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December 4th, 1849 AD (search for this): chapter 14
end recalls that one evening, while they were gazing on the moonlit waters of the Alban Lake, Sumner suddenly exclaimed, as the thought of his deserted law-office came to his mind: Let me see if I can draw a writ! Here, also, while the two friends were walking one day in the woods near the convent, and were for a moment separated, it happened that Sumner fell into a wolf-trap; Greene answered at once his call for help, and soon extricated him from his imprisonment. In his argument of Dec. 4, 1849, against the constitutionality of separate colored schools in Massachusetts, Sumner thus referred to this last visit:— In Italy, at the Convent of Palazzuola, on the shores of the Alban Lake, amidst a scene of natural beauty enhanced by historical association, where I was once a guest, I have for days seen a native of Abyssinia, recently from his torrid home and ignorant of the language spoken about him, mingling in delightful and affectionate familiarity with the Franciscan friars,
been there every month of the year except August, and give me the sunshine even at the expense of the heat. He afterwards referred to these days as the happiest of his whole European journey. Thence he went, by way of Siena, to Florence, where he passed a fortnight; and then with a vetturino to Bologna, Ferrara, Rovigo, Padua, and across the plains of Lombardy alone, in a light wagon with a single horse, harnessed with ropes, old leather, and the like. Leaving Venice on the last day of September, after a week's visit, he arrived, Oct. 2, without breaking the journey, at Milan, where his Italian tour ended. Three days later, he took a seat in the malle-poste to cross the Alps by the Stelvio Pass for Innsbruck. Such, in brief, was his route at a period when as yet there was no railway in Italy. His journey, as originally planned, included a visit to Greece, and he was provided with letters of introduction by Dr. Samuel G. Howe, which would have brought him at once into relation
s. Leaving Naples May 20, and riding during the night, he had the next day his first view of St. Peter's from the Alban hills. That moment a darling vision of childhood and youth was fulfilled. No pilgrim ever entered the Imperial City with a richer enthusiasm,— not even Goethe, who, in his German home, could not, for some time before he crossed the Alps, look at an engraving of Italian scenery or read a Latin book, because of the pang they gave him. Here Sumner remained till the close of August. Rome and the Campagna have attractions at this season which are withheld in winter, and he always regarded the time of his sojourn there as well chosen. Mr. Ticknor wrote to him, Dec. 3, 1839: I agree with you about the season for seeing Italy. I have been there every month of the year except August, and give me the sunshine even at the expense of the heat. He afterwards referred to these days as the happiest of his whole European journey. Thence he went, by way of Siena, to Florence,
l in company with a beautiful woman. Powers is a very ingenious man, and has already invented a machine to use instead of compasses in transferring measurements from a cast to the marble on which one is working. This facilitates labor so much, particularly in bas-reliefs, that Greenough told me his men were only twelve days on one piece, when they would have been engaged thirty without Powers's Scorpion. I hope Crawford will get one. Capponi Marquis Gino Capponi was born in Florence in 1792, and died Feb. 3, 1876. He was at one time in public life in Tuscany, but was mainly devoted to literature. A History of the Popes, and a Treatise on Education, are among his works. He persevered in authorship notwithstanding his blindness. He was a correspondent of Mr. Prescott, and is frequently mentioned in the Life of the historian. I saw but once, as he has left town to be absent some six weeks. He inquired kindly after you. He said that he hoped to see Prescott's book translated. W
there is a young American sculptor here, Mr. Thomas Crawford, who has great merit, and has found considerable favor among artists. Laudatur et alget.Can't something be done for him in Boston? I shall write at length to Hillard or Longfellow about him, and should feel much gratified if you would counsel with them as to the proper way of promoting his interests. C. S. To George S. Hillard. Rome, July 13, 1839. dear Hillard,—I have now before me all your kind, very kind, letters of March 19, April 29, and May 23. In the first you say, I wonder where you are just now, &c. I opened this letter and read it on the Capitoline Hill, with those steps in view over which the friars walked while Gibbon contemplated; the wonderful equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius before me; while thickening about in every direction were the associations of Old Rome. I need not say that your page was more interesting even than that mighty leaf of history then for the first time open before me. Yo
October, 1840 AD (search for this): chapter 14
nd the Piazza, with Alfieri's palace near. Greenough Horatio Greenough, 1805-52. He passed most of his life, after leaving college, in Florence. He was a native of Boston, and died in its neighborhood. His chief works are the Chanting Cherubs; The Angel and Child; Venus contending for the Golden Apple; the statue of Washington; and The Rescue. The Washington, for which the artist received a commission in 1832, cost him four years of active labor, and was not shipped from Italy till Oct., 1840. The Rescue, designed in 1837, was completed in 1851. Greenough's Essays, with a Memoir by H. T. Tuckerman, were published after his death. Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 247-275. I like infinitely. He is a person of remarkable character every way,—with scholarship such as few of our countrymen have; with a practical knowledge of his art, and the poetry of it; with an elevated tone of mind that shows itself equally in his views of art, and in all his conversation. I am firmly convinc
rning and pettifogging habits (I must use the phrase) which characterize so large a part of the lawyers of America. The omitted part of the letter is chiefly a strong plea for an interest in Crawford. . . .I shall be in Boston in December or January. Let me hear from you there at least, if not before; and believe me, as ever, Most sincerely yours, C. S. To George W. Greene, Rome. Florence, Sept. 11, 1839. dear Greene,—I have thought of you every hour since I left Rome; but have dnna; three weeks in Vienna,—a master all the time; then to Prague, Dresden, Berlin, and probably next down to Heidelberg,—an immense sweep; then down the Rhine into Belgium, to London, where I expect to be at the end of December or beginning of January. Venice is a sort of jumping-off place. I am here equally distant from Vienna and Athens. I can be at either in less than seven days. I have ordered my letters to Vienna, where I expect to find a batch of two months. This is a temptation to t<
July 13th, 1839 AD (search for this): chapter 14
S. Let me take the great liberty, in this duplication of postscript, to mention that there is a young American sculptor here, Mr. Thomas Crawford, who has great merit, and has found considerable favor among artists. Laudatur et alget.Can't something be done for him in Boston? I shall write at length to Hillard or Longfellow about him, and should feel much gratified if you would counsel with them as to the proper way of promoting his interests. C. S. To George S. Hillard. Rome, July 13, 1839. dear Hillard,—I have now before me all your kind, very kind, letters of March 19, April 29, and May 23. In the first you say, I wonder where you are just now, &c. I opened this letter and read it on the Capitoline Hill, with those steps in view over which the friars walked while Gibbon contemplated; the wonderful equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius before me; while thickening about in every direction were the associations of Old Rome. I need not say that your page was more intere
otwithstanding his blindness. He was a correspondent of Mr. Prescott, and is frequently mentioned in the Life of the historian. I saw but once, as he has left town to be absent some six weeks. He inquired kindly after you. He said that he hoped to see Prescott's book translated. When I told him that Prescott used his eyes considerably now, he exclaimed in English: God, what a happy man he must be! I like Capponi much, and regret that I saw so little of him. Of Wilde Richard Henry Wilde, 1789-1847. He represented Georgia in Congress at different times, from 1815 to 1835; was in Europe from 1835 to 1840, residing much of the time in Florence; published a book on The Love, Madness, and Imprisonment of Tasso; undertook a Life of Dante, which he did not live to complete; and became, in 1847, Professor of Common Law in the University of Louisiana. He was fond of literary researches, and his name finds a place among American poets. I have seen very little. I have called upon him and
March, 1857 AD (search for this): chapter 14
an statue of Washington at Richmond; the colossal statue of Liberty on the dome of the National Capitol; and the designs on the bronze doors of the Capitol, illustrating scenes in the history of the country. Among his statues are the Beethoven in the Music Hall, Boston, and the James Otis in the chapel at Mount Auburn.—Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 306-320; Atlantic Monthly, July, 1869,—Thomas Crawford, A Eulogy, by George S. Hillard, pp. 40-54. Sumner, the day he arrived in Paris, in March, 1857, sought Crawford's lodgings, which he found only after a considerable effort. A fatal disease was upon him. Sumner wrote: The whole visit moved me much. This beautiful genius seems to be drawing to its close. Sumner attended his funeral in New York, on December 5, and was one of the pall-bearers with George W. Greene, H. T. Tuckerman, and Dr. Lieber. of New York; he commenced life humbly, learned something of sculpture in the study of Frazee, where among other things he worked on the
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