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rning and pettifogging habits (I must use the phrase) which characterize so large a part of the lawyers of America. The omitted part of the letter is chiefly a strong plea for an interest in Crawford. . . .I shall be in Boston in December or January. Let me hear from you there at least, if not before; and believe me, as ever, Most sincerely yours, C. S. To George W. Greene, Rome. Florence, Sept. 11, 1839. dear Greene,—I have thought of you every hour since I left Rome; but have dnna; three weeks in Vienna,—a master all the time; then to Prague, Dresden, Berlin, and probably next down to Heidelberg,—an immense sweep; then down the Rhine into Belgium, to London, where I expect to be at the end of December or beginning of January. Venice is a sort of jumping-off place. I am here equally distant from Vienna and Athens. I can be at either in less than seven days. I have ordered my letters to Vienna, where I expect to find a batch of two months. This is a temptation to t<
there is a young American sculptor here, Mr. Thomas Crawford, who has great merit, and has found considerable favor among artists. Laudatur et alget.Can't something be done for him in Boston? I shall write at length to Hillard or Longfellow about him, and should feel much gratified if you would counsel with them as to the proper way of promoting his interests. C. S. To George S. Hillard. Rome, July 13, 1839. dear Hillard,—I have now before me all your kind, very kind, letters of March 19, April 29, and May 23. In the first you say, I wonder where you are just now, &c. I opened this letter and read it on the Capitoline Hill, with those steps in view over which the friars walked while Gibbon contemplated; the wonderful equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius before me; while thickening about in every direction were the associations of Old Rome. I need not say that your page was more interesting even than that mighty leaf of history then for the first time open before me. Yo
April 18th (search for this): chapter 14
the tomb of the Curiatii, descried the dome of St. Peter's and Rome! I have now driven within sight of the Colosseum and the Arch of Constantine, and under Trajan's Column! My fondest expectations are all on tiptoe. Good-by and love to you all. Most affectionately ever, Charles Sumner. To William H. Prescott, Boston. Piazza di Spagna, Rome, June 28, 1839. my dear Sir,—Amidst saddening and perplexing intelligence from opposite quarters, I received your agreeable letter of the 18th April. Ante,Vol. I. p. 308, note. I have done nothing worthy of the thanks you have been so good as to send me. The debt is on my side; for, over and above the great satisfaction I derived from the hasty perusal of your work (during a few of the odd hours rescued from society and sight-seeing), I experienced in England a constant pleasure from the honor which it has reflected upon our country, and the favorable impression it is calculated to inspire with regard to the American mind. Wherever
April 19th (search for this): chapter 14
a young American sculptor here, Mr. Thomas Crawford, who has great merit, and has found considerable favor among artists. Laudatur et alget.Can't something be done for him in Boston? I shall write at length to Hillard or Longfellow about him, and should feel much gratified if you would counsel with them as to the proper way of promoting his interests. C. S. To George S. Hillard. Rome, July 13, 1839. dear Hillard,—I have now before me all your kind, very kind, letters of March 19, April 29, and May 23. In the first you say, I wonder where you are just now, &c. I opened this letter and read it on the Capitoline Hill, with those steps in view over which the friars walked while Gibbon contemplated; the wonderful equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius before me; while thickening about in every direction were the associations of Old Rome. I need not say that your page was more interesting even than that mighty leaf of history then for the first time open before me. Your other
April 20th (search for this): chapter 14
Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. Leaving Paris April 20, and going by way of Lyons, Sumner embarked at Marseilles, May 3, by steamer for Naples. On the route he visited Genoa, See his description of Genoa, July 4, 1845, in The True Grandeur of Nations: She still sits in queenly pride as she sat then,—her mural crown studded with towers; her churches rich with marble floors and rarest pictures; her palaces of ancient doges and admirals yet spared by the hand of Time; her close streets thronged by a hundred thousand inhabitants,—at the foot of the Apennines as they approach the blue and tideless waters of the Mediterranean Sea, leaning her back against their strong mountain-sides, overshadowed by the foliage of the fig-tree and the olive, while the orange and the lemon with pleasant perfume scent the air where reigns perpetual spring. Who can contemplate such a city without delight?—Works, Vol. I. p. 26. Leghorn, and Pisa, and was kept a day at the unatt
April 24th (search for this): chapter 14
a great sculptor. This friendship, let me add, never abated through life. Crawford never forgot the debt of gratitude he owed him; and Sumner always took the most earnest and active interest in him and his works, and never failed to chant his praise. After Crawford's death, we went together over his studio; and the tears came into Sumner's eyes, as he spoke of the old days, and the untimely end of our friend. Tidings reached Sumner at Rome of his father's death, which had taken place April 24. He had languished for several weeks, and the end was not unexpected. He had reached the age of sixty-three,—a year which he had, for some time, designated as likely to prove fatal to him. The family, in communicating the event, urged Charles not to allow it to affect his plans of travelling, or to speed his return. The character of his father has already been given,—just, but severe and rigid. Felton wrote, in relation to his death: President Quincy spoke of his character as a high-mi
Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. Leaving Paris April 20, and going by way of Lyons, Sumner embarked at Marseilles, May 3, by steamer for Naples. On the route he visited Genoa, See his description of Genoa, July 4, 1845, in The True Grandeur of Nations: She still sits in queenly pride as she sat then,—her mural crown studded with towers; her churches rich with marble floors and rarest pictures; her palaces of ancient doges and admirals yet spared by the hand of Time;ching creations of modern art, has succeeded to the Vatican whose thunders intermingled with the strifes of modern Europe. Works, Vol. I. pp. 275-276 Letters. To George S. Hillard. Naples, May 19, 1839. Embarked at Marseilles, May 3, in the steamer Pharamond; touched and passed two days at Genoa, wandered among its palaces and groves of oranges, and enjoyed its paintings. Next stopped at Leghorn long enough to make a most delightful excursion to Pisa, to ascend its leaning <
dard of the convent in this department of knowledge, spoke of England as divided into seven kingdoms,—one of which was Mercia, another Northumberland, &c.; actually going back to the Heptarchy! The English possessions in America were represented as being taken (tolte)from Spain; and of these, Bostona was the capital; but the great commercial place of America was Vera Cruz. When I get home, I will tell you what sort of people monks are. Only a few days ago, I received your kind letter of May 17. I deeply appreciate your sympathy in my father's death. Such a relation cannot be severed without awakening the strongest emotions; and though I cannot affect to feel entirely the grief that others have on such a bereavement, yet it has been to me a source of unfeigned sorrow, and has thrown a shadow across my Italian pleasures. In the education of my young brother and sisters I have always interested myself as much as I was allowed to, from the moment in which I had any education myself
shadowed by the foliage of the fig-tree and the olive, while the orange and the lemon with pleasant perfume scent the air where reigns perpetual spring. Who can contemplate such a city without delight?—Works, Vol. I. p. 26. Leghorn, and Pisa, and was kept a day at the unattractive port of Civita Vecchia. While at Naples, where he remained about twelve days, he visited the well-known points of interest,—the Museum, Lake Avernus, Misenum, Baiae, Capri, Pompeii, and Vesuvius. Leaving Naples May 20, and riding during the night, he had the next day his first view of St. Peter's from the Alban hills. That moment a darling vision of childhood and youth was fulfilled. No pilgrim ever entered the Imperial City with a richer enthusiasm,— not even Goethe, who, in his German home, could not, for some time before he crossed the Alps, look at an engraving of Italian scenery or read a Latin book, because of the pang they gave him. Here Sumner remained till the close of August. Rome and the Cam<
the nicety with which they drive a bargain; and as one of them has always held our common purse and acted as manager, I have had the benefit of it without the trouble. To-morrow we start together, in a carriage we have hired, for Rome. Rome, May 21. I am in the Eternal City. We passed through dirty Capua (shorn of all its soft temptations); with difficulty found a breakfast of chocolate and bread where Hannibal's victorious troops wasted with luxury and excess; enjoyed the perfume of thean to learn; but I have the consolation of knowing that I know as much about it now, as I did of Italian when I came to Italy. I did not understand the Carta di Sicurezza that was given me at the gate of San Giovanni, when I entered Rome, the 21st of May. At the first town that I come to in Germany I shall stop, take a master, and commence an assault for one week; then move on, studying on the road to Vienna; three weeks in Vienna,—a master all the time; then to Prague, Dresden, Berlin, and p
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