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Shakspeare (search for this): chapter 2
ourned at twelve o'clock; he at once went fifteen miles into the country, and before four o'clock had shot four brace of pheasants,—the learned judge sitting on horseback when he fired, as from his lameness he was unable to walk. He is fond of Shakspeare, and often have we interchanged notes during a long argument from Follett or Wilde (while I was sitting by the side of the latter in the Serjeants' row), the burden of which has been some turn or expression from the great bard,—the crowd supposaminations for degrees are serious, so that it is impossible for one who is entirely lazy or stupid to obtain a degree. Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. Again in town and in this glorious apartment, where I look upon the busts of Milton and Shakspeare, of Locke and Burke, of Bacon and Newton! It was not long since I saw Bulwer writing here; and when he threw down the pen he had been using, the thought crossed my mind to appropriate it, and make my fortune by selling it to some of his absurd
Frederick Pollock (search for this): chapter 2
once had stood the bust of Nelson,—England's greatest admiral, &c. Works, Vol. III. p. 517. to Lord Denman; and Sir Frederick Pollock was so kind as to take me in his carriage. Our cards of invitation said four o'clock for the dinner; but we werellett always meets me on that footing. It was only night before last that I dined at his house. We had at table Sir Frederick Pollock, Serjeant Talfourd, Theodore Hook, 1788-1844. Charles Austin,—one of the cleverest, most enlightened, and agremmon friend in Thomas Brown, ante, Vol. I. p. 156. outdid himself; indeed, I have never seen him in such force. He and Pollock discussed the comparative merits of Demosthenes and Cicero; and Talfourd, with the earnestness which belongs to him, repeated one of Cicero's glorious perorations. Pollock gave a long extract from Homer; and the author of Ion, with the frenzy of a poet, rolled out a whole strophe of one of the Greek dramatists. Theodore looked on in mute admiration, and then told s
e intellectual feast, he is of little value,—vastly inferior to Sydney Smith, whose humor makes your sides shake with laughter for weeks after you have listened to it. We left Follett at about half-past 11 o'clock; and Talfourd carried me to the Garrick, where we found Poole. Talfourd took his two glasses of negus, his grilled bone, and Welsh rare-bit; and both he and Poole entertained me by their reminiscences of Godwin. While I listened late at night to these reminiscences, I did not expe Melbourne come on bended knees before me. He is a very able man. Another morning I went with my friend, Sir Gregory Lewin, to see the Tunnel. By the way, Sir Gregory has in his dining-room the original paintings by Reynolds of Dr. Johnson and Garrick, which have been perpetuated by so many thousand engravings. How strange it seems to me to sit at table and look upon such productions, so time-hallowed, and so full of the richest associations! You must see that I write blindly on; a mere wor
William Shepherd (search for this): chapter 2
account. What passed there I could easier tell than write. I got to bed before the cock crew. Hunting songs and stories abounded. I prize much all the opportunities I have had of mingling in the sports and social enjoyments of the young men; because, on these occasions, I see them as they are without reserve, and thus learn their real characters. I have been trying to get a review in the Edinburgh of Sparks's Life of Washington; and a person of no little literary eminence, Rev. William Shepherd. the bosom friend of Lord Brougham, has written me that he will do it if Brougham does not do it himself. I have strong reason to believe that his Lordship will undertake it, and, if he does, his late efforts give us assurance what we may expect. Your trouble about the loss Sumner had been informed by Hillard of the loss of two of his letters from England, by a friend to whom they had been lent. of the letters is superfluous. I care nothing about their loss; it is their possi
Edward Curry (search for this): chapter 2
to have been a job of Brougham. He was of the Northern circuit, and a friend of Brougham. He is a dull man; but as honest and good-natured as the day. I have seen him perplexed in the extreme, both before a jury and in bane, by the arguments of counsel. He is truly amiable, and is much of a liberal. Lady Coltman is a sister of Duckworth, the Chancery barrister. At Coltman's at dinner, I saw young Wortley hand down Lady Coltman, though there were at table Baron Parke, Vaughan, and Sir Edward Curry. This was strictly correct according to the Heralds' books, as the son of a peer takes precedence of knights, whatever may be their respective ages; but it shocked my notions of propriety. Dec. 14, 1838. Poor Allan Park is dead; and everybody is speculating about his successor. The Solicitor-General will be the man. Park died Dec. 8. Thomas Erskine (not Rolfe) was appointed, Jan. 9, 1839, his successor. Rolfe was appointed a baron of the Exchequer in Nov., 1839. Post, p. 52
Samuel Duckworth (search for this): chapter 2
from 1837 until his death. Sumner was invited at different times to dine at his house, 6 Hyde Park Gardens. whose appointment astonished everybody, and is said to have been a job of Brougham. He was of the Northern circuit, and a friend of Brougham. He is a dull man; but as honest and good-natured as the day. I have seen him perplexed in the extreme, both before a jury and in bane, by the arguments of counsel. He is truly amiable, and is much of a liberal. Lady Coltman is a sister of Duckworth, the Chancery barrister. At Coltman's at dinner, I saw young Wortley hand down Lady Coltman, though there were at table Baron Parke, Vaughan, and Sir Edward Curry. This was strictly correct according to the Heralds' books, as the son of a peer takes precedence of knights, whatever may be their respective ages; but it shocked my notions of propriety. Dec. 14, 1838. Poor Allan Park is dead; and everybody is speculating about his successor. The Solicitor-General will be the man. P
William Pitt (search for this): chapter 2
l, home of metropolitan justice, pomp, and hospitality, in the precise spot where once had stood the bust of Nelson,—England's greatest admiral, &c. Works, Vol. III. p. 517. to Lord Denman; and Sir Frederick Pollock was so kind as to take me in his carriage. Our cards of invitation said four o'clock for the dinner; but we were not seated till seven o'clock. I never saw any thing so antique and feudal. The hall was gloriously illuminated by gas, and the marble monuments of Lord Chatham, William Pitt, and Nelson added to the historic grandeur of the scene. I could hardly believe that I was not on the stage, partaking in some of the shallow banquets there served, when the herald, decked with ribbons, standing on an elevated place behind the Lord Mayor, proclaimed that the Right Honorable the Lord Mayor to his guests, —lords, ladies, and gentlemen, all,—drank a cup of loving kindness. The effect of the scene was much enhanced by the presence of women decked in the richest style; among<
Robert Burns (search for this): chapter 2
t not strange that I should be put to inquire at a dozen doors in that village, to know where Miss Baillie lived? In my vexation, I told one person who lived within a stone's throw of what I afterwards found to be the simple roof of the poetess, that he did not know the residence of the greatest ornament of his town! Another morning was devoted to Carlyle. Thomas Carlyle, 1795—.He had, prior to 1839, published besides miscellaneous papers the Sartor Resartus, and French Revolution. His Burns had been read with great interest by Sumner when in College, ante, Vol. I., p. 50. The following was written to Sumner (the newspaper fragment referred to is Professor Andrews Norton's reply to George Ripley in a discussion concerning The Latest Form of Infidelity):— Chelsea, Feb. 14, 1839. my dear Sir,—Could you return this newspaper fragment of the Socinian Pope to Mr. Coolidge, lest I lose it in the interim? Doubtless, he and you would like to see the poison, now that you are fort<
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 2
Ireland from April, 1839, to September, 1841. Sumner received kindly attentions from him during his the Law of Infancy and Coverture. He invited Sumner to dine in Dec., 1838, at 34 Mecklenburgh Squa Believe me, ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber, Columbia, S. ct that they address me without any prefix, as Sumner; and I, of course, do the same with them. Sirbsence on the circuit will prevent his shaking Sumner's hand again, but hopes to renew their acquainccount of her,—Autobiography, Vol. I. p. 230. Sumner met her on his second visit to England, in 185octer, 1825-1864, was Mr. Procter's daughter. Sumner made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. Montagu,l and some of his Friends, pp. 9, 47, 65, 101. Sumner was one of the guests, in 1859, at a dinner giving sent us any work of his; but in answer to Sumner's question, how he could best repay English ho may expect. Your trouble about the loss Sumner had been informed by Hillard of the loss of tw[25 more...]
Robert Inglis (search for this): chapter 2
ter, to meet Lord Brougham and Roebuck; the next to dine with Sir Robert Inglis, the most distinguished Tory now in town; then with Sir Grego till it was time for me to go to town to dress for dinner at Sir Robert Inglis's,—thus passing from the leader of the Radicals to one of ther 5. To-night my invitations were to dinner at Brougham's, Sir Robert Inglis's, Mr. Justice Littledale's, and Mr. Kenyon's; at the latter m, as his invitation came first, and hoped to be able to drop in at Inglis's and Kenyon's; but we sat so late at table that I could only reach Inglis's, and then get home at midnight, trusting to some future opportunity of meeting Southey and Rogers: the last, of course, I may see ev1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admirationnat in piscem mulier formosa superne. Through the kindness of Sir Robert Inglis I have been enabled to have a copy taken; which will cost abo
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