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January 1st (search for this): chapter 2
u sent me has been out of my hands so much since I received it, that I have only found time to glance at it. It is very finely executed, and reads admirably. I still hold to the high opinion I have always expressed with regard to it, and to the highest expectations for your fame. I have authorized the publisher to omit on the title-page the phrase, for the use of colleges and schools; that limits the object of the book too much. I hope you will believe that I have done my best for you. On Jan. 1 I leave England for Germany. . . . How are politics? You have been in Boston among my friends: what say you now to my trip to Europe? Shall I be injured by it? Give me one of your long, closely-written letters. Ever yours, Charles Sumner. P. S. One of my friends, Joseph Parkes, has bought and is reading a copy of your book. I will give a copy to the editors of the Spectator and Globe. To Mrs. Judge Howe, Cambridge. ATHENAeUM Club, The Athenaeum Club (Pall Mall) was founded
Marryat says that when Willis looked over his spoon, one spoon looked over another. Lady Blessington says it is all false, as also does Fonblanque, who was at the dinner. I have seen Disraeli. . . . Captain Marryat has returned full of blood and fury. He will probably write a book; if he does, he will show us no mercy. He says there is nobody in Congress worth any thing but Webster and Adams. Miss Martineau is diligently engaged on her novel, Dee<*>orook. which will be published in February or March. She has been exerting herself very much, and seems confident of no ordinary success. If she succeeds, she intends to follow it up by others. I left off my sketch at Milton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the church service is chanted. In the afternoon I read some of the manuscripts of Burke; after dinner, there were about thirty musicians who came from Peterborough, and in the hall alternately pl
ham this evening. The Attorney-General asked me, a few days ago, for some American references that would bear upon the case of Stockdale v. Hansard, This controversy is described at length in Life of Lord Denman, Vol. II. pp. 36-62, 228-231. It disturbed permanently the relations of the Chief-Justice (Denman) and the Attorney-General (Campbell). The case is reported in Adolphus and Ellis's Reports, Vol. IX. pp. 1-243 (argued April 23, 24, and 25, and May 28, 1839, and opinions given May 31); and Vol. XI. pp. 253-300 (heard Jan. 11 and 27, 1840). Sumner referred to it in his speech of June 15, 1860, on the imprisonment of Thaddeus Hyatt, under an order of the Senate. Works, Vol. IV. p. 439. wherein the question arises whether the House of Commons could privilege a libellous publication. I have written him in reply, stating that no such question had yet risen among us; but that the matter of contempts had been discussed repeatedly in the United States, and have referred him
art, as I freely mention their names, like water. He has just published a charming little book, entitled, Essays and Selections; and he has given me a copy, in which he has written my name, with the affectionate good wishes of Basil Montagu. I have been amused at what was told me to-night with regard to my admission to the Athenaeum. I am an Honorary Member, admitted as a foreigner of distinction, a title which it made me shrink to see applied to my name. But it seems I was nominated last July, and rejected, as was said, by the vote of Croker, whereat Milman was in great anger. Croker's objection was that I was not known as the author of any book! Everybody is laughing at Willis's sketch, in a late New York Mirror, of Lord Durham. Marryat says that when Willis looked over his spoon, one spoon looked over another. Lady Blessington says it is all false, as also does Fonblanque, who was at the dinner. I have seen Disraeli. . . . Captain Marryat has returned full of blood and fur
September (search for this): chapter 2
Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. Letters To George S. Hillard, Boston. London, Nov. 4, 1838. my dear Hillard,—I do not delay one moment to acknowledge the receipt of your touching letter, communicating the intelligence of the death of your dear child. Hillard's only child, a boy of two years, died after a brief illness the previous September. Would that these lines could go to you as swiftly as my sympathy! I sorrow with you from the bottom of my heart, and I fear that the lightsome letters which I have written latterly, all unconscious of your bereavement, may have seemed to flout your grief. I have been rejoicing while you have been sad; I have been passing, with joy lighting my steps, from one pleasant abode to another, while you have been sitting still in the house of mourning. Would that I could have shaken to you some of the superflux of happiness which has been my lot, and recei
December 5th (search for this): chapter 2
n generally very agreeable and accomplished men; but there is too much of them: they take up too much of our time. This was delivered with the greatest gentleness. . . . Bulwer was here a few moments ago in his flash falsetto dress, with high-heel boots, a white great coat, and a flaming blue cravat. How different from Rogers who is sitting near me, reading the North American; or Hallam who is lolling in an easy chair; or Milman,—both absorbed in some of the last Reviews or Magazines. December 5. To-night my invitations were to dinner at Brougham's, Sir Robert Inglis's, Mr. Justice Littledale's, and Mr. Kenyon's; at the latter place to meet Rogers and Southey. I dined with Brougham, as his invitation came first, and hoped to be able to drop in at Inglis's and Kenyon's; but we sat so late at table that I could only reach Inglis's, and then get home at midnight, trusting to some future opportunity of meeting Southey and Rogers: the last, of course, I may see every day. To-morrow
December 8th (search for this): chapter 2
hancery barrister. At Coltman's at dinner, I saw young Wortley hand down Lady Coltman, though there were at table Baron Parke, Vaughan, and Sir Edward Curry. This was strictly correct according to the Heralds' books, as the son of a peer takes precedence of knights, whatever may be their respective ages; but it shocked my notions of propriety. Dec. 14, 1838. Poor Allan Park is dead; and everybody is speculating about his successor. The Solicitor-General will be the man. Park died Dec. 8. Thomas Erskine (not Rolfe) was appointed, Jan. 9, 1839, his successor. Rolfe was appointed a baron of the Exchequer in Nov., 1839. Post, p. 52. I dined last night with Serjeant Wilde, and it was amusing to see the coquetry between him, Talfourd, Bompas, and Hill, with regard to the successor. I came up yesterday from Oxford, where I have passed four delightful days. I was installed by Sir Charles Vaughan as an honorary Fellow of All Souls. I have now given you the Queen's Bench and t
December 10th (search for this): chapter 2
imperious notes of Great Tom, to the softer strains of Magdalen and Merton,— Answering temples with obedient sound Peal to the night, and moan sad music round. But your own imagination will supply you with the natural emotions incident to this place. While here I have seen most of the heads of houses and the tutors, and have derived much knowledge with regard to the system of study and the points of police. The warden of Merton College, and Lady Carmichael, invited him for dinner on Dec. 10. Some of the tutors have been so kind as to write out abstracts of the studies, and particularly of the system of examination for degrees: I hope I may be able to do some good with this information on my return. The minutes of the expenses I have been furnished with; and I have established relations here which will enable me at any time to command any information on the subject, which our friends may desire. I have been charmed to find that there is a bona fide system of examination for d
December 13th (search for this): chapter 2
ting that it is a work in which I have great confidence, and that I should be well pleased to see it reviewed in the Edinburgh. I will do the same with Hayward, who writes the juridical articles in the Quarterly, besides editing the Law Magazine, and whom I know intimately. Perhaps I will send a copy to Lockhart, whom I have met several times. I will dispose of several other copies in the same manner,—one to a leading writer in the London and Foreign Review. In a letter to Dr. Lieber, Dec. 13, Sumner, writing of reviews of the Political Ethics which he hoped to obtain, refers to John Stuart Mill as the most accomplished critic in that department in England. The copy which you sent me has been out of my hands so much since I received it, that I have only found time to glance at it. It is very finely executed, and reads admirably. I still hold to the high opinion I have always expressed with regard to it, and to the highest expectations for your fame. I have authorized the publi
December 25th (search for this): chapter 2
nts for the publication of both volumes of your work,—Mr. William Smith, of Fleet Street, an intelligent, gentlemanly person of about thirty-five years, whose appearance I like very much, more than that of Colburn or Longman. It will appear at Christmas (an edition of five hundred copies) in very good style. . . . On the publication of the English edition I will send a copy to Mr. Empson, the successor of Sir James Mackintosh as Professor of Law, whom I know, and who writes the juridical articich will be published in February or March. She has been exerting herself very much, and seems confident of no ordinary success. If she succeeds, she intends to follow it up by others. I left off my sketch at Milton without giving you my Christmas Day. In the forenoon, Whewell and I went to the Minster at Peterborough, where the church service is chanted. In the afternoon I read some of the manuscripts of Burke; after dinner, there were about thirty musicians who came from Peterborough,
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