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erjeant Wilde is said to exercise a very great influence over him; indeed, scandal attributes to him some of the power behind the throne greater than the throne. Upon Tindal devolves the decision of all interlocutory matters in his court,—the other judges seldom interposing with regard to them, or, indeed, appearing to interest themselves about them. He is one of the kindest men that ever lived. Next to Tindal is old James Allan Park, 1763-1838. He was born in Edinburgh; published, in 1787, a work on The Law of Marine Insurance; was elected Recorder of Durham in 1802; and was a Judge of the Common Pleas, 1816-1838. the oldest judge on the bench, and who, it is reported, is now at the point of death. He has been some fifty-eight years at the bar and on the bench; is a staunch Tory, and a believer in the divinity of wigs. He dislikes Campbell, the Attorney-General; interrupts counsel very much, and has some of the petulance of age. There are a thousand amusing stories about him,
hern Circuit; and, in 1842, became Recorder of Doncaster. He wrote upon the Poor Laws. He accompanied Sumner to Oxford; arranged for his visit to the Thames Tunnel; and invited him to breakfast at 32 Upper Harley Street. Sir Francis Palgrave, 1788-1861. He wrote several books upon English history and antiquities, and was Deputy Keeper of her Majesty's Public Records. Serjeant Talfourd, and Lockhart; next with the Lord Mayor at Guildhall; next passed the day at Windsor Castle, the guest of refix, as Sumner; and I, of course, do the same with them. Sir William Follett always meets me on that footing. It was only night before last that I dined at his house. We had at table Sir Frederick Pollock, Serjeant Talfourd, Theodore Hook, 1788-1844. Charles Austin,—one of the cleverest, most enlightened, and agreeable men in London,—and Crowder, the Queen's counsel. Talfourd Thomas Noon Talfourd, 1795-1854. He entered Parliament in 1835, and the same year gave to the public his tra
meet Rogers and Southey. I dined with Brougham, as his invitation came first, and hoped to be able to drop in at Inglis's and Kenyon's; but we sat so late at table that I could only reach Inglis's, and then get home at midnight, trusting to some future opportunity of meeting Southey and Rogers: the last, of course, I may see every day. To-morrow, I dine with the Political Economy Club, where I shall meet Senior, John Mill, John Stuart Mill, 1806-1873. McCulloch, John Ramsay McCulloch, 1789-1864; author of the Dictionary of Commerce and Commercial Navigation. Spring Rice, Lord Lansdowne, &c. On the next day I commence my pilgrimage to Oxford, where I pass four days, and those four are engaged: first, to Sir Charles Vaughan, at All Souls; second, to my friend Ingham, M. P., at Oriel; third, to Dr. Hampden, at Christ Church; fourth, to Wortley, at Merton. I then go to Cambridge, where my first day is engaged to Whewell, &c. A few days ago I received a most friendly and affection
at the same time: Well, you are not tattooed, really! Hallam is a plain, frank man, but is said to be occasionally quite testy and restless. Charles Babbage, 1790-1871; the mathematician. himself one of the most petulant men that ever lived, told me that Hallam once lay awake all night till four o'clock in the morning, hearido him the justice to add that I once dined in company with him at Cresswell's, when he continued awake during all the time. Coleridge John Taylor Coleridge, 1790-1876; nephew of the poet, Samuel T. He distanced his rivals at Oxford, winning the Chancellor's prizes for both the English and Latin essays. He achieved early sugraduate; next day dined in hall with the Fellows of Caius; By the invitation of A. Thurtell. breakfasted with Whewell, Henslow, and Peacock. George Peacock, 1790-1858; Professor of Mathematics. So you will see I met all kinds and degrees of persons, and saw every variety of social entertainment. Oxford is more striking as
t: It's not four o'clock; it wants five minutes of it! and, after this volley, at once fell asleep. At the same dinner last week, I met Hallam, Whewell, Babbage, Lyell, Sir Charles Lyell, 1797-1875. Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey Murchison, 1792-1871. Dr. Buckland, Sedgwick, Rev. Adam Sedgwick, 1785—. and one or two M. P. s. Hallam talked about Prescott's book, and praised it very much. He said that Lord Holland was in ecstasy about it; and that he was the most competent judge of it inow engaged upon a work on Woman, which will be published in the spring. Woman and her Master,—published in 1840. I have told you of one dinner with the Radicals; another was at Joseph Parkes's, where we had Dr. Bowring Sir John Bowring, 1792-1872; scholar, philologist, and writer upon political and commercial questions; the first editor of the Westminster Review, and the friend and literary executor of Jeremy Bentham. He served in Parliament, 1835-1849; was Governor of Hong Kong, 185
788-1844. Charles Austin,—one of the cleverest, most enlightened, and agreeable men in London,—and Crowder, the Queen's counsel. Talfourd Thomas Noon Talfourd, 1795-1854. He entered Parliament in 1835, and the same year gave to the public his tragedy of Ion. His Athenian Captive followed in 1838. His Copyright Act distinguihe simple roof of the poetess, that he did not know the residence of the greatest ornament of his town! Another morning was devoted to Carlyle. Thomas Carlyle, 1795—.He had, prior to 1839, published besides miscellaneous papers the Sartor Resartus, and French Revolution. His Burns had been read with great interest by Sumner wd instructive, —during which I saw most of the persons eminent at the university, and visited the various colleges. Dined with Whewell, William Whewell, D. D., 1795-1866; master of Trinity College, and author of scientific works. and met a large company; next day dined in hall at Trinity, and then repaired to the Combination
lived, told me that Hallam once lay awake all night till four o'clock in the morning, hearing the chimes and the watchman's hourly annunciation of them. When he heard the cry, Four o'clock, and a cloudy morning, he leaped from his bed, threw open his window, and, hailing the terrified watchman, cried out: It's not four o'clock; it wants five minutes of it! and, after this volley, at once fell asleep. At the same dinner last week, I met Hallam, Whewell, Babbage, Lyell, Sir Charles Lyell, 1797-1875. Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey Murchison, 1792-1871. Dr. Buckland, Sedgwick, Rev. Adam Sedgwick, 1785—. and one or two M. P. s. Hallam talked about Prescott's book, and praised it very much. He said that Lord Holland was in ecstasy about it; and that he was the most competent judge of it in England. Mr. Mountstuart Elphinstone 1779-1859; noted for his official service in India, and his descriptive and historical writings upon that country.—one of the most remarkable men in Engla
it; and both he and Poole entertained me by their reminiscences of Godwin. While I listened late at night to these reminiscences, I did not expect the next evening to be sitting on the same sofa chatting with Godwin's daughter, Mrs. Shelley, 1798-1851. She invited Sumner to tea, at her house in Park Street. the author of Frankenstein. I dined with Theobald, William Theobald, author of The Law of Principal and Surety. whose legal writings you well know, and, stealing away from his drawiChanning's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passed a very pleasant evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to abolish capital executions for minor offences, and was active in the Temperance reform. He was an
recently been called to the bar: I think him a young man full of promise. Vaughan, though not a man of book-learning himself, respects it in others. I once sat with him in chambers in a matter where one of the young Chittys appeared; at first the judge inclined against the barrister and his authorities, but he said in a way that I saw gave no little pleasure, Mr. Chitty, I have a great respect for your opinion. Bosanquet John Bernard Bosanquet, 1773-1847. He was called to the bar in 1800, and associated as reporter with Sir Christopher Puller; was Counsel of the East India Company, and of the Bank of England; became a judge of the Common Pleas in 1830, resigning in 1842. you well know as a reporter. As a judge he seems dry and reserved, sitting on the extreme left, and apparently taking so little interest in the causes, that his qualities as a judge seem to be all negative. You do not hear him talked of by the bar, nor meet him in society. Lord Denman told me that he went h
dal attributes to him some of the power behind the throne greater than the throne. Upon Tindal devolves the decision of all interlocutory matters in his court,—the other judges seldom interposing with regard to them, or, indeed, appearing to interest themselves about them. He is one of the kindest men that ever lived. Next to Tindal is old James Allan Park, 1763-1838. He was born in Edinburgh; published, in 1787, a work on The Law of Marine Insurance; was elected Recorder of Durham in 1802; and was a Judge of the Common Pleas, 1816-1838. the oldest judge on the bench, and who, it is reported, is now at the point of death. He has been some fifty-eight years at the bar and on the bench; is a staunch Tory, and a believer in the divinity of wigs. He dislikes Campbell, the Attorney-General; interrupts counsel very much, and has some of the petulance of age. There are a thousand amusing stories about him, which the lawyers tell at dinner to illustrate his rather puritanical characte
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