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Robert Monsey Rolfe (search for this): chapter 9
ere essential; and like Milton, two centuries before, he had friends to supply them who were not less kindly than those now best remembered for their good offices to the pilgrim poet. Mr. Daveis commended him to Earl Fitzwilliam and Lord Jeffrey, both having volunteered to receive any of his friends whom he might be pleased to introduce to them, and also to Lord Denman and others, with whom he was on less familiar terms. Mr. Rand gave him letters to Lord Denman, Baron Parke, and Solicitor-General Rolfe; Judge Story to Mr. Justice Vaughan and John Stuart Wortley; John Neal to Mrs. Sarah Austin; Washington Allston to Wordsworth; Ralph Waldo Emerson to Carlyle; Professor Parker Cleaveland, of Bowdoin College, to Sir David Brewster; Dr. Channing to the Baron de Gerando. Dr. Lieber did his utmost to make his journey agreeable at the time and permanently improving, warmly certifying of his character and acquisitions to continental jurists and savans,—notably Mittermaier and the younger
John O. Sargent (search for this): chapter 9
ncellor Kent, who gave him books for his voyage; and had pleasant interviews with William C. Russell, Professor Russell, of Cornell University, writes: I saw him when on his way to Europe; he called at my office in New York, handsomely dressed,—I remember the effect of his fashionable drab overcoat,—erect, easy, conscious of his strength; and when after a short visit he hurried off to see, as he said, my man of business, I felt that he had left childish things behind. his classmate John O. Sargent, and other friends. The night before he sailed, and early the next morning, he wrote many letters to relatives and friends, some of them covering several pages,—to his sister Julia, to young Frick, a law student in whose progress he had conceived an interest while the latter was an undergraduate, and himself an instructor in the Law School; to Mr. Daveis, Dr. Lieber, Professor Greenleaf, Longfellow, Cleveland, and Hillard. His luggage included a large number of books, copies of the <
Henry W. Longfellow (search for this): chapter 9
several pages,—to his sister Julia, to young Frick, a law student in whose progress he had conceived an interest while the latter was an undergraduate, and himself an instructor in the Law School; to Mr. Daveis, Dr. Lieber, Professor Greenleaf, Longfellow, Cleveland, and Hillard. His luggage included a large number of books, copies of the Jurist, of his Reports, and of the treatises of Judge Story, intended for presentation by himself or on behalf of the judge to English lawyers and judges. d, presented some unexpected impediment. But now the day is within my grasp,—a few hours, that may be counted soon, with their swift-running sands, are all that is left. I yesterday talked with Fletcher The Misses Appleton, afterwards Mrs. Longfellow and Mrs. Mackintosh. about your Political Ethics. We debated the question, whether a citizen should be obliged, under a penalty, to vote, as he is to serve on the jury. If voting be a duty and not a privilege, should not the duty be enforc
Henry R. Cleveland (search for this): chapter 9
ointment which then brought some advantages to a traveller. On the way he stopped at Burlington, N. J., to bid good-by to a friend,—a lady recently betrothed to Cleveland, one of the Five,—tarried a day in Philadelphia where he dined with Mr. Peters and spent the evening with Mr. Ingersoll, and passed a few hours in Baltimore with ere we cease to listen for your wonted footsteps, and to turn instinctively, when the door of our parlor opens, to see you enter. Your affectionate friend. Cleveland wrote from Philadelphia, Jan. 5:— I got a very kind letter from you written from New York just before you sailed. I hope that you got a very kind one fromeived an interest while the latter was an undergraduate, and himself an instructor in the Law School; to Mr. Daveis, Dr. Lieber, Professor Greenleaf, Longfellow, Cleveland, and Hillard. His luggage included a large number of books, copies of the Jurist, of his Reports, and of the treatises of Judge Story, intended for presentation<
the Old World, her world-renowned men, her institutions handed down from distant generations, and her various languages replete with learning and genius. These may I enjoy in the spirit that becomes a Christian and an American! My captain is Johnston, a brother of Miss Johnston, the friend of Mrs. Sparks, and a very good seaman-like fellow. Fellow-passengers are four in number,—one a young man about twenty, a brother of the captain who makes his first trip; another, Mr. Munroe, John MunrMiss Johnston, the friend of Mrs. Sparks, and a very good seaman-like fellow. Fellow-passengers are four in number,—one a young man about twenty, a brother of the captain who makes his first trip; another, Mr. Munroe, John Munroe, afterwards a banker in Paris. a commission merchant of Boston; and two others who I am told are French, though I have not yet been able to distinguish them among the number of strangers who are going down to return in the steamboat. No ladies are aboard. Your father was kind enough to come to the wharf and see me off. I have said farewell to you and all my friends; you know how my heart yearns to them all. Let them know that while I was leaving my native land I thought of them. I hav
Thomas Donaldson (search for this): chapter 9
regard; and may God bless you all. Faithfully and affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To William Frederick Frick, Baltimore, Md. Astor House, New York, Dec. 7, 1837. my dear Frick,—I feel unwilling to leave the country, not to return perhaps until after the completion of your professional studies, without venturing to say a word to you of advice and encouragement, which you will receive as from a friend, I trust. My conversation with you during the delightful afternoon at Mr. Donaldson's has interested me much in your course, and as you then appealed to me, I feel anxious to avail myself of the privilege afforded. Let me suggest, then, that you should not hesitate to propose to yourself the highest standard of professional study and acquirement. Be not deterred by its apparent impracticability; but strive zealously, and you will be astonished at the progress you make. If you place a low standard at which to aim, you will not surely rise above it, even if you reach
Charles S. Daveis (search for this): chapter 9
elf with courts and parliaments. See letter to Mr. Daveis of Aug. 4, 1837, ante, p. 192. He had read many bed for their good offices to the pilgrim poet. Mr. Daveis commended him to Earl Fitzwilliam and Lord Jeffreospitality. In his letter to Earl Fitzwilliam, Mr. Daveis, after referring to Sumner's professional learninnecdotes. With the exception of Dr. Lieber and Mr. Daveis, Sumner's friends did not encourage his proposed e a farewell visit of a day to his valued friend, Mr. Daveis, at Portland; taking the boat on the evening of Txt evening. He dined, while in Portland, with Mr. Daveis, meeting at the dinner John Neal, Mr. Neal was tbless you as never friend blessed his friend. Mr. Daveis wrote, Aug. 8:— There will be a good many t, and himself an instructor in the Law School; to Mr. Daveis, Dr. Lieber, Professor Greenleaf, Longfellow, Clelist his interest and that of my friend and host, Mr. Daveis, of Portland. I shall hear of your success acr
he and Richter and Luther will cry in my ears, trumpet-tongued. I would give Golconda or Potosi or all Mexico, if I had them, for your German tongue. What I shall write abroad I know not. I shall keep a journal, probably a full one, and shall trust to circumstances to suggest and bring out a subject. I shall remember your suggestions; treasure them all. All your requests I shall remember, and let you know that I shall not forget you. Your good advice I shall ponder well. Ante, p. 198. Laertes did not receive better instructions from old Polonius, when he was about going abroad, than you have given me. My heart is full on account of your kindness. It is now Oct. 21, and I shall be more than a week longer in Boston. I shall leave my home Nov. 1. My business is not all closed yet, and I sometimes fear that I may lose another week; but I must tear away. Then for New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington. You will hear from me often before I go, and I shall send longin
Jeremy Bentham (search for this): chapter 9
by no common aspiration. Early in November he made a farewell visit of a day to his valued friend, Mr. Daveis, at Portland; taking the boat on the evening of Tuesday, the seventh, and leaving that city on his return the next evening. He dined, while in Portland, with Mr. Daveis, meeting at the dinner John Neal, Mr. Neal was through life a busy writer of poetry and prose. He was born Oct. 25, 1793, and died June 20. 1876. In early life, while in Europe, he lived for a time with Jeremy Bentham, an association which brought him into relations with the Benthamites, particularly the Austins. Mr. Neal, not long before his death, thus wrote with reference to Sumner's visit:He appeared with a right royal presence, his countenance characterized by a genuine warmth and great readiness; in a word, it was that of a highly bred, well-informed gentleman of a somewhat older school than I was in the way of meeting. and later in the afternoon Stephen Longfellow, the father of the poet. A
Martin Buren (search for this): chapter 9
York, Dec. 7, 1837. my dear Lieber,—I have returned from a flying visit to Washington, where I found the warm reflection of your friendship. Gilpin was very kind to me, and placed me at my ease in the little business which I had on hand. He carried me for a portion of an evening to the President, where I met Forsyth and Woodbury. Henry D. Gilpin, of Philadelphia, was then Solicitor of the Treasury; John Forsyth, of Georgia, and Levi Woodbury, of New Hampshire, were members of President Van Buren's Cabinet,—the former as Secretary of State, and the latter as Secretary of the Treasury. The conversation turned upon Canadian affairs, and I was astonished by the ignorance which was displayed on this subject. But in a farewell letter, let me not consume your patience or my own by unfruitful politics. The omitted part of this letter relates to Dr. Lieber's Political Ethics, advising at length as to the revision of the manuscript and mode of publication, and giving an account of
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