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October 5th, 1839 AD (search for this): chapter 14
my heart's content. A little boy asked me the other day if he should not go with me to sing Tasso. The gondoliers are a better set of men than any of the cabmen or hackmen I have had to do with in other places. To Thomas Crawford. Milan, Oct. 5, 1839. dear Crawford,—To-morrow I quit Italy with a beating heart. I love it, and am sad on leaving it. I have taken my place in a malle-poste,to cross the Alps by the Stelvio to Innsbruck. I hope your labors go on well. There will be many of therefore, too sanguine; though you should never lose the confidence of ultimate and distinguished success. I wish to be kept informed of your works; and am, As ever, very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To George W. Greene. Milan, Oct. 5, 1839. my dear Greene,—I was thankful for your letter at Venice, and only regretted that it was not closely written, like these lines that I am now scrawling. I read it again and again, as I plied about with luxurious motion in a gondola. When
American travellers who were likely to invest in works of art. Nor did his zeal in the cause of the young artist end here, as the sequel will show. Crawford, truly grateful for this kindly interest, was anxious to take a bust of Sumner, who consented reluctantly upon Greene's assuring him that he would thereby render a service to his friend. It is the earliest representation of Sumner, and was thought at the time to be faithful to the original. William H. Prescott wrote concerning it, in 1844: It is a very good likeness and a beautiful piece of work, like every thing else from Crawford's chisel. The bust is among the works of art bequeathed by Sumner to the city of Boston, and is now in the Art Museum. Sir Charles Vaughan and John Kenyon, on different occasions, saw it in Greene's library a few months later, and each was so struck with the likeness that he gave Crawford a commission to take a bust of himself. William W. Story writes, of this visit of Sumner to Rome: It was
tral farm at East Greenwich, R. I., became also an intimate friend of George Sumner. His writings have related not only to Italian literature, but also to American history and biography of the period of the Revolution. He was Consul at Rome, 1837-45, afterwards Professor of Modern Languages in Brown University, and later a professor in Cornell University. From Rome he made two excursions,—one to Tivoli, where, with Horace in hand, he observed the scenes commemorated by the poet; and the otmbassador had left for the summer before I came. The Countess of Coventry Lady Coventry was the daughter of Aubrey, sixth Duke of St. Albans, and the wife of George William, eighth Earl of Coventry, and the mother of Lady Holland. She died in 1845. Mr. Milnes (Lord Houghton) gave Sumner a letter of introduction to her. had retired to Albano, where she invited me to visit her: I did not go. Others had fled in different directions. In Florence, the Marquesa Lenzonis Medicis—the last of this
November 29th (search for this): chapter 14
books till five or six in the afternoon, when he sallied out for dinner or a walk. With such devotion, his progress even exceeded his expectations. He read not only Dante, Petrarch, Tasso, Boccaccio, Macchiavelli, Guicciardini, Alfieri, and Niccolini, but several minor authors, whose neglected works are explored only by the most assiduous students of Italian literature. Most of all he enjoyed the great work of an author then living,—the Promessi Sposi of Manzoni. Hillard wrote to him, Nov. 29: You have made an admirable use of your opportunities in Italy. Nobody has ever done more so. The list of books which you have read absolutely startles me. I do not understand how you could have found time for any thing else. Sumner found at Rome, in the Consul of the United States, a scholar of kindred tastes, with whom he established a perpetual friendship. Some will remember that when, in his later years, he was to speak at Faneuil Hall, he brought with him to the platform a slightl
the natural order. My journey was very pleasant,—four days and a half. My companions, a French officer, quite a gentleman and scholar, an Italian artist and a litterateur,—the latter Signor Ottavio Gigli. Gigli lived at Rome, and was well known among Italian scholars. With him I became quite well acquainted. He took me, on his arrival in Florence, to old Abbate Missirini, Canova's biographer. and to the Marquesa Luzaris, and has given me a letter to Giordani. Pietro Giordani, 1774-1848. He began his career as a lawyer; was afterwards a Benedictine monk; and at one time Professor of Eloquence at the University of Bologna. He published, in 1808, a panegyric of Napoleon. I found Gigli quietly engaged in literary pursuits, one of which is so akin to yours that I am anxious you should know him; and he is quite desirous of your acquaintance. He is preparing a Storia Politica of Italy, and has collected from all the principal libraries such manuscripts as will illustrate his su
now, he exclaimed in English: God, what a happy man he must be! I like Capponi much, and regret that I saw so little of him. Of Wilde Richard Henry Wilde, 1789-1847. He represented Georgia in Congress at different times, from 1815 to 1835; was in Europe from 1835 to 1840, residing much of the time in Florence; published a book on The Love, Madness, and Imprisonment of Tasso; undertook a Life of Dante, which he did not live to complete; and became, in 1847, Professor of Common Law in the University of Louisiana. He was fond of literary researches, and his name finds a place among American poets. I have seen very little. I have called upon him and he this great family—invited me to her soirees:I went to one. The Marquis Strozzi called upon me: I had not the grace to return his call. The Count Graberg 1776-1847; a distinguished geographer, at one time Swedish Consul in Tripoli; author of an historical essay on the Scalds and ancient Scandinavian poets. called upon me repe
dard of the convent in this department of knowledge, spoke of England as divided into seven kingdoms,—one of which was Mercia, another Northumberland, &c.; actually going back to the Heptarchy! The English possessions in America were represented as being taken (tolte)from Spain; and of these, Bostona was the capital; but the great commercial place of America was Vera Cruz. When I get home, I will tell you what sort of people monks are. Only a few days ago, I received your kind letter of May 17. I deeply appreciate your sympathy in my father's death. Such a relation cannot be severed without awakening the strongest emotions; and though I cannot affect to feel entirely the grief that others have on such a bereavement, yet it has been to me a source of unfeigned sorrow, and has thrown a shadow across my Italian pleasures. In the education of my young brother and sisters I have always interested myself as much as I was allowed to, from the moment in which I had any education myself
September, 1839 AD (search for this): chapter 14
Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. Leaving Paris April 20, and going by way of Lyons, Sumner embarked at Marseilles, May 3, by steamer for Naples. On the route he visited Genoa, See his description of Genoa, July 4, 1845, in The True Grandeur of Nations: She still sits in queenly pride as she sat then,—her mural crown studded with towers; her churches rich with marble floors and rarest pictures; her palaces of ancient doges and admirals yet spared by the hand of Time; her close streets thronged by a hundred thousand inhabitants,—at the foot of the Apennines as they approach the blue and tideless waters of the Mediterranean Sea, leaning her back against their strong mountain-sides, overshadowed by the foliage of the fig-tree and the olive, while the orange and the lemon with pleasant perfume scent the air where reigns perpetual spring. Who can contemplate such a city without delight?—Works, Vol. I. p. 26. Leghorn, and Pisa, and was kept a day at the unat
statue all that it should be. He is doubtful whether he shall get it finished to his satisfaction within a year from now; and he will not part with it, so long as he can hope to amend it by further labor. The other piece upon which he is engaged for the Capitol is not yet entirely set up; as far as he has gone it is very fine. It is intended to represent the surprise of a white settlement by the Indians. The Rescue. The group reminds me of the Deluge, by Kessels, A Dutch sculptor, 1784-1836. the drawing of which, by the way, Greenough has never seen. On the ground is a mother clasping her child, in order to save it from the uplifted tomahawk of an Indian who stands over her, but whose hand is arrested by a fearless settler, who is represented on a rock so that the upper half of his body appears above the Indian. This subject has capacities of all kinds. The woman is on the ground, so that she does not conceal the Indian, who is naked (except an accidental fold about his loins
hoose to mention it to. He is Mr. Thomas Crawford, Thomas Crawford was born in New York, March 22, 1813, and died in London, Oct. 10, 1857. He visited Italy in 1835, and studied under Thorwaldsen at Rome. Among his chief works are the Orpheus (1840), in the Boston Athenaeum; the colossal equestrian statue of Washington at Ricponi much, and regret that I saw so little of him. Of Wilde Richard Henry Wilde, 1789-1847. He represented Georgia in Congress at different times, from 1815 to 1835; was in Europe from 1835 to 1840, residing much of the time in Florence; published a book on The Love, Madness, and Imprisonment of Tasso; undertook a Life of Dant1835 to 1840, residing much of the time in Florence; published a book on The Love, Madness, and Imprisonment of Tasso; undertook a Life of Dante, which he did not live to complete; and became, in 1847, Professor of Common Law in the University of Louisiana. He was fond of literary researches, and his name finds a place among American poets. I have seen very little. I have called upon him and he upon me; but I have found him at home only once, and he has never found me
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