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Puritan (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
calling, which shall engross your time and give you position and fame, and besides enable you to benefit your fellow-men. Do not waste your time in driblets. Deem every moment precious,—far more so than the costliest stones. Make a rule, then, that you will pursue some regular studies at all seasons; and keep some good book constantly on hand to occupy every stray moment. And consider your evenings,—how full of precious time, with boundless opportunities of study! Do use them. I am no Puritan, and would not debar you from innocent pleasures; but there is a moderation to be observed. My head swims so with the motion of the vessel that I cannot write much longer. Preserve an affectionate heart for your family, friends, and society, and be not forward or vain. Believe that modesty and a retiring disposition are better recommendations than the contrary. The letter is called for to be carried up by the steamer; and so good-by, and believe me affectionately yours, Chas. I wis
Mexico, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
norance. In my own language—dear native English!—I am sometimes told that I excel; and how I shall be humbled by my inability to place myself en rapport with the minds which 1 shall meet! I shall write you in German from Germany. There, on the spot, with the mighty genius of your language hovering over me, I will master it. To that my nights and days must be devoted. The spirits of Goethe and Richter and Luther will cry in my ears, trumpet-tongued. I would give Golconda or Potosi or all Mexico, if I had them, for your German tongue. What I shall write abroad I know not. I shall keep a journal, probably a full one, and shall trust to circumstances to suggest and bring out a subject. I shall remember your suggestions; treasure them all. All your requests I shall remember, and let you know that I shall not forget you. Your good advice I shall ponder well. Ante, p. 198. Laertes did not receive better instructions from old Polonius, when he was about going abroad, than you have gi
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 9
Plan your journey. 2. Spend money carefully. 3. Preserve newspapers, hand-bills, &c. 4. Concentrate your attention for lasting impressions. 5. Take views—as of Paris from Montmartre—from elevated places, steeples, hills, &c. 6. Keep steadily a journal; let it be the carte of the day. Never think that an impression is too vividbut the right winds and auspices and influences with my most fervent wishes will certainly follow you in all your wanderings. Write to me soon after you arrive at Paris; and especially and fully from England, where our admiration and affections fully meet. I have commended you very cordially to Ticknor, and I authorize you to drars are four in number,—one a young man about twenty, a brother of the captain who makes his first trip; another, Mr. Munroe, John Munroe, afterwards a banker in Paris. a commission merchant of Boston; and two others who I am told are French, though I have not yet been able to distinguish them among the number of strangers who a<
France (France) (search for this): chapter 9
rite down first impressions of men and countries. 14. Note large and noble fabrics. 15. See the Vatican by torchlight. 16. [Names of various eminent persons in France, Germany, and other countries to be seen; including Mittermaier, the Thibauts, and Bunsen,—the last well worth knowing, and one of the best antiquarians in Rome.]e present,—a sort of banished friend, whom we can ill spare at any time, and least of all just now. Depend upon it, the waves of the Atlantic, as they waft you to France and England, will carry our warmest, truest prayers, constant and fervid, for blessings on you. But no more of this, or I shall relapse into sober sadness. . . . r:— You judge rightly that any intelligence of Charles's welfare would be most acceptable to me, and I congratulate you from my heart on his safe arrival in France. He is now in the full enjoyment of eager and enlightened curiosity fully gratified, and if ever a young man merited such good fortune, by fine talents nobly emp<
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
As ever, faithfully, Chas. Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber. New York, Dec. 7, 1837. my dear Lieber,—I have returned from a flying visit to Washington, where I found the warm reflection of your friendship. Gilpin was very kind to me, and placed me at my ease in the little business which I had on hand. He carried me for a portion of an evening to the President, where I met Forsyth and Woodbury. Henry D. Gilpin, of Philadelphia, was then Solicitor of the Treasury; John Forsyth, of Georgia, and Levi Woodbury, of New Hampshire, were members of President Van Buren's Cabinet,—the former as Secretary of State, and the latter as Secretary of the Treasury. The conversation turned upon Canadian affairs, and I was astonished by the ignorance which was displayed on this subject. But in a farewell letter, let me not consume your patience or my own by unfruitful politics. The omitted part of this letter relates to Dr. Lieber's Political Ethics, advising at length as to the revision
Littleton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
u will not consider me as suggesting too much when I add, Study the Norman or Law French. A few hours a day for a few weeks will give you a competent knowledge of it. There is a dictionary of the language by Kelham, but it is very poor, and you must rely upon your good wits to assist you. At the beginning of the Instructor Clericalis, you will find a list of the principal abbreviations which prevail in the black-letter. Commence studying Norman by reading Littleton in an old copy of Coke-Littleton. There the translation will serve for a dictionary. Then attempt The Mirror or Britton, and a few pages of the Year-Books. Do not consider that you will never have any use for this learning, and therefore that it is not worth the time it costs to obtain it. A few weeks will suffice to make you such a proficient in it that you will never again be obliged to study it. I assure you that I have found occasion for my scanty knowledge of this; and that, slight as it is, at two different times
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
r. To Dr. Francis Lieber. New York, Dec. 7, 1837. my dear Lieber,—I have returned from a flying visit to Washington, where I found the warm reflection of your friendship. Gilpin was very kind to me, and placed me at my ease in the little business which I had on hand. He carried me for a portion of an evening to the President, where I met Forsyth and Woodbury. Henry D. Gilpin, of Philadelphia, was then Solicitor of the Treasury; John Forsyth, of Georgia, and Levi Woodbury, of New Hampshire, were members of President Van Buren's Cabinet,—the former as Secretary of State, and the latter as Secretary of the Treasury. The conversation turned upon Canadian affairs, and I was astonished by the ignorance which was displayed on this subject. But in a farewell letter, let me not consume your patience or my own by unfruitful politics. The omitted part of this letter relates to Dr. Lieber's Political Ethics, advising at length as to the revision of the manuscript and mode of publ
Havre (France) (search for this): chapter 9
, let me not consume your patience or my own by unfruitful politics. The omitted part of this letter relates to Dr. Lieber's Political Ethics, advising at length as to the revision of the manuscript and mode of publication, and giving an account of what Sumner had done to promote public interest in it, and assurance of a continued care for its success while in Europe. . . . And now, my dear friend, we must part. The sea will soon receive me on its stormy bosom. To-morrow I embark for Havre, and I assure you it is with a palpitating heart that I think of it. Hope and joyous anticipations send a thrill through me; but a deep anxiety and sense of the importance of the step check the thrill of pleasure. I need say nothing to you, I believe, in justification of my course, as you enter with lively feelings into my ambition and desires. Believe me, that I know my position and duties; and though I trust Europe may improve me, and return me to my own dear country with a more thorough
Potosi, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
think of my ignorance. In my own language—dear native English!—I am sometimes told that I excel; and how I shall be humbled by my inability to place myself en rapport with the minds which 1 shall meet! I shall write you in German from Germany. There, on the spot, with the mighty genius of your language hovering over me, I will master it. To that my nights and days must be devoted. The spirits of Goethe and Richter and Luther will cry in my ears, trumpet-tongued. I would give Golconda or Potosi or all Mexico, if I had them, for your German tongue. What I shall write abroad I know not. I shall keep a journal, probably a full one, and shall trust to circumstances to suggest and bring out a subject. I shall remember your suggestions; treasure them all. All your requests I shall remember, and let you know that I shall not forget you. Your good advice I shall ponder well. Ante, p. 198. Laertes did not receive better instructions from old Polonius, when he was about going abroad, th
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ons for departure, and when about to embark, he received many letters from friends, expressing deep interest in his welfare, and full of benedictions. Dr. Lieber, who addressed him as Young man on the threshold of a great life, wrote from Columbia, S. C., Oct. 7,— How I would enjoy an intense, deep, and vast life could I accompany you, and learn, admire, adore with you, and initiate you in the great temple of the beautiful and good! And again, Oct. 17:— Good-by, my dear friened a large number of books, copies of the Jurist, of his Reports, and of the treatises of Judge Story, intended for presentation by himself or on behalf of the judge to English lawyers and judges. Letters. To Dr. Francis Lieber, Columbia, S. C. Boston, Oct. 21, 1837. Your last letters of Oct. 7 and Oct. 16 (last by express mail) have quite touched my heart by their fulness and warmth. I owe you a deep debt— The debt immense of endless gratitude for your thorough interest i<
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