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Edward Everett (search for this): chapter 14
lying on a bank in the shade of a broad tree (whether it was a beech I do not remember), reading the Gerusalemme; a Capuchin, with his long beard, had just brought us wine. I showed the venerable father my book, and inquired if he had read it. Ahi! non ho tanta scienza, was his reply. Ever affectionately yours. Charles Sumner. P. S. I wish you would show this to Cleveland, Felton, and Longfellow, and tell them to consider it as addressed to each and all. Can you not speak to Governor Everett, and Ticknor, and Prescott, in Crawford's behalf? But I will not say more, for you will understand my wishes, and I leave the whole to your discretion. To Henry W. Longfellow, Cambridge. Convent of Palazzuola, July 26, 1839. my dear Longfellow,—FraGreene and myself have already withdrawn from the cares of this life,—the world forgetting, by the world forgot. We have sought quiet in a convent, among cowled, thick-robed, sandalled Franciscans. From our retreat, perched high amon
Henry R. Cleveland (search for this): chapter 14
nd through life referred to him always in terms of filial respect. He had no undutiful conduct to recall. He had observed, in boyhood and in manhood, all the obligations of a son. You were a good son, wrote Lieber, in a letter of condolence. Cleveland, who knew all the circumstances of his life at home, wrote: That your duty to him was fully done, must now be a source of infinite satisfaction. But this narrative would be incomplete, if it said no more of this relation of father and son. Thehis long beard, had just brought us wine. I showed the venerable father my book, and inquired if he had read it. Ahi! non ho tanta scienza, was his reply. Ever affectionately yours. Charles Sumner. P. S. I wish you would show this to Cleveland, Felton, and Longfellow, and tell them to consider it as addressed to each and all. Can you not speak to Governor Everett, and Ticknor, and Prescott, in Crawford's behalf? But I will not say more, for you will understand my wishes, and I leave
Richard Henry Wilde (search for this): chapter 14
k upon his Eve. He formed at the same time a pleasant acquaintance with Richard Henry Wilde,—once a member of Congress from Georgia,—then pursuing researches for a Life of Dante, on which he was engaged. At Wilde's request, he traced out at Ferrara some manuscripts of Tasso, and afterwards at Venice others connected with Dantean he must be! I like Capponi much, and regret that I saw so little of him. Of Wilde Richard Henry Wilde, 1789-1847. He represented Georgia in Congress at diffeRichard Henry Wilde, 1789-1847. He represented Georgia in Congress at different times, from 1815 to 1835; was in Europe from 1835 to 1840, residing much of the time in Florence; published a book on The Love, Madness, and Imprisonment of TasIt will seem to everybody a cursed piece of affectation and vanity on my part. Wilde is busy with the Life of Dante. Have you seen Vol. I. of the Reports of the Ve, I was shortly to leave Florence. I still lingered several days; saw more of Wilde, and admired Greenough more. Left Florence with a vetturinofor Bologna, where
s stay in Rome. He will be there in about a month, and wishes to study Italian literature and art. Ah, would that I could be there too! But I must be elsewhere. My next place is Venice, where I shall stay but two or three days or a week. If you do not write me I shall have nothing at Venice to read fresher than Paul Sarpi or Paruta. Nothing that I have seen alters my faith in Crawford. Let him go on, and his way is clear. Remember me most kindly to Mrs. Greene, and give one torment to Ponto, Greene's poodle dog. Sumner was quite fond of him, and enjoyed teasing him in his walks with Greene. and believe me, Ever most sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. P. S. Signor Gigli would like to know Crawford, and will be happy to write about his works in some Italian journal. I have promised him that you will take him to Crawford's studio. Greenough has read me some essays of his on art, which are superior to any thing in the English language after Reynolds, and in some respect
afternoon, when he sallied out for dinner or a walk. With such devotion, his progress even exceeded his expectations. He read not only Dante, Petrarch, Tasso, Boccaccio, Macchiavelli, Guicciardini, Alfieri, and Niccolini, but several minor authors, whose neglected works are explored only by the most assiduous students of Italian I had seen the chief of those things in Rome that require mid-day, so that I was able to keep in the house. I read Dante, Tasso's Gerusalemme, the Decameron of Boccaccio, the Rime of Politian, all the tragedies of Alfieri, the principal dramas of Metastasio —some six vols.,—the Storia Pittorica of Lanzi, the Principe of Macchiavelli, the Aminta of Tasso, the Pastor Fido of Guarini; and much of Monti, of Pindemonte, Parini, the histories of Botta, the Corbaccio and Fiammetta of Boccaccio, &c. Since I left Rome I have continued my studies; have read the Promessi Sposi by Manzoni,—the finest romance I have ever read,—the Rime of Petrarch, Ariosto, all of Mac
uietly carried it away! The astonished farmer followed him to the convent, and required the return of his corn. His faith was not great enough to see a miracle. It was given up; but the story coming to the ears of the governor of the town, he summarily ordered the restoration of the corn to the convent. I have amused myself not a little in examining the library here. It consists of about a thousand volumes, all in parchment, and in Latin and Italian. There is oneSpanish work, and one German! Our poor language has not a single representative. The monks have looked with astonishment upon the avidity with which I have examined their books; I doubt if they have had such an overhauling for a century. With gloves on, I took down and scanned every book,—a large portion of them I found standing bottom upwards; and as I put them in their places properly (having had some experience in dealing with a library), I think the monks may be gainers by my visit. The librarian told me there
George Sumner (search for this): chapter 14
ess. Professor Greene, now living on an ancestral farm at East Greenwich, R. I., became also an intimate friend of George Sumner. His writings have related not only to Italian literature, but also to American history and biography of the period sts of the monks. His friend recalls that one evening, while they were gazing on the moonlit waters of the Alban Lake, Sumner suddenly exclaimed, as the thought of his deserted law-office came to his mind: Let me see if I can draw a writ! Here, aile the two friends were walking one day in the woods near the convent, and were for a moment separated, it happened that Sumner fell into a wolf-trap; Greene answered at once his call for help, and soon extricated him from his imprisonment. In his argument of Dec. 4, 1849, against the constitutionality of separate colored schools in Massachusetts, Sumner thus referred to this last visit:— In Italy, at the Convent of Palazzuola, on the shores of the Alban Lake, amidst a scene of natura
Henry T. Tuckerman (search for this): chapter 14
fatal disease was upon him. Sumner wrote: The whole visit moved me much. This beautiful genius seems to be drawing to its close. Sumner attended his funeral in New York, on December 5, and was one of the pall-bearers with George W. Greene, H. T. Tuckerman, and Dr. Lieber. of New York; he commenced life humbly, learned something of sculpture in the study of Frazee, where among other things he worked on the heads of Judge Prescott and Judge Story; here he saved a little money and gained a lovee Washington, for which the artist received a commission in 1832, cost him four years of active labor, and was not shipped from Italy till Oct., 1840. The Rescue, designed in 1837, was completed in 1851. Greenough's Essays, with a Memoir by H. T. Tuckerman, were published after his death. Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 247-275. I like infinitely. He is a person of remarkable character every way,—with scholarship such as few of our countrymen have; with a practical knowledge of his art, and
on to you. In Florence I passed one night at Madame Hambet's, in the Piazza Trinita (not the S. Maria Novella, as you said), which cost me three francesconi;then decamped, and am now in the house at the corner of Lunga Arno and the Piazza, with Alfieri's palace near. Greenough Horatio Greenough, 1805-52. He passed most of his life, after leaving college, in Florence. He was a native of Boston, and died in its neighborhood. His chief works are the Chanting Cherubs; The Angel and Child; Venus contending for the Golden Apple; the statue of Washington; and The Rescue. The Washington, for which the artist received a commission in 1832, cost him four years of active labor, and was not shipped from Italy till Oct., 1840. The Rescue, designed in 1837, was completed in 1851. Greenough's Essays, with a Memoir by H. T. Tuckerman, were published after his death. Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 247-275. I like infinitely. He is a person of remarkable character every way,—with scholarsh
Horatio Greenough (search for this): chapter 14
orence, Sumner became much interested in Horatio Greenough, who was then at work on his Washington Capitol. Sumner was greatly impressed with Greenough's intellectual power, as well as his genius idence in his ability. It was the case with Greenough. Cooper saw him, was pleased with him, and up, which was the Chanting Cherubs, and gave Greenough the privilege of exhibiting it in the princiand the Piazza, with Alfieri's palace near. Greenough Horatio Greenough, 1805-52. He passed moh it. I admire the thought and devotion that Greenough has given to his subject, and his determinat1784-1836. the drawing of which, by the way, Greenough has never seen. On the ground is a mother cborn Achilles. The subject was suggested to Greenough by Washington Allston, years ago. The statueness or vulgarity,—without Frazeeism.I asked Greenough if he thought Powers could make a young Auguhat you will take him to Crawford's studio. Greenough has read me some essays of his on art, which[6 more...]
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