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ido of Guarini; and much of Monti, of Pindemonte, Parini, the histories of Botta, the Corbaccio and Fiammetta of Boccaccio, &c. Since I left Rome I have continued my studies; have read the Promessi Sposi by Manzoni,—the finest romance I have ever read,—the Rime of Petrarch, Ariosto, all of Macchiavelli—except his tract on the art of war—embracing his Discorsi, his Storia, his comedies; the Storia of Guicciardini, the tragedies and Rime of Manzoni, the principal plays of Niccolini, Nota, and Goldoni, Lettere di Jacopo Ortis, &c., of Ugo Foscolo, the autobiography of Alfieri, and a great deal else that I cannot now call to mind, particularly of the lyrics, in which Italian literature so abounds. I now find myself in the midst of some of the most remarkable works of our age, and those too of our own profession. I mean those of Romagnosi; his introduction to the Diritto Publico, is a specimen of masterly analysis, and strength of conception; his Genesi del Diritto Penale is the most re
James Otis (search for this): chapter 14
ork, March 22, 1813, and died in London, Oct. 10, 1857. He visited Italy in 1835, and studied under Thorwaldsen at Rome. Among his chief works are the Orpheus (1840), in the Boston Athenaeum; the colossal equestrian statue of Washington at Richmond; the colossal statue of Liberty on the dome of the National Capitol; and the designs on the bronze doors of the Capitol, illustrating scenes in the history of the country. Among his statues are the Beethoven in the Music Hall, Boston, and the James Otis in the chapel at Mount Auburn.—Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 306-320; Atlantic Monthly, July, 1869,—Thomas Crawford, A Eulogy, by George S. Hillard, pp. 40-54. Sumner, the day he arrived in Paris, in March, 1857, sought Crawford's lodgings, which he found only after a considerable effort. A fatal disease was upon him. Sumner wrote: The whole visit moved me much. This beautiful genius seems to be drawing to its close. Sumner attended his funeral in New York, on December 5, and was one
Gino Capponi (search for this): chapter 14
im, you may do it freely, and be assured that he will be not a little gratified. I hope to see Capponi at Florence, through the kindness of our friend Greene, who has been reading your history with d himself to a subject, part of which falls within your work. If I should learn any thing from Capponi which I should deem interesting to you, I shall take the liberty of communicating it. From Ital they would have been engaged thirty without Powers's Scorpion. I hope Crawford will get one. Capponi Marquis Gino Capponi was born in Florence in 1792, and died Feb. 3, 1876. He was at one timMarquis Gino Capponi was born in Florence in 1792, and died Feb. 3, 1876. He was at one time in public life in Tuscany, but was mainly devoted to literature. A History of the Popes, and a Treatise on Education, are among his works. He persevered in authorship notwithstanding his blindnessd his eyes considerably now, he exclaimed in English: God, what a happy man he must be! I like Capponi much, and regret that I saw so little of him. Of Wilde Richard Henry Wilde, 1789-1847. He r
n exceeded his expectations. He read not only Dante, Petrarch, Tasso, Boccaccio, Macchiavelli, Guieorgia,—then pursuing researches for a Life of Dante, on which he was engaged. At Wilde's request,and afterwards at Venice others connected with Dante. In Florence, he met a tourist from Boston, a affectionately yours, C. S. P. S. Ah, my Dante! how I have thrilled under his stern and beaum you,—I shall be among the Tedeschi lurchi,as Dante calls the children of the Black Forest. Good-and Imprisonment of Tasso; undertook a Life of Dante, which he did not live to complete; and becamety on my part. Wilde is busy with the Life of Dante. Have you seen Vol. I. of the Reports of the that I was able to keep in the house. I read Dante, Tasso's Gerusalemme, the Decameron of Boccaccoscope. Petrarch is always delicious. I read Dante with great attention, using four different ediifying that minimum—was to read the Inferno of Dante! I wish I were in Rome now, to talk with Mrs.[2 more...
Thomas Coventry (search for this): chapter 14
er of introduction. In Rome, the Princess Borghese died two days after my arrival; the French Ambassador had left for the summer before I came. The Countess of Coventry Lady Coventry was the daughter of Aubrey, sixth Duke of St. Albans, and the wife of George William, eighth Earl of Coventry, and the mother of Lady Holland. Lady Coventry was the daughter of Aubrey, sixth Duke of St. Albans, and the wife of George William, eighth Earl of Coventry, and the mother of Lady Holland. She died in 1845. Mr. Milnes (Lord Houghton) gave Sumner a letter of introduction to her. had retired to Albano, where she invited me to visit her: I did not go. Others had fled in different directions. In Florence, the Marquesa Lenzonis Medicis—the last of this great family—invited me to her soirees:I went to one. The Marquis StCoventry, and the mother of Lady Holland. She died in 1845. Mr. Milnes (Lord Houghton) gave Sumner a letter of introduction to her. had retired to Albano, where she invited me to visit her: I did not go. Others had fled in different directions. In Florence, the Marquesa Lenzonis Medicis—the last of this great family—invited me to her soirees:I went to one. The Marquis Strozzi called upon me: I had not the grace to return his call. The Count Graberg 1776-1847; a distinguished geographer, at one time Swedish Consul in Tripoli; author of an historical essay on the Scalds and ancient Scandinavian poets. called upon me repeatedly: I called upon him once, &c. In Venice, I have letters to some of t
Believe me ever, my dear sir, very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. P. S. Do you remember, in the Sala di Torre Borgia, at the Vatican, painted by Raphael, a portrait of your hero, Ferdinand the Catholic? It is one of the caryatides that supports the Battle of the Saracens; and under it is inscribed, Christiani Imperii Propagator.Other caryatides are Charlemagne and Lothaire. You will find some mention of this in De Quincy's Histoire de la vie et des ouvrages de Raphael, p. 176; Bohn's ed., p. 298. though Lanzi makes no mention of it; nor Vasari, I think. P. S. Let me take the great liberty, in this duplication of postscript, to mention that there is a young American sculptor here, Mr. Thomas Crawford, who has great merit, and has found considerable favor among artists. Laudatur et alget.Can't something be done for him in Boston? I shall write at length to Hillard or Longfellow about him, and should feel much gratified if you would counsel with them as to the proper
Marcus Aurelius (search for this): chapter 14
uch gratified if you would counsel with them as to the proper way of promoting his interests. C. S. To George S. Hillard. Rome, July 13, 1839. dear Hillard,—I have now before me all your kind, very kind, letters of March 19, April 29, and May 23. In the first you say, I wonder where you are just now, &c. I opened this letter and read it on the Capitoline Hill, with those steps in view over which the friars walked while Gibbon contemplated; the wonderful equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius before me; while thickening about in every direction were the associations of Old Rome. I need not say that your page was more interesting even than that mighty leaf of history then for the first time open before me. Your other letters have repeated to me what I first heard from my own family,—the death of my father; an event which has caused me many painful emotions,—not the less painful because beyond the reach of ordinary sympathy. To you, who so well understand my situation, I nee<
George S. Hillard (search for this): chapter 14
hen living,—the Promessi Sposi of Manzoni. Hillard wrote to him, Nov. 29: You have made an admir I. pp. 275-276 Letters. To George S. Hillard. Naples, May 19, 1839. Embarked at Mo Naples. How can I describe to you, my dear Hillard, the richness of pleasure that I have enjoyedrgh. I have forgotten his name and address. Hillard, however, has both. He would be pleased to for him in Boston? I shall write at length to Hillard or Longfellow about him, and should feel muchrge S. Hillard. Rome, July 13, 1839. dear Hillard,—I have now before me all your kind, very kinuly, 1869,—Thomas Crawford, A Eulogy, by George S. Hillard, pp. 40-54. Sumner, the day he arrived ite to a work so much time. I have written to Hillard about an American sculptor at Rome,—Mr. Thomaat least write an article. Read my letter to Hillard about him, and then do your best. When you hogna, and five or seven at Venice. To George S. Hillard. Palazzo Giustiniani, Venice, Sept. 29,[5 more.
ng researches for a Life of Dante, on which he was engaged. At Wilde's request, he traced out at Ferrara some manuscripts of Tasso, and afterwards at Venice others connected with Dante. In Florence, he met a tourist from Boston, already known to him, and younger than himself,—William Minot, Jr.,—in whom he took much interest, inspired in part by an ancient friendship which had existed between their fathers. Young Minot wrote to him from Florence, Sept. 26, 1839:— I consider, my dear Mentor, my having met you at my entrance into Italy as a great piece of fortune. You have set me at once on the right track, have stimulated all my motives and tastes, and have made the path of improvement and pleasure clear to me. I shall bind up our conferences with my bundle of associations in Italy, mark them number one, and lay them in a very handy corner of my brain. Mr. Minot, now a member of the Boston bar, writes:— While in Italy, he devoted himself with great zeal to the study
Morgan Lewis (search for this): chapter 14
lfieri; visited every thing; did not present a single letter of introduction; paid dear for my lodgings; left in the malle-postefor Milan; rode two nights and a day; read Italian, and talked that and French. In Milan I have stumbled upon a couple of friends, to whom I wish you to be kind, for various reasons,—inasmuch as they are my friends, and are quiet, pleasant, gentlemanly persons; and you will be pleased with them. One is Preston, of Virginia,—the brother of the Senator; the other is Lewis, of Connecticut. The latter spoke French before he left America. Both are desirous of acquiring Italian, but I fear will not have the energy to deal with it properly. I wish you would encourage them, and give them such assistance as you can. Within a week or fortnight, Sir Charles Vaughan will be in Rome. For twelve years, he was the much respected I may say, loved—Minister of England at Washington. All Americans owe him kindness and attention for the way in which he speaks about our co<
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