lord-chancellors, with dates of reigns and terms; sketches of lawyers, drawn largely from Roscoe's Lives; extracts from Sir Matthew Hale's History of the Common Law; and the definitions and incidents of Estates, as laid down by Blackstone. The list of books read by him at the school, as not of study,—but I think of something like the following: The law in the forenoon; six hours to law is all that Coke asks for (sex horas des legibus aequis), and Matthew Hale and Sir William Jones and all who have declared an opinion; though, as to that matter, I should be influenced little more than a tittle by any opinions of othen, our classmate, died,—a calm and easy death, unconscious that he was sinking into a sleep longer than that of a night. Yesterday's paper told me of the death of Hale, from New York, who graduated the year after we did. What death may come next,—who can tell? . . . I have thought but little of the Bowdoin subjects, and it is <
Waterston (search for this): chapter 6
entered sympathetically into the household life of his friends, he was, at this period,—which is marked by an absorbing, almost ascetic, devotion to the pursuit of knowledge,—indifferent to the society of ladies whose charms were chiefly those of person and youth; and his preference for the conversation of scholarly persons gave at times much amusement to others; but, as some lifelong friendships attest, no one was ever more appreciative of women of superior refinement and excellence. Mrs. Waterston, a daughter of President Quincy, writes:— Charles Sumner entered his Senior year in 1830. The son of an old friend of my father's, he must have had an early invitation to our house. The first distinct remembrance I have of him personally was on one of my mother's reception evenings, held every Thursday during the winter, and open to all acquaintances and the students. I was standing at the end of one of the long, old-fashioned rooms, and saw, among a crowd of half-grown youths <
in. The whole Review smacks strongly of the place of its publication. The article on Professor Stuart's classics By Professor James L. Kingsley, of Yale College. is rather a celebrated one; has excited much comment; is thought to be one of the most thorough and searching reviews (strictly reviews, for it is not a talk round about and about its subject) that has ever appeared in our country. Preparations are making to receive General Jackson with the same college ceremonies with which Monroe was received,—namely, an address in English from the President, and a Latin address from the first scholar of the Senior Class,—Bowen. Professor Francis Bowen. Believe me your faithful friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Dane Law College, Monday, July 15, 1833. . . . If you want a book which will be a light law-book, and a most instructive work as to the government under which we live, which shall be entertaining and informing, written in a more brilliant and elementary, though
George Gibbs (search for this): chapter 6
made; and with his classmate Hopkinson, who joined the school in the autumn of that year. Among other friends in the Law School were Charles C. Converse and George Gibbs. Converse became a judge of the Supreme Court of the State of Ohio. He resided at Zanesville, and died in 1860. Gibbs was a nephew of Rev. Dr. William E. ChGibbs was a nephew of Rev. Dr. William E. Channing. He was the author of the Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington and John Adams. He resided at Washington during our Civil War, and died April 9, 1873. He assisted Sumner in procuring and arranging the materials for his speech on the purchase of Alaska. His manuscripts, containing researches on the Indians of the Northwest, are deposited in the Smithsonian Institution. Sumner, in his Sketch of the Law School, referred to Gibbs's Judicial Chronicle, prepared when the latter was under the age of majority. American Jurist, Jan., 1835, Vol. XIII. p. 120. With each of these he discussed common studies and plans of life, in his room and in occa
d speculation upon the proposed subject. I attended Bishop Hopkins's lectures, and gave to them a severe attention. I remained and still remain unconvinced that Christ was divinely commissioned to preach a revelation to men, and that he was entrusted with the power of working miracles. But when I make this declaration, I do not mean to deny that such a being as Christ lived and went about doing good, or that the body of precepts which have come down to us as delivered by him, were so delivered. I believe that Christ lived when and as the Gospel says; that he was more than man,—namely, above all men who had as yet lived,—and yet less than God; full of tChrist lived when and as the Gospel says; that he was more than man,—namely, above all men who had as yet lived,—and yet less than God; full of the strongest sense and knowledge, and of a virtue superior to any which we call Roman or Grecian or Stoic, and which we best denote when, borrowing his name, we call it Christian. I pray you not to believe that I am insensible to the goodness and greatness of his character. My idea of human nature is exalted, when I think that s
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