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Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 14
ipt of your letter I wrote him from Rome, to let him know that a large number of corrections had been made in the recent American edition. I also wrote Bentley, whom I saw when in London, communicating your wishes. It is a far cry across the Atlantic Ocean, and not a short one from Rome; but I thought the two together—your Western call and my halloo from the East—would certainly be heard in Burlington Street. In London I met a Spaniard, Gayangos, ante,Vol. II. p. 64. an ex-professor of Madrid, who wrote the review of your history in the Edinburgh. I have forgotten his name and address. Hillard, however, has both. He would be pleased to find himself in some way en rapportwith you. He has addicted himself to Spanish subjects, and collected very valuable manuscripts,—some illustrating the life of the Great Captain, to which you had not referred (so he told me); and he expressed the greatest willingness to communicate them to you. If you should care to enter into correspondence wi<
Lyons (France) (search for this): chapter 14
Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. Leaving Paris April 20, and going by way of Lyons, Sumner embarked at Marseilles, May 3, by steamer for Naples. On the route he visited Genoa, See his description of Genoa, July 4, 1845, in The True Grandeur of Nations: She still sits in queenly pride as she sat then,—her mural crown studded with towers; her churches rich with marble floors and rarest pictures; her palaces of ancient doges and admirals yet spared by the hand of Time; her close streets thronged by a hundred thousand inhabitants,—at the foot of the Apennines as they approach the blue and tideless waters of the Mediterranean Sea, leaning her back against their strong mountain-sides, overshadowed by the foliage of the fig-tree and the olive, while the orange and the lemon with pleasant perfume scent the air where reigns perpetual spring. Who can contemplate such a city without delight?—Works, Vol. I. p. 26. Leghorn, and Pisa, and was kept a day at the unat
Lombardy (Italy) (search for this): chapter 14
of his sojourn there as well chosen. Mr. Ticknor wrote to him, Dec. 3, 1839: I agree with you about the season for seeing Italy. I have been there every month of the year except August, and give me the sunshine even at the expense of the heat. He afterwards referred to these days as the happiest of his whole European journey. Thence he went, by way of Siena, to Florence, where he passed a fortnight; and then with a vetturino to Bologna, Ferrara, Rovigo, Padua, and across the plains of Lombardy alone, in a light wagon with a single horse, harnessed with ropes, old leather, and the like. Leaving Venice on the last day of September, after a week's visit, he arrived, Oct. 2, without breaking the journey, at Milan, where his Italian tour ended. Three days later, he took a seat in the malle-poste to cross the Alps by the Stelvio Pass for Innsbruck. Such, in brief, was his route at a period when as yet there was no railway in Italy. His journey, as originally planned, included a
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 14
ad passed some time in Paris. To his brother George, Sumner wrote from Florence a long letter full of counsel on various points,—the latter's proposed book on Russia, his study of languages, his style of writing, intercourse in society, manners, and dress,—in which he said:— There is, perhaps, no other person in the world ver affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. P. S. Rome, July 28.—I have just received a long letter from my brother George, who has penetrated the interior of Russia, Tartary, Circassia, Bithynia, and is now going to the Holy Land. He has seen more of Russia, I doubt not, than any foreigner alive. He is the most remarkable pRussia, I doubt not, than any foreigner alive. He is the most remarkable person of his age I know. Pardon this from a brother. To William F. Frick, Baltimore. Rome, Aug. 4, 1839. my dear Frick, For the letter which Sumner wrote, on sailing for Europe, to his young friend, see ante, Vol. I. pp. 206-209.—Your kind letter, now a year old, gave me great pleasure; and I have been much gratifie
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
d in English: God, what a happy man he must be! I like Capponi much, and regret that I saw so little of him. Of Wilde Richard Henry Wilde, 1789-1847. He represented Georgia in Congress at different times, from 1815 to 1835; was in Europe from 1835 to 1840, residing much of the time in Florence; published a book on The Love, Madness, and Imprisonment of Tasso; undertook a Life of Dante, which he did not live to complete; and became, in 1847, Professor of Common Law in the University of Louisiana. He was fond of literary researches, and his name finds a place among American poets. I have seen very little. I have called upon him and he upon me; but I have found him at home only once, and he has never found me at home. We all talk about you, and wish that you were in Florence. I have missed you not a little; you were my literary banker, who discounted all my drafts at sight: here I have been obliged to work along as I could. I have read nearly all of Macchiavelli. The Storia I
Washington Allston (search for this): chapter 14
e productive of benefit and honor to himself, the college, and our country. Thank God! I am an American. Much as there is to offend me in our country, yet it is the best country to be born in on the face of the globe. In his tribute to Washington Allston, Aug. 27, 1846, there is a description of Italy which was inspired by the memories of these days:– Turning his back upon Paris and the greatness of the Empire, he directed his steps towards Italy, the enchanted ground of literature, hr, &c.; all these various characters being blended in the group. The Abdiel is taken just as he has concluded his speech to Satan and is turning to leave him. It is a winged, heaven-born Achilles. The subject was suggested to Greenough by Washington Allston, years ago. The statue is about three or four feet high; but Greenough means to make one as large as the Apollo Belvedere. He has also done a beautiful little bas-relief for Mr. Salisbury,—the angel telling St. John not to address his pray
George Gibbs (search for this): chapter 14
he Abdiel is taken just as he has concluded his speech to Satan and is turning to leave him. It is a winged, heaven-born Achilles. The subject was suggested to Greenough by Washington Allston, years ago. The statue is about three or four feet high; but Greenough means to make one as large as the Apollo Belvedere. He has also done a beautiful little bas-relief for Mr. Salisbury,—the angel telling St. John not to address his prayers to him but to God; and is now engaged on a bas-relief for Miss Gibbs, to be put in a church at Newport; also busts of Franklin, of Marquis Capponi, &c. I have seen a good deal of Powers. Hiram Powers, 1805-73. He was born in Vermont; removed to Cincinnati; went to Italy in 1837; exhibited his Eve in 1838; and soon after executed the Greek Slave. Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 276-294. He is very pleasant and agreeable. His busts are truly remarkable, close likenesses without coarseness or vulgarity,—without Frazeeism.I asked Greenough if he thought
Richard Monckton Milnes (search for this): chapter 14
society I have seen little, except incidentally, though I have known many individuals. In Naples I did not trouble myself to leave a single letter of introduction. In Rome, the Princess Borghese died two days after my arrival; the French Ambassador had left for the summer before I came. The Countess of Coventry Lady Coventry was the daughter of Aubrey, sixth Duke of St. Albans, and the wife of George William, eighth Earl of Coventry, and the mother of Lady Holland. She died in 1845. Mr. Milnes (Lord Houghton) gave Sumner a letter of introduction to her. had retired to Albano, where she invited me to visit her: I did not go. Others had fled in different directions. In Florence, the Marquesa Lenzonis Medicis—the last of this great family—invited me to her soirees:I went to one. The Marquis Strozzi called upon me: I had not the grace to return his call. The Count Graberg 1776-1847; a distinguished geographer, at one time Swedish Consul in Tripoli; author of an historical essa
Pietro Giordani (search for this): chapter 14
ived at Rome, and was well known among Italian scholars. With him I became quite well acquainted. He took me, on his arrival in Florence, to old Abbate Missirini, Canova's biographer. and to the Marquesa Luzaris, and has given me a letter to Giordani. Pietro Giordani, 1774-1848. He began his career as a lawyer; was afterwards a Benedictine monk; and at one time Professor of Eloquence at the University of Bologna. He published, in 1808, a panegyric of Napoleon. I found Gigli quietly engaPietro Giordani, 1774-1848. He began his career as a lawyer; was afterwards a Benedictine monk; and at one time Professor of Eloquence at the University of Bologna. He published, in 1808, a panegyric of Napoleon. I found Gigli quietly engaged in literary pursuits, one of which is so akin to yours that I am anxious you should know him; and he is quite desirous of your acquaintance. He is preparing a Storia Politica of Italy, and has collected from all the principal libraries such manuscripts as will illustrate his subject. He is an admirer of Botta, and is anxious to talk with you about this historian; A friend of his has in press at Milan a collection of letters from Botta. He is of our own age, and is amiable and agreeable.
ed that and French. In Milan I have stumbled upon a couple of friends, to whom I wish you to be kind, for various reasons,—inasmuch as they are my friends, and are quiet, pleasant, gentlemanly persons; and you will be pleased with them. One is Preston, of Virginia,—the brother of the Senator; the other is Lewis, of Connecticut. The latter spoke French before he left America. Both are desirous of acquiring Italian, but I fear will not have the energy to deal with it properly. I wish you wou talk with Mrs. Greene in her own sweet tongue. Do not fail to write me at Vienna immediately,—care of Arnstein & Eskeles. As ever, yours affectionately, Charles Sumner. P. S. What a parcel of letters I shall find in Vienna,—the accumulation of two months and a half! I shall then hear from the letters about Crawford. How good it would be, if the Franklin and Orpheus were both ordered! Take Preston to Thorwaldsen's studio and the Vatican. What a delicious thing the Pastor
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