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sion. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to abolish capital executions for minor offences, and was active in the Temperance reform. He was an enthusiastic student of Bacon, editing the works, and writing the life of the philosopher. His edition was the text of Macaulay's famous article in the Edinburgh Review. His daughter married Bryan Waller Procter, who, as an author, adopted the pseudonym of Barry Cornwall, and died in 1874, at the age of eighty-seven. Adelaide Anne Procter, 1825-1864, was Mr. Procter's daughter. Sumner made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They were charmed with him, and ever after regarded him with a tenderness like that of parents. Mrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminence. His relations to them and to the Procters have been touched upon by James T. Fields, in a paper contributed to Harper's Magazine, Nov., 1875, pp. 777-796; and afterwards reprinted in a volume entitled Barry Cornwall and some of his Fri
own as Mr. Coke. After four days at Holkham, where were Lords Spencer and Ebrington, Lord Ebrington, second Earl of Fortescue, 1783-1861. He was M. P. for North Devon in 1838. He moved, in 1831, the address of confidence in Lord Grey's administration; was Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland from April, 1839, to September, 1841. Sumner received kindly attentions from him during his visit to England in 1857. Edward Ellice, 1786-1863. He represented Coventry in Parliament from 1818 (except from 1826 to 1830) until his death; was, in 1830, joint Secretary of the Treasury, and the Whip of the Whigs in the House of Commons; and Secretary of War for a short time in Lord Melbourne's ministry. His first wife was the sister of Earl Grey, and his second the widow of the Earl of Leicester. He was much interested in French affairs, and was the partisan of Thiers. Greville Memoirs, Chap. XXXII., Jan. 19, 1837. Sumner met him on his visit to England in 1857. &c., got into the mail which drives
isit to England in 1857. Edward Ellice, 1786-1863. He represented Coventry in Parliament from 1818 (except from 1826 to 1830) until his death; was, in 1830, joint Secretary of the Treasury, and the Whip of the Whigs in the House of Commons; and Se1830, joint Secretary of the Treasury, and the Whip of the Whigs in the House of Commons; and Secretary of War for a short time in Lord Melbourne's ministry. His first wife was the sister of Earl Grey, and his second the widow of the Earl of Leicester. He was much interested in French affairs, and was the partisan of Thiers. Greville Memoirsstudied at Cambridge; entered Parliament in 1818; was counsel with Brougham for Queen Caroline; became Attorney-General in 1830, and Lord Chief-Justice of the Queen's Bench in 1832; was created a peer, in 1834, with the title of Baron Denman. He resristopher Puller; was Counsel of the East India Company, and of the Bank of England; became a judge of the Common Pleas in 1830, resigning in 1842. you well know as a reporter. As a judge he seems dry and reserved, sitting on the extreme left, and a
to make glad the stomachs of the fathers of the town. From Boston went to Lynn, an ancient and commercial place of about fourteen thousand inhabitants, passing over the spot where King John lost his baggage, and over the Wash. . . . Arrived at Holkham, the superb seat of Lord Leicester, better known as Mr. Coke. After four days at Holkham, where were Lords Spencer and Ebrington, Lord Ebrington, second Earl of Fortescue, 1783-1861. He was M. P. for North Devon in 1838. He moved, in 1831, the address of confidence in Lord Grey's administration; was Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland from April, 1839, to September, 1841. Sumner received kindly attentions from him during his visit to England in 1857. Edward Ellice, 1786-1863. He represented Coventry in Parliament from 1818 (except from 1826 to 1830) until his death; was, in 1830, joint Secretary of the Treasury, and the Whip of the Whigs in the House of Commons; and Secretary of War for a short time in Lord Melbourne's ministry. H
ioned seat,—which may with propriety be called the bench, in contradistinction to the chair, which is the seat of a professor. I shall begin with the common law, and, of course, with the Queen's Bench. You know Lord Denman Thomas Denman, 1779-1854, ante, Vol. I. p. 330. He was taught as a child by Mrs. Barbauld; studied at Cambridge; entered Parliament in 1818; was counsel with Brougham for Queen Caroline; became Attorney-General in 1830, and Lord Chief-Justice of the Queen's Bench in 1832; was created a peer, in 1834, with the title of Baron Denman. He resigned his office of Chief-Justice in 1850. His love of humanity was a conspicuous feature of his public life. In Parliament he was a determined opponent of slavery and the slave trade. His appointment as Chief-Justice was promoted by Brougham. Life of Lord Denman, Vol. I. p. 318; Brougham's Autobiography, Vol. III. p. 220. He invited Sumner to a dinner at Guildhall, and several times welcomed him at his own house in Po
He was taught as a child by Mrs. Barbauld; studied at Cambridge; entered Parliament in 1818; was counsel with Brougham for Queen Caroline; became Attorney-General in 1830, and Lord Chief-Justice of the Queen's Bench in 1832; was created a peer, in 1834, with the title of Baron Denman. He resigned his office of Chief-Justice in 1850. His love of humanity was a conspicuous feature of his public life. In Parliament he was a determined opponent of slavery and the slave trade. His appointment as was from his youth distinguished for his excellence in classical studies; assisted Brougham and Denman in the defence of Queen Caroline; attacked in Parliament the delay of business in Chancery under Lord Eldon; became a baron of the Exchequer in 1834, and was transferred the same year to the King's Bench. See reference to him in Life of Lord Denman, Vol. I. p. 128; Vol. II. pp. 13, 14, 170, 171.—commonly called Johnny, or Little Johnny Williams—is short in person. He was the ancient associ
cleverest, most enlightened, and agreeable men in London,—and Crowder, the Queen's counsel. Talfourd Thomas Noon Talfourd, 1795-1854. He entered Parliament in 1835, and the same year gave to the public his tragedy of Ion. His Athenian Captive followed in 1838. His Copyright Act distinguishes his Parliamentary career. In 18n political and commercial questions; the first editor of the Westminster Review, and the friend and literary executor of Jeremy Bentham. He served in Parliament, 1835-1849; was Governor of Hong Kong, 1854-57; and became editor of the Westminster Review by the nomination of Bentham, but against the judgment of James Mill. Autobiivals at Oxford, winning the Chancellor's prizes for both the English and Latin essays. He achieved early success at the bar; was a judge of the King's Bench from 1835 until his resignation in 1858; contributed to the Quarterly Review, and edited Blackstone's Commentaries. In his retirement he was active in good works. See refe
August 15th, 1836 AD (search for this): chapter 2
d. He died suddenly of apoplexy, while discharging his official duties. Talfourd invited Sumner to dine, Nov. 24, 1838, at his house, 56 Russell Square. In a note from Gloucester, April 1, 1840, he regrets that absence on the circuit will prevent his shaking Sumner's hand again, but hopes to renew their acquaintance at no very distant period in the United States. They had interchanged friendly letters before Sumner went abroad. Talfourd, Jan. 4, 1837, acknowledging Sumner's letter of Aug. 15, 1836, sent him two copies of Ion,—one for himself, and another for Dr. Channing, your illustrious fellow-citizen, of whose writings I am a fervid admirer. They had also a common friend in Thomas Brown, ante, Vol. I. p. 156. outdid himself; indeed, I have never seen him in such force. He and Pollock discussed the comparative merits of Demosthenes and Cicero; and Talfourd, with the earnestness which belongs to him, repeated one of Cicero's glorious perorations. Pollock gave a long extract f
in poverty. To him, London and its mighty maze of society are nothing; neither he nor his writings are known. Young Milnes Richard Monckton Milnes was born in 1809. He supported liberal measures as a Member of Parliament for Pontefract from 1837 to 1863, when he was raised to the peerage as Baron Houghton. His contributions to literature, in prose and poetry, have been miscellaneous. In 1875 he visited the United States. He is widely known for his genial qualities as host and friend. went his first circuit as judge in company with Bosanquet, who taught his Lordship how to wear his robes, and which of the various robes to assume on certain days. Next is Coltman, Thomas Coltman, 1781-1849; a judge of the Common Pleas from 1837 until his death. Sumner was invited at different times to dine at his house, 6 Hyde Park Gardens. whose appointment astonished everybody, and is said to have been a job of Brougham. He was of the Northern circuit, and a friend of Brougham. He
January 4th, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 2
as made a judge of the Common Pleas, and knighted. He died suddenly of apoplexy, while discharging his official duties. Talfourd invited Sumner to dine, Nov. 24, 1838, at his house, 56 Russell Square. In a note from Gloucester, April 1, 1840, he regrets that absence on the circuit will prevent his shaking Sumner's hand again, but hopes to renew their acquaintance at no very distant period in the United States. They had interchanged friendly letters before Sumner went abroad. Talfourd, Jan. 4, 1837, acknowledging Sumner's letter of Aug. 15, 1836, sent him two copies of Ion,—one for himself, and another for Dr. Channing, your illustrious fellow-citizen, of whose writings I am a fervid admirer. They had also a common friend in Thomas Brown, ante, Vol. I. p. 156. outdid himself; indeed, I have never seen him in such force. He and Pollock discussed the comparative merits of Demosthenes and Cicero; and Talfourd, with the earnestness which belongs to him, repeated one of Cicero's glori
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