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March 22nd, 1813 AD (search for this): chapter 14
from my hermitage, if Nature and the library spare me any time. To George S. Hillard. Convent of Palazzuola, July 26, 1839. dear Hillard,—In my last, dated from Rome, I mentioned that there was an American sculptor there, who needs and deserves more patronage than he has. I wish now to call your particular attention to his case, and through you to interest for him such of my friends as you choose to mention it to. He is Mr. Thomas Crawford, Thomas Crawford was born in New York, March 22, 1813, and died in London, Oct. 10, 1857. He visited Italy in 1835, and studied under Thorwaldsen at Rome. Among his chief works are the Orpheus (1840), in the Boston Athenaeum; the colossal equestrian statue of Washington at Richmond; the colossal statue of Liberty on the dome of the National Capitol; and the designs on the bronze doors of the Capitol, illustrating scenes in the history of the country. Among his statues are the Beethoven in the Music Hall, Boston, and the James Otis in the
ing St. John not to address his prayers to him but to God; and is now engaged on a bas-relief for Miss Gibbs, to be put in a church at Newport; also busts of Franklin, of Marquis Capponi, &c. I have seen a good deal of Powers. Hiram Powers, 1805-73. He was born in Vermont; removed to Cincinnati; went to Italy in 1837; exhibited his Eve in 1838; and soon after executed the Greek Slave. Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 276-294. He is very pleasant and agreeable. His busts are truly remarkablinks the writer. On the road I read the Promessi Sposi. It is one of the finest romances, if not the finest, I have ever read in any language. Its homage to truth and virtue I admire. The Pope should remit Manzoni Alessandro Manzoni. 1784-1873. His rank is first among modern Italian writers. His eightieth birthday was celebrated with popular rejoicings, and his death was the occasion of a national tribute to his memory. ten thousand years through purgatory in consideration of Fra Crist
August 4th, 1839 AD (search for this): chapter 14
ldest brother. Remember me to Mrs. Greenleaf, and believe me Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. P. S. Rome, July 28.—I have just received a long letter from my brother George, who has penetrated the interior of Russia, Tartary, Circassia, Bithynia, and is now going to the Holy Land. He has seen more of Russia, I doubt not, than any foreigner alive. He is the most remarkable person of his age I know. Pardon this from a brother. To William F. Frick, Baltimore. Rome, Aug. 4, 1839. my dear Frick, For the letter which Sumner wrote, on sailing for Europe, to his young friend, see ante, Vol. I. pp. 206-209.—Your kind letter, now a year old, gave me great pleasure; and I have been much gratified to hear, from another source, of your being fairly and honorably embarked in your profession. I am half disposed to regret that you did not find it agreeable and convenient to give a year at Cambridge to the quiet study of the books of your profession; but I doubt not t
ife of George William, eighth Earl of Coventry, and the mother of Lady Holland. She died in 1845. Mr. Milnes (Lord Houghton) gave Sumner a letter of introduction to her. had retired to Albano, where she invited me to visit her: I did not go. Others had fled in different directions. In Florence, the Marquesa Lenzonis Medicis—the last of this great family—invited me to her soirees:I went to one. The Marquis Strozzi called upon me: I had not the grace to return his call. The Count Graberg 1776-1847; a distinguished geographer, at one time Swedish Consul in Tripoli; author of an historical essay on the Scalds and ancient Scandinavian poets. called upon me repeatedly: I called upon him once, &c. In Venice, I have letters to some of the first people: I shall not disturb them in my portfolio. With the little time that I have, I cannot embarrass myself with the etiquette of calls and society. The hot months passed quickly in Rome. My habits were simple. Rose at half past 6 o'clock,
gs in the natural order. My journey was very pleasant,—four days and a half. My companions, a French officer, quite a gentleman and scholar, an Italian artist and a litterateur,—the latter Signor Ottavio Gigli. Gigli lived at Rome, and was well known among Italian scholars. With him I became quite well acquainted. He took me, on his arrival in Florence, to old Abbate Missirini, Canova's biographer. and to the Marquesa Luzaris, and has given me a letter to Giordani. Pietro Giordani, 1774-1848. He began his career as a lawyer; was afterwards a Benedictine monk; and at one time Professor of Eloquence at the University of Bologna. He published, in 1808, a panegyric of Napoleon. I found Gigli quietly engaged in literary pursuits, one of which is so akin to yours that I am anxious you should know him; and he is quite desirous of your acquaintance. He is preparing a Storia Politica of Italy, and has collected from all the principal libraries such manuscripts as will illustrate h
October 2nd (search for this): chapter 14
August, and give me the sunshine even at the expense of the heat. He afterwards referred to these days as the happiest of his whole European journey. Thence he went, by way of Siena, to Florence, where he passed a fortnight; and then with a vetturino to Bologna, Ferrara, Rovigo, Padua, and across the plains of Lombardy alone, in a light wagon with a single horse, harnessed with ropes, old leather, and the like. Leaving Venice on the last day of September, after a week's visit, he arrived, Oct. 2, without breaking the journey, at Milan, where his Italian tour ended. Three days later, he took a seat in the malle-poste to cross the Alps by the Stelvio Pass for Innsbruck. Such, in brief, was his route at a period when as yet there was no railway in Italy. His journey, as originally planned, included a visit to Greece, and he was provided with letters of introduction by Dr. Samuel G. Howe, which would have brought him at once into relations with the surviving leaders of the Greek Re
October 10th, 1857 AD (search for this): chapter 14
e library spare me any time. To George S. Hillard. Convent of Palazzuola, July 26, 1839. dear Hillard,—In my last, dated from Rome, I mentioned that there was an American sculptor there, who needs and deserves more patronage than he has. I wish now to call your particular attention to his case, and through you to interest for him such of my friends as you choose to mention it to. He is Mr. Thomas Crawford, Thomas Crawford was born in New York, March 22, 1813, and died in London, Oct. 10, 1857. He visited Italy in 1835, and studied under Thorwaldsen at Rome. Among his chief works are the Orpheus (1840), in the Boston Athenaeum; the colossal equestrian statue of Washington at Richmond; the colossal statue of Liberty on the dome of the National Capitol; and the designs on the bronze doors of the Capitol, illustrating scenes in the history of the country. Among his statues are the Beethoven in the Music Hall, Boston, and the James Otis in the chapel at Mount Auburn.—Tuckerman'
ed for the Capitol is not yet entirely set up; as far as he has gone it is very fine. It is intended to represent the surprise of a white settlement by the Indians. The Rescue. The group reminds me of the Deluge, by Kessels, A Dutch sculptor, 1784-1836. the drawing of which, by the way, Greenough has never seen. On the ground is a mother clasping her child, in order to save it from the uplifted tomahawk of an Indian who stands over her, but whose hand is arrested by a fearless settler, who or sinks the writer. On the road I read the Promessi Sposi. It is one of the finest romances, if not the finest, I have ever read in any language. Its homage to truth and virtue I admire. The Pope should remit Manzoni Alessandro Manzoni. 1784-1873. His rank is first among modern Italian writers. His eightieth birthday was celebrated with popular rejoicings, and his death was the occasion of a national tribute to his memory. ten thousand years through purgatory in consideration of Fra
shallow learning and pettifogging habits (I must use the phrase) which characterize so large a part of the lawyers of America. The omitted part of the letter is chiefly a strong plea for an interest in Crawford. . . .I shall be in Boston in December or January. Let me hear from you there at least, if not before; and believe me, as ever, Most sincerely yours, C. S. To George W. Greene, Rome. Florence, Sept. 11, 1839. dear Greene,—I have thought of you every hour since I left Rome;udying on the road to Vienna; three weeks in Vienna,—a master all the time; then to Prague, Dresden, Berlin, and probably next down to Heidelberg,—an immense sweep; then down the Rhine into Belgium, to London, where I expect to be at the end of December or beginning of January. Venice is a sort of jumping-off place. I am here equally distant from Vienna and Athens. I can be at either in less than seven days. I have ordered my letters to Vienna, where I expect to find a batch of two months. T<
bors was unfeigned; and he hoped that, if ever you came to England, you would take a note from me to him, that he might have the pleasure of making your personal acquaintance. In personal appearance and manners, he is much the gentleman. He has a considerable place near Exeter, where he has built ornamental walls and houses in imitation of some of those old Moorish remains which he so loved in Spain. His article was to appear this June, but I should not be surprised if it went over till October. On the receipt of your letter I wrote him from Rome, to let him know that a large number of corrections had been made in the recent American edition. I also wrote Bentley, whom I saw when in London, communicating your wishes. It is a far cry across the Atlantic Ocean, and not a short one from Rome; but I thought the two together—your Western call and my halloo from the East—would certainly be heard in Burlington Street. In London I met a Spaniard, Gayangos, ante,Vol. II. p. 64. an e
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