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Prague (Czech Republic) (search for this): chapter 14
ud of him. . . . I have German to learn; but I have the consolation of knowing that I know as much about it now, as I did of Italian when I came to Italy. I did not understand the Carta di Sicurezza that was given me at the gate of San Giovanni, when I entered Rome, the 21st of May. At the first town that I come to in Germany I shall stop, take a master, and commence an assault for one week; then move on, studying on the road to Vienna; three weeks in Vienna,—a master all the time; then to Prague, Dresden, Berlin, and probably next down to Heidelberg,—an immense sweep; then down the Rhine into Belgium, to London, where I expect to be at the end of December or beginning of January. Venice is a sort of jumping-off place. I am here equally distant from Vienna and Athens. I can be at either in less than seven days. I have ordered my letters to Vienna, where I expect to find a batch of two months. This is a temptation to the North; but there are the Piraeus and Marathon! I am strongl
Genoa (Italy) (search for this): chapter 14
ptember, 1839.—Age, 28. Leaving Paris April 20, and going by way of Lyons, Sumner embarked at Marseilles, May 3, by steamer for Naples. On the route he visited Genoa, See his description of Genoa, July 4, 1845, in The True Grandeur of Nations: She still sits in queenly pride as she sat then,—her mural crown studded with toweGenoa, July 4, 1845, in The True Grandeur of Nations: She still sits in queenly pride as she sat then,—her mural crown studded with towers; her churches rich with marble floors and rarest pictures; her palaces of ancient doges and admirals yet spared by the hand of Time; her close streets thronged by a hundred thousand inhabitants,—at the foot of the Apennines as they approach the blue and tideless waters of the Mediterranean Sea, leaning her back against their str75-276 Letters. To George S. Hillard. Naples, May 19, 1839. Embarked at Marseilles, May 3, in the steamer Pharamond; touched and passed two days at Genoa, wandered among its palaces and groves of oranges, and enjoyed its paintings. Next stopped at Leghorn long enough to make a most delightful excursion to Pisa, to
Saint Marks (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
. Wilde is busy with the Life of Dante. Have you seen Vol. I. of the Reports of the Venetian Ambassadors? They will make twenty volumes when published. I shall leave Florence Monday next; stay a day or two at Bologna, and five or seven at Venice. To George S. Hillard. Palazzo Giustiniani, Venice, Sept. 29, 1839. my dear Hillard,—Among canals, amidst the cries and songs of gondoliers, and the gentle splash of their oars, from the isles of Venice, under the shadow of the Lion of St. Mark, I write you now. At the price of a blot I will mark on the above view the house and room where I am. Would that you were here to look with me upon the gilded water, and then to stroll under the arcades of the great Piazza,—the ancient centre of the doings of that proud, rich, and cruel republic. When shall we be respected by Kings and Emperors as was Venice? All addressed her, even Charles V., as Inclita Republica,—Serenissima Republica. A trumpet to rouse the pride of the people were <
Venice (Italy) (search for this): chapter 14
ith ropes, old leather, and the like. Leaving Venice on the last day of September, after a week's vo! But I must be elsewhere. My next place is Venice, where I shall stay but two or three days or aIf you do not write me I shall have nothing at Venice to read fresher than Paul Sarpi or Paruta. No a day or two at Bologna, and five or seven at Venice. To George S. Hillard. Palazzo Giustiniani, Venice, Sept. 29, 1839. my dear Hillard,—Among canals, amidst the cries and songs of gondoliersgentle splash of their oars, from the isles of Venice, under the shadow of the Lion of St. Mark, I wl we be respected by Kings and Emperors as was Venice? All addressed her, even Charles V., as Incli me repeatedly: I called upon him once, &c. In Venice, I have letters to some of the first people: Iwrite him. It is something to send a wish from Venice to Canton vid Boston. It is equal to Pope's Wdear Greene,—I was thankful for your letter at Venice, and only regretted that it was not closely wr[7 more...]<
San Pietro (Italy) (search for this): chapter 14
o out; dined in a garden under a mulberry tree, chiefly on fruits, salads, and wine, with the occasional interjection of a soup or steak: the fruits were apricots, green almonds, and figs; the salads, those of the exception under the second declension of nouns in our old Latin Grammar; the wines, the light, cooling, delicious product of the country. By this time Greene came to me,—in accomplishments and attainments our country has not fivemen his peers,— and we walked to the Forum, or to San Pietro, or out of one of the gates of Rome: many an hour have we sat upon a broken column or a rich capital in the Via Sacra, or the Colosseum, and called to mind what has passed before them, weaving out the web of the story they might tell; and then, leaping countries and seas, we have joined our friends at home, and with them shared our pleasures. After an ice-cream we parted; I to my books again, or sometimes with him to his house, where over a supper not unlike the dinner I have described, w
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ence an assault for one week; then move on, studying on the road to Vienna; three weeks in Vienna,—a master all the time; then to Prague, DresVienna,—a master all the time; then to Prague, Dresden, Berlin, and probably next down to Heidelberg,—an immense sweep; then down the Rhine into Belgium, to London, where I expect to be at theice is a sort of jumping-off place. I am here equally distant from Vienna and Athens. I can be at either in less than seven days. I have ordered my letters to Vienna, where I expect to find a batch of two months. This is a temptation to the North; but there are the Piraeus and Marathon! I am strongly tempted. My next will be to you from Vienna or Athens. Which had you rather it should be? Tell me in your next. I hopth Mrs. Greene in her own sweet tongue. Do not fail to write me at Vienna immediately,—care of Arnstein & Eskeles. As ever, yours affectioharles Sumner. P. S. What a parcel of letters I shall find in Vienna,—the accumulation of two months and a half! I shall then hear fr
St. Peter (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
here he remained about twelve days, he visited the well-known points of interest,—the Museum, Lake Avernus, Misenum, Baiae, Capri, Pompeii, and Vesuvius. Leaving Naples May 20, and riding during the night, he had the next day his first view of St. Peter's from the Alban hills. That moment a darling vision of childhood and youth was fulfilled. No pilgrim ever entered the Imperial City with a richer enthusiasm,— not even Goethe, who, in his German home, could not, for some time before he crossn the heavy gates through which we entered the territories of the Supreme Pontiff; rode all night; crossed for twenty-eight miles the Pontine marshes; and at length, from the heights of Alba, near the tomb of the Curiatii, descried the dome of St. Peter's and Rome! I have now driven within sight of the Colosseum and the Arch of Constantine, and under Trajan's Column! My fondest expectations are all on tiptoe. Good-by and love to you all. Most affectionately ever, Charles Sumner. To W
Vesuvius (Italy) (search for this): chapter 14
Leghorn, and Pisa, and was kept a day at the unattractive port of Civita Vecchia. While at Naples, where he remained about twelve days, he visited the well-known points of interest,—the Museum, Lake Avernus, Misenum, Baiae, Capri, Pompeii, and Vesuvius. Leaving Naples May 20, and riding during the night, he had the next day his first view of St. Peter's from the Alban hills. That moment a darling vision of childhood and youth was fulfilled. No pilgrim ever entered the Imperial City with a r the greatest I cannot tell,—whether when I walked amidst the streets of Pompeii, and trod the beautiful mosaics of its houses; or when I visited Baiae and Misenum, and looked off upon Capri and Procida; or when I mounted the rough lava sides of Vesuvius, and saw the furnace-like fires which glowed in its yawning cracks and seams. I should like much to go into details about these things, but your own mind will revive, on glancing at these hasty words, volumes that you have read. I think I do n
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
f the Alban Lake, Sumner suddenly exclaimed, as the thought of his deserted law-office came to his mind: Let me see if I can draw a writ! Here, also, while the two friends were walking one day in the woods near the convent, and were for a moment separated, it happened that Sumner fell into a wolf-trap; Greene answered at once his call for help, and soon extricated him from his imprisonment. In his argument of Dec. 4, 1849, against the constitutionality of separate colored schools in Massachusetts, Sumner thus referred to this last visit:— In Italy, at the Convent of Palazzuola, on the shores of the Alban Lake, amidst a scene of natural beauty enhanced by historical association, where I was once a guest, I have for days seen a native of Abyssinia, recently from his torrid home and ignorant of the language spoken about him, mingling in delightful and affectionate familiarity with the Franciscan friars, whose visitor and scholar he was. Do I err in saying that the Christian sp
Vera Cruz, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
it. The librarian told me there were no Mss.; but I found more than a dozen. The work on geography, which seemed to be the standard of the convent in this department of knowledge, spoke of England as divided into seven kingdoms,—one of which was Mercia, another Northumberland, &c.; actually going back to the Heptarchy! The English possessions in America were represented as being taken (tolte)from Spain; and of these, Bostona was the capital; but the great commercial place of America was Vera Cruz. When I get home, I will tell you what sort of people monks are. Only a few days ago, I received your kind letter of May 17. I deeply appreciate your sympathy in my father's death. Such a relation cannot be severed without awakening the strongest emotions; and though I cannot affect to feel entirely the grief that others have on such a bereavement, yet it has been to me a source of unfeigned sorrow, and has thrown a shadow across my Italian pleasures. In the education of my young br
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