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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
gs and doings of the giants of the legal and political world with whom he is so familiar. We think it a piece of rare good fortune for you; and, to whisper you another truth, we deem ourselves fortunate to have sent them so good a specimen of New England and of the law. See all you can, and profit by all you see. See quite through the Jacobinism and Radicalism and atheism of modern Europe, and all its other isms, and come home a sound and liberal conservative, as God made you; neither bigotedight page of human life, and with most extraordinary good fortune. It will be worth to you more or less, as you may choose. I do not yet regret the step you took. If you can return to us and to our habits of business, as if you had not left New England, bringing your great acquisitions in Europe into active service at home,—as I trust with confidence you will do,—the gain will be clear and decisive; and I think you will find no difficulty in resuming your place in the profession. We must gi
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ply to James T. Austin, a defender of the deed. Pennsylvania Hall, then recently erected by the abolitionists in Philadelphia, was burned by a pro-slavery mob. Dr. Channing was replying to Henry Clay's defence of slavery. Letter to Jonathan Phillips, 1839. Channing's Works, Vol. V. pp. 7-106. The Graves-Cilley duel, between a Southern and a Northern member of Congress, was fought. The North-eastern boundary dispute was waxing warm, and there was much wild talk, particularly in the State of Maine, of war with England. A graver difficulty had arisen at another point on our frontier. The burning of the Caroline on the American shore by the British authorities—her offence being that she had been freshly used for hostile purposes by Canadian insurgents— inflamed public feeling against Great Britain, and raised vexed questions concerning the inviolability of national territory, and the jurisdiction of courts over acts assumed by a foreign government. The restriction or prohibition
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1
lective studies were allowed, and lectures admitted in part as a substitute for recitations. The new Library—Gore Hall—built of Quincy granite, was rising. The Law School numbered seventy pupils; and Professor Greenleaf, sole instructor when Judge Story was absent on judicial service, found himself overburdened with work. In literature there was new activity. Prescott's Ferdinand and Isabella, his first work, was winning golden opinions, and he was making researches for his Conquest of Mexico. Cleveland was writing the Life of Henry Hudson for Sparks's American Biography, and editing Sallust. Hillard was completing his edition of Spenser. Felton was preparing a Greek Reader, and translating Menzel's History of German Literature. Longfellow published The Psalm of Life in Sept., 1838, and a few months later Hyperion and The Voices of the Night. Dr. Lieber visited Boston to superintend the publication of the Political Ethics. Motley was writing Morton's Hope. Greenleaf was ga
France (France) (search for this): chapter 1
e, other things alike, a young man is received with more empressement than a middle-aged one. Mrs. Samuel Lawrence wrote, May 12, 1838:— I will not say with how much regret I found my Saturday evenings broken up. I think we enjoyed them so much that I trust the memory of them will induce a renewal at some future day. Then we shall have the extra pleasure of hearing your feats of valor and adventure. Your anticipations, you say, great as they were, were fully realized on landing in France. I think you peculiarly fitted to enjoy travelling. All is novelty and freshness, and with your energy, ardor, and untiring perseverance no information will be left vnattained, and no rational pleasure unsought. You have my best wishes that nothing may occur to mar this enjoyment. Dr. Palfrey wrote, Sept. 25:— You are, I will not say an enviable, but certainly a very fortunate, man; and are thus another illustration of the connection between good luck and good conduct. Gover
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
, of Edinburgh, was delivering lectures on phrenology in Boston. Horace Mann was urging with prodigious earnestness and industry the cause of education. Daniel Webster was about to sail for Europe on his only foreign journey. The Sirius and Great Western were traversing the Atlantic,—the beginning of that ocean steam-navigation which was to give a new force to civilization. The first arrival of the Sirius and,Great Western at New York was on April 23, 1838. Nineteen years earlier, the Savannah made a single experimental trip. At Harvard College and the Law School all was well. Two terms a year now took the place of three; elective studies were allowed, and lectures admitted in part as a substitute for recitations. The new Library—Gore Hall—built of Quincy granite, was rising. The Law School numbered seventy pupils; and Professor Greenleaf, sole instructor when Judge Story was absent on judicial service, found himself overburdened with work. In literature there was new a<
Canadian (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ps, 1839. Channing's Works, Vol. V. pp. 7-106. The Graves-Cilley duel, between a Southern and a Northern member of Congress, was fought. The North-eastern boundary dispute was waxing warm, and there was much wild talk, particularly in the State of Maine, of war with England. A graver difficulty had arisen at another point on our frontier. The burning of the Caroline on the American shore by the British authorities—her offence being that she had been freshly used for hostile purposes by Canadian insurgents— inflamed public feeling against Great Britain, and raised vexed questions concerning the inviolability of national territory, and the jurisdiction of courts over acts assumed by a foreign government. The restriction or prohibition of the sale of ardent spirits —a controversy which forty years of agitation have not settled —was for the first time disturbing politicians. Richard Fletcher was re-elected to Congress as the member for Boston. George Bancroft was appointed Collec
China (China) (search for this): chapter 1
had spread unusual distrust. Few local improvements were in progress; but it was thought worthy of record at the time that around the Common had been built a sidewalk, which, as a much-frequented promenade, was called The Lovers' Chase. The domestic life of Sumner's friends underwent changes. Cleveland and Felton were now both married. The former was living at Pine Bank, near Jamaica Pond, and the latter in a new house he had built at Cambridge. Captain R. B. Forbes was embarking for China to make another fortune. Hillard met with one of the saddest of bereavements,—the loss of an only child. Young William Story had passed from College to Law School, and was making his first essays in sculpture,—the busts of his father and a classmate. The Five of Clubs, now four only,—Felton, Cleveland, Hillard, Longfellow,—kept up their reunions, always commemorating at firesides and in feasts the loved member whose seat was vacant; and there were many callers at Number Four Court Street
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
months passed between Sumner's parting with his friends in Boston and his leaving England for the Continent; and a reference to matters of public and personal interest occurring at home may be fitly included in this narrative. At a meeting held in Faneuil Hall, on the day he sailed, Dr. Channing, Hillard, and George Bond denounced the murder of Lovejoy, the anti-slavery editor; and Wendell Phillips began his career as an orator by his reply to James T. Austin, a defender of the deed. Pennsylvania Hall, then recently erected by the abolitionists in Philadelphia, was burned by a pro-slavery mob. Dr. Channing was replying to Henry Clay's defence of slavery. Letter to Jonathan Phillips, 1839. Channing's Works, Vol. V. pp. 7-106. The Graves-Cilley duel, between a Southern and a Northern member of Congress, was fought. The North-eastern boundary dispute was waxing warm, and there was much wild talk, particularly in the State of Maine, of war with England. A graver difficulty had
Jamaica Pond (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
the most remarkable in our history,—which began in 1837, still continued. The failure of some Boston banks had spread unusual distrust. Few local improvements were in progress; but it was thought worthy of record at the time that around the Common had been built a sidewalk, which, as a much-frequented promenade, was called The Lovers' Chase. The domestic life of Sumner's friends underwent changes. Cleveland and Felton were now both married. The former was living at Pine Bank, near Jamaica Pond, and the latter in a new house he had built at Cambridge. Captain R. B. Forbes was embarking for China to make another fortune. Hillard met with one of the saddest of bereavements,—the loss of an only child. Young William Story had passed from College to Law School, and was making his first essays in sculpture,—the busts of his father and a classmate. The Five of Clubs, now four only,—Felton, Cleveland, Hillard, Longfellow,—kept up their reunions, always commemorating at firesides
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
th less frequency were Longfellow, Mr. Daveis, Luther S. Cushing (who wrote concerning The Jurist), Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lawrence, Richard Fletcher, Willard Phillips, and Benjamin Rand; and, after their return from Europe, Mr. Ticknor and Dr. Shattuck. His letters to Judge Story and Hillard were read by other intimate friends, and his experiences became quite generally known in Boston and Cambridge. Americans returning from Europe reported his success in English society. His speech at Newcastle, which was read in a Boston newspaper, was much commended. His social career abroad attracted attention at home, and his return was awaited with unusual interest. The general opinion and expectation concerning him may be best gathered from the letters written to him at the time. One cannot fail to notice, even beneath their assurances of confidence to the contrary, serious apprehensions that his rich draughts of foreign life would give him a distaste for professional work. Cleveland
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