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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

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John W. Browne (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: going to Europe.—December, 1837.—Age, 26. From his boyhood Sumner had longed to visit Europe, and with his reading of history this desire grew into a passion. The want of the necessary funds compelled him to postpone its gratification until he had in part earned them, and won friends who would advance the rest. A circumstance gleaned from the letters of Browne and Hopkinson, which occurred during his last year in the Law School, is significant of his earnestness in this direction. He nearly completed, at that time, a negotiation by which a gentleman was to defray his expenses for a year's travelling abroad, in consideration of certain personal services to be rendered at home. Its details are not preserved; but the two classmates, who did not hear of the proposed arrangement until it had fallen through, upbraided him in a friendly way for proposing to assume an obligation which they thought would compromise his personal independence. This strong desire, increasing
Samuel Lawrence (search for this): chapter 9
thousand dollars, or nearly that sum, of which he had laid aside from his earnings hardly more than a third. Three friends—Judge Story, Richard Fletcher, and Samuel Lawrence Mr. Lawrence,—brother of Abbott Lawrence, who was at one time Minister to England,—is now a resident of Stockbridge, Mass.— generously proffered loans of oMr. Lawrence,—brother of Abbott Lawrence, who was at one time Minister to England,—is now a resident of Stockbridge, Mass.— generously proffered loans of one thousand dollars each, which he accepted. They were repaid, some time after his return, chiefly, as is supposed, by his mother from the family estate. The journey to Europe was not then as now a rapid and even cheap excursion, which every year is taken by a horde of tourists. It was confined chiefly to merchants who had fowith you the cordial good wishes of Mrs. Norton and myself. May God bless you, and make your life as honorable and useful as you now purpose it shall be! Samuel Lawrence wrote, Dec. 6:— And now, my dear friend, let me say you have many, many ardent friends here who are sincerely attached to you, and who will loo
your room with How fare ye? on my tongue; but alas, the executor and the appraisers were there; your writing table was dissected, and the disjecta membra scattered on the floor, ready to be taken into the sanctum of Mr. Hillard, which they now adorn. One morn I miss'd him at the customed court (scil. Law Library), Along the (side) walk, and near his fav'rite tree; Another came,—nor at his known resort, Nor at the Albion, nor the Dane was he. I am almost tempted to murder the rest of Gray's Elegy, and apply the epitaph, mutatis mutandis. Thus left his home to wander o'er the earth A youth, to fortune and to fame well known: Fair Science frowned not on his generous birth, And Jurisprudence mark'd him for her own. Large was his bounty and his soul sincere, Heaven did . . . coetera desunt. . . . Here am I at the end of my paper, without saying any thing. But this is not composed for publication among the correspondence to be interlarded in your biography; nor is it writte
ind. Oh, that I spoke your tongue! My mortification and humiliation is great to think of my ignorance. In my own language—dear native English!—I am sometimes told that I excel; and how I shall be humbled by my inability to place myself en rapport with the minds which 1 shall meet! I shall write you in German from Germany. There, on the spot, with the mighty genius of your language hovering over me, I will master it. To that my nights and days must be devoted. The spirits of Goethe and Richter and Luther will cry in my ears, trumpet-tongued. I would give Golconda or Potosi or all Mexico, if I had them, for your German tongue. What I shall write abroad I know not. I shall keep a journal, probably a full one, and shall trust to circumstances to suggest and bring out a subject. I shall remember your suggestions; treasure them all. All your requests I shall remember, and let you know that I shall not forget you. Your good advice I shall ponder well. Ante, p. 198. Laertes did no
William Kent (search for this): chapter 9
ess you, and restore you to us with all your anticipations of enjoyment and improvement more than realized! May he be to you a pillar of fire by night and of cloud by day, and shield you from the perils of the land and the deep! If the good wishes of loving hearts were talismans of defence and protection, you would be well guarded indeed; for no one ever went away compassed about with a greater number. Once more, God bless you, and, Farewell. At New York he passed an evening with Chancellor Kent, who gave him books for his voyage; and had pleasant interviews with William C. Russell, Professor Russell, of Cornell University, writes: I saw him when on his way to Europe; he called at my office in New York, handsomely dressed,—I remember the effect of his fashionable drab overcoat,—erect, easy, conscious of his strength; and when after a short visit he hurried off to see, as he said, my man of business, I felt that he had left childish things behind. his classmate John O. Sarg
Henry D. Gilpin (search for this): chapter 9
ety to rush before the public. As ever, faithfully, Chas. Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber. New York, Dec. 7, 1837. my dear Lieber,—I have returned from a flying visit to Washington, where I found the warm reflection of your friendship. Gilpin was very kind to me, and placed me at my ease in the little business which I had on hand. He carried me for a portion of an evening to the President, where I met Forsyth and Woodbury. Henry D. Gilpin, of Philadelphia, was then Solicitor of thHenry D. Gilpin, of Philadelphia, was then Solicitor of the Treasury; John Forsyth, of Georgia, and Levi Woodbury, of New Hampshire, were members of President Van Buren's Cabinet,—the former as Secretary of State, and the latter as Secretary of the Treasury. The conversation turned upon Canadian affairs, and I was astonished by the ignorance which was displayed on this subject. But in a farewell letter, let me not consume your patience or my own by unfruitful politics. The omitted part of this letter relates to Dr. Lieber's Political Ethics, advis
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 9
vation. Dr. Lieber, who joined heartily in Sumner's plans, gave him elaborate advice, specifyingth the exception of Dr. Lieber and Mr. Daveis, Sumner's friends did not encourage his proposed enterWaterston writes: — I perfectly remember Sumner's deciding to go to Europe, and that my father opposed it. He feared Sumner would be spoiled. I do not recall what Judge Story's opinion was; buat going against the President's approval. Sumner's professional savings—and he had no other reskind hearts went with you. Felton wrote to Sumner's father a few weeks later:— You judge reelings unceasingly cherished, that man is Charles Sumner. He has long been very dear to me; and nobefore the public. As ever, faithfully, Chas. Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber. New York, Dec. Faithfully and affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To William Frederick Frick, Baltimoree, Faithfully and affectionately yours, Chas. Sumner. To Professor Simon Greenleaf, Cambridg[12 more...
Andrews Norton (search for this): chapter 9
yours. Dr. Channing wrote:— I need not speak to you of the usual perils of travelling. Local prejudice and illiberal notions are worn off; but there is danger of parting too with what is essentially, immutably good and true. Prof. Andrews Norton, wrote, Nov. 6:— You are, I trust, about to enjoy much and to learn much in Europe, to lay up for life a treasure of intellectual improvement and agreeable recollections. You carry with you the cordial good wishes of Mrs. Norton andMrs. Norton and myself. May God bless you, and make your life as honorable and useful as you now purpose it shall be! Samuel Lawrence wrote, Dec. 6:— And now, my dear friend, let me say you have many, many ardent friends here who are sincerely attached to you, and who will look forward with intense interest to your return home. In the mean time your letters will be looked for with great interest. Mrs. L. begs me to say your note (parting) she received, and will retain near her till we all meet. <
Political Ethics (search for this): chapter 9
w the day is within my grasp,—a few hours, that may be counted soon, with their swift-running sands, are all that is left. I yesterday talked with Fletcher The Misses Appleton, afterwards Mrs. Longfellow and Mrs. Mackintosh. about your Political Ethics. We debated the question, whether a citizen should be obliged, under a penalty, to vote, as he is to serve on the jury. If voting be a duty and not a privilege, should not the duty be enforced by law? At our recent election two of our weadian affairs, and I was astonished by the ignorance which was displayed on this subject. But in a farewell letter, let me not consume your patience or my own by unfruitful politics. The omitted part of this letter relates to Dr. Lieber's Political Ethics, advising at length as to the revision of the manuscript and mode of publication, and giving an account of what Sumner had done to promote public interest in it, and assurance of a continued care for its success while in Europe. . . . And
John Stuart Wortley (search for this): chapter 9
riends to supply them who were not less kindly than those now best remembered for their good offices to the pilgrim poet. Mr. Daveis commended him to Earl Fitzwilliam and Lord Jeffrey, both having volunteered to receive any of his friends whom he might be pleased to introduce to them, and also to Lord Denman and others, with whom he was on less familiar terms. Mr. Rand gave him letters to Lord Denman, Baron Parke, and Solicitor-General Rolfe; Judge Story to Mr. Justice Vaughan and John Stuart Wortley; John Neal to Mrs. Sarah Austin; Washington Allston to Wordsworth; Ralph Waldo Emerson to Carlyle; Professor Parker Cleaveland, of Bowdoin College, to Sir David Brewster; Dr. Channing to the Baron de Gerando. Dr. Lieber did his utmost to make his journey agreeable at the time and permanently improving, warmly certifying of his character and acquisitions to continental jurists and savans,—notably Mittermaier and the younger Thibaut, as well as to his English friends. Such letters are
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