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May 19th, 1839 AD (search for this): chapter 14
e world by her arms, her jurisprudence, her church,—now sways it further by her arts. Pilgrims from afar, where her eagles, her praetors, her interdicts never reached, become willing subjects of this new empire; and the Vatican, stored with the priceless remains of antiquity and the touching creations of modern art, has succeeded to the Vatican whose thunders intermingled with the strifes of modern Europe. Works, Vol. I. pp. 275-276 Letters. To George S. Hillard. Naples, May 19, 1839. Embarked at Marseilles, May 3, in the steamer Pharamond; touched and passed two days at Genoa, wandered among its palaces and groves of oranges, and enjoyed its paintings. Next stopped at Leghorn long enough to make a most delightful excursion to Pisa, to ascend its leaning tower, and admire its cathedral; then to Civita Vecchia, in which dirty hole we were kept a day, and then to Naples. How can I describe to you, my dear Hillard, the richness of pleasure that I have enjoyed! Here
February 3rd, 1876 AD (search for this): chapter 14
beautiful woman. Powers is a very ingenious man, and has already invented a machine to use instead of compasses in transferring measurements from a cast to the marble on which one is working. This facilitates labor so much, particularly in bas-reliefs, that Greenough told me his men were only twelve days on one piece, when they would have been engaged thirty without Powers's Scorpion. I hope Crawford will get one. Capponi Marquis Gino Capponi was born in Florence in 1792, and died Feb. 3, 1876. He was at one time in public life in Tuscany, but was mainly devoted to literature. A History of the Popes, and a Treatise on Education, are among his works. He persevered in authorship notwithstanding his blindness. He was a correspondent of Mr. Prescott, and is frequently mentioned in the Life of the historian. I saw but once, as he has left town to be absent some six weeks. He inquired kindly after you. He said that he hoped to see Prescott's book translated. When I told him that
Horatio Greenough, 1805-52. He passed most of his life, after leaving college, in Florence. He was a native of Boston, and died in its neighborhood. His chief works are the Chanting Cherubs; The Angel and Child; Venus contending for the Golden Apple; the statue of Washington; and The Rescue. The Washington, for which the artist received a commission in 1832, cost him four years of active labor, and was not shipped from Italy till Oct., 1840. The Rescue, designed in 1837, was completed in 1851. Greenough's Essays, with a Memoir by H. T. Tuckerman, were published after his death. Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 247-275. I like infinitely. He is a person of remarkable character every way,—with scholarship such as few of our countrymen have; with a practical knowledge of his art, and the poetry of it; with an elevated tone of mind that shows itself equally in his views of art, and in all his conversation. I am firmly convinced that he is a superior person to any of the great arti
Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. Leaving Paris April 20, and going by way of Lyons, Sumner embarked at Marseilles, May 3, by steamer for Naples. On the route he visited Genoa, See his description of Genoa, July 4, 1845, in The True Grandeur of Nations: She still sits in queenly pride as she sat then,—her mural crown studded with towers; her churches rich with marble floors and rarest pictures; her palaces of ancient doges and admirals yet spared by the hand of Time;ching creations of modern art, has succeeded to the Vatican whose thunders intermingled with the strifes of modern Europe. Works, Vol. I. pp. 275-276 Letters. To George S. Hillard. Naples, May 19, 1839. Embarked at Marseilles, May 3, in the steamer Pharamond; touched and passed two days at Genoa, wandered among its palaces and groves of oranges, and enjoyed its paintings. Next stopped at Leghorn long enough to make a most delightful excursion to Pisa, to ascend its leaning <
September 11th, 1839 AD (search for this): chapter 14
rself a high rank, and accustom yourself to look with proper contempt on the shallow learning and pettifogging habits (I must use the phrase) which characterize so large a part of the lawyers of America. The omitted part of the letter is chiefly a strong plea for an interest in Crawford. . . .I shall be in Boston in December or January. Let me hear from you there at least, if not before; and believe me, as ever, Most sincerely yours, C. S. To George W. Greene, Rome. Florence, Sept. 11, 1839. dear Greene,—I have thought of you every hour since I left Rome; but have delayed writing till I was on the point of quitting Florence, wishing to give you my final report upon this place. But things in the natural order. My journey was very pleasant,—four days and a half. My companions, a French officer, quite a gentleman and scholar, an Italian artist and a litterateur,—the latter Signor Ottavio Gigli. Gigli lived at Rome, and was well known among Italian scholars. With him I <
at Milan a collection of letters from Botta. He is of our own age, and is amiable and agreeable. He will return to Rome in the course of a few weeks, and I have given him a note of introduction to you. In Florence I passed one night at Madame Hambet's, in the Piazza Trinita (not the S. Maria Novella, as you said), which cost me three francesconi;then decamped, and am now in the house at the corner of Lunga Arno and the Piazza, with Alfieri's palace near. Greenough Horatio Greenough, 1805-52. He passed most of his life, after leaving college, in Florence. He was a native of Boston, and died in its neighborhood. His chief works are the Chanting Cherubs; The Angel and Child; Venus contending for the Golden Apple; the statue of Washington; and The Rescue. The Washington, for which the artist received a commission in 1832, cost him four years of active labor, and was not shipped from Italy till Oct., 1840. The Rescue, designed in 1837, was completed in 1851. Greenough's Essays, w
July 27th, 1839 AD (search for this): chapter 14
eatest interest in him, and wish you and other friends to do something for him. If you cannot order a statue, you can at least write an article. Read my letter to Hillard about him, and then do your best. When you hear from me again,—or, rather, when I hear from you,—I shall be among the Tedeschi lurchi,as Dante calls the children of the Black Forest. Good-by. Success be with you! Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor Simon Greenleaf. Convent of Palazzuola, July 27, 1839. my dear friend,—I wrote you once, I think, from the palace of an English Bishop: this will go to you from a monastery of Franciscans. In Rome, the heat is intense; and the fever-laden airs of the Campagna even enter the city. Here Greene and myself have come to pass a few days,—hermits hoar in solemn cell. An English noble would give a subsidy for such a site as this. In the background is the high mountain which was once dedicated to the Latial Jove, to whom Cicero makes his elo
November 16th, 1839 AD (search for this): chapter 14
calamity; but it was not to be his last! At Florence, Sumner became much interested in Horatio Greenough, who was then at work on his Washington and Rescue, both now placed—the latter a group—at the east front of the National Capitol. Sumner was greatly impressed with Greenough's intellectual power, as well as his genius in his art, and much enjoyed his society. Greenough, answering a letter in which Sumner, after leaving Florence, made some suggestions as to the Washington, wrote, Nov. 16, 1839:— I look upon your advice respecting the accessory ornaments of my chair as having been most well-timed and fortunate for me,—not that I think the figures you object to cannot be rendered poetical as well as effective; but because, as you convincingly observed, I ought, in a first great work, appealing to great national sympathies, to keep clear, quite clear, of debatable ground. Sumner frequented at Florence the studio of Powers, who was then at work upon his Eve. He formed
July 26th, 1839 AD (search for this): chapter 14
y convent,—where I intend to live as I chiefly do here, on fruit, salads, and wine,—I shall go to Florence. But I shall write you from my hermitage, if Nature and the library spare me any time. To George S. Hillard. Convent of Palazzuola, July 26, 1839. dear Hillard,—In my last, dated from Rome, I mentioned that there was an American sculptor there, who needs and deserves more patronage than he has. I wish now to call your particular attention to his case, and through you to interest fort speak to Governor Everett, and Ticknor, and Prescott, in Crawford's behalf? But I will not say more, for you will understand my wishes, and I leave the whole to your discretion. To Henry W. Longfellow, Cambridge. Convent of Palazzuola, July 26, 1839. my dear Longfellow,—FraGreene and myself have already withdrawn from the cares of this life,—the world forgetting, by the world forgot. We have sought quiet in a convent, among cowled, thick-robed, sandalled Franciscans. From our ret
July, 1869 AD (search for this): chapter 14
horwaldsen at Rome. Among his chief works are the Orpheus (1840), in the Boston Athenaeum; the colossal equestrian statue of Washington at Richmond; the colossal statue of Liberty on the dome of the National Capitol; and the designs on the bronze doors of the Capitol, illustrating scenes in the history of the country. Among his statues are the Beethoven in the Music Hall, Boston, and the James Otis in the chapel at Mount Auburn.—Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 306-320; Atlantic Monthly, July, 1869,—Thomas Crawford, A Eulogy, by George S. Hillard, pp. 40-54. Sumner, the day he arrived in Paris, in March, 1857, sought Crawford's lodgings, which he found only after a considerable effort. A fatal disease was upon him. Sumner wrote: The whole visit moved me much. This beautiful genius seems to be drawing to its close. Sumner attended his funeral in New York, on December 5, and was one of the pall-bearers with George W. Greene, H. T. Tuckerman, and Dr. Lieber. of New York; he commenced
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