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tional law, his only published article, during the year 1842, was a review of Professor Greenleaf's treatise on the Law of Evidence, then first issued. American Jurist, July, 1842, Vol. XXVII. pp. 379-408. In the early part of the year he taught in the Law School as Judge Story's substitute. His social life varied this year little from what it had been during the two preceding. In the spring he visited New York with Prescott,—their special errand being to meet Washington Irving. In January he had many pleasant interviews with Dickens, who brought a letter to him from John Kenyon, and who was grateful for his kindness. Dickens's Life, Vol. I. p. 305. Late in August he met Lord Ashburton, who was then in Boston, and visited with him places of interest in the city and suburbs. With Lord Morpeth, who was journeying in various parts of the country, he continued his correspondence. Morpeth sailed on his return Sept. 29. Sumner passed the last five days in New York with him,—
January 4th (search for this): chapter 24
rring words that shall move the whole land. Send them home, and we will publish them. To Thomas Crawford, Rome. Boston, May 14, 1842. my dear Crawford,--. . . After I had completed my subscription for the Orpheus,—that is, after I had got all the names on paper that I supposed would subscribe,—I put the subscription-paper into a pigeon-hole without collecting the money, where it lay undisturbed, among other documents, till I was aroused from my slumbers by your most welcome letter of Jan. 4. . . . I read Greene's letters in the Knickerbocker with great pleasure. 1 fear that there is but little chance of any great change with regard to his consulate. Perhaps you are aware that I made an effort to bring about some improvement. He wrote letters to members of Congress and persons of influence in behalf of the Consulate at Rome. Mr. Webster said there would be no difficulty in appropriating one thousand dollars to our Consul at Rome, by way of salary; and said that he would
January 12th (search for this): chapter 24
uld send instructions to our ministers to discontinue their uniforms,—the Kow-towof Europe. Ever and ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Lieber he wrote, Jan. 11, 1842:— Howe will soon publish another report on Laura. She, poor girl, was delighted at his return. She cried with joy; and her nervous excitement deprived her fingers for a while of the power of language. To Jacob Harvey, New York. Boston, Jan. 14, 1842. My dear sir,—I have been much gratified by your letter of Jan. 12, which I have just received with the newspaper containing an able article on War with England. I agree with you entirely with regard to the Creole affair,—except, perhaps, that I go further than you do. In the first place, England cannot deliver up the slaves who are not implicated in the mutiny and murder by which the government of the ship was overthrown. She has laid down a rule not to recognize property in human beings since the date of her great Emancipation Act. The principle of
January 21st (search for this): chapter 24
ted in the Boston Advertiser. Jan. 4 and Feb. 10, 1842. Sumner's first article was republished in the National Intelligencer, Feb. 5. They reply at length to the positions taken by Mr. Stevenson, the American Minister, in his correspondence with the British Foreign Secretary. The second is a rejoinder to an article of Mr. Perkins, of Salem, who, in a communication to the same newspaper, had reviewed Sumner's first article. The article of Mr. Perkins was published in the Advertiser, Jan. 21. Mr. Webster, in his subsequent correspondence as Secretary of State, contended strongly against the asserted right of visit and inquiry, whether as a right of search or as a more limited right of inquiry for verifying nationality; Letters to Mr. Cass of April 5, 1842, and to Mr. Everett of March 28, 1843. Webster's Works, Vol. VI. pp. 329-346. and publicists generally are in accord with him. President Woolsey, however, regards the distinction between search for ascertaining nat
February 5th (search for this): chapter 24
She disclaimed the right to seize the vessel if found to be American, although engaged in the traffic, and limited the asserted right to one of mere inquiry for the purpose of verifying nationality. This qualified right of search, or of inquiry,as he preferred to call it, Sumner maintained in two elaborate articles, both filling five and a half columns, and printed in the Boston Advertiser. Jan. 4 and Feb. 10, 1842. Sumner's first article was republished in the National Intelligencer, Feb. 5. They reply at length to the positions taken by Mr. Stevenson, the American Minister, in his correspondence with the British Foreign Secretary. The second is a rejoinder to an article of Mr. Perkins, of Salem, who, in a communication to the same newspaper, had reviewed Sumner's first article. The article of Mr. Perkins was published in the Advertiser, Jan. 21. Mr. Webster, in his subsequent correspondence as Secretary of State, contended strongly against the asserted right of visit
February 6th (search for this): chapter 24
negotiated by Lord Lyons and Mr. Seward. Wheaton's International Law (Dana's edition), pp. 201-203, note; 213-217, note. Chancellor Kent wrote, Jan. 7, 1842:— I thank you for the Boston paper containing your view of the question of the Right of search on the coast of Africa. I have no hesitation in subscribing to it as entirely sound, logical, and conclusive. There is no doubt of it; and the neatness and elegance with which it is written are delightful. Judge Story wrote, Feb. 6:— I am glad to know that Mr. Prescott and Chancellor Kent approve of your article on the Right of search. It confirms my previous opinion of its intrinsic soundness. I do not exactly know whether Mr. Webster and Mr. Legare concur in its doctrines, but I shall be surprised if they do not. He wrote as to the second article, Feb. 20— I go along with you throughout. This last article is written with a close logic and lawyer-like precision; or rather, I should say, with the com<
February 8th (search for this): chapter 24
niversary of the graduation of the first class of the University. Come and hear it. This will be a literary festival, characteristic of the country, and everybody will be glad to see you. I am going, for a few days, among the hills of Berkshire with my sisters; but I shall always be within hail from Boston. Good-night. As ever, ever yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor Mittermaier, Heidelberg. Boston, Aug. 4, 1842. my dear friend,—I am ashamed that I have left your kind letter of Feb. 8 for so long a time without acknowledgment; but various calls have absorbed my time, and I now write in haste in order to introduce to you my friend, Mr. Wheeler, Charles S. Wheeler, who died at Leipsic, in 1843, at the age of twenty-six. who has been for some time a tutor in Harvard University. He has published a valuable edition of Herodotus, and has otherwise made himself very favorably known to the scholars of my country. He hopes to pass several months in delightful Heidelberg; and
February 20th (search for this): chapter 24
sound, logical, and conclusive. There is no doubt of it; and the neatness and elegance with which it is written are delightful. Judge Story wrote, Feb. 6:— I am glad to know that Mr. Prescott and Chancellor Kent approve of your article on the Right of search. It confirms my previous opinion of its intrinsic soundness. I do not exactly know whether Mr. Webster and Mr. Legare concur in its doctrines, but I shall be surprised if they do not. He wrote as to the second article, Feb. 20— I go along with you throughout. This last article is written with a close logic and lawyer-like precision; or rather, I should say, with the comprehensive grasp of a publicist dealing with the general law of nations, and not with the municipal doctrines of a particular country. Letters approving his view came also from Rufus Choate and Theodore Sedgwick. The peculiar character of slave ownership as against common right, and existing only under positive municipal law, became a
April 14th (search for this): chapter 24
reole question is noted by Mr. Ticknor, who names him as the only person he met, who was vehement against Mr. Webster's letter. Life of George Ticknor, Vol. II. p. 199. It appears also in his vigorous letters, written at the time, to Mr. Harvey and Dr. Lieber. He replied in the Advertiser to some legal criticisms which a correspondent of that journal had made on Dr. Channing's pamphlet. His article was printed April 18. The articles of Dr. Channing's critic, signed C., were printed April 14 and 25. In this reply, he said:— It would ill accord with the spirit of English law to allow the liberty of a human being to be restrained by the meshes of technicalities like those woven by the writer in the Advertiser. The single vigorous principle that within the British Empire no right of property can exist in a human being extends like a flaming sword around all its courts and territories, cutting asunder the bonds of every slave who approaches English earth. Not only his pa
April 18th (search for this): chapter 24
dvice was sought in relation to them. Sumner's great interest in the Creole question is noted by Mr. Ticknor, who names him as the only person he met, who was vehement against Mr. Webster's letter. Life of George Ticknor, Vol. II. p. 199. It appears also in his vigorous letters, written at the time, to Mr. Harvey and Dr. Lieber. He replied in the Advertiser to some legal criticisms which a correspondent of that journal had made on Dr. Channing's pamphlet. His article was printed April 18. The articles of Dr. Channing's critic, signed C., were printed April 14 and 25. In this reply, he said:— It would ill accord with the spirit of English law to allow the liberty of a human being to be restrained by the meshes of technicalities like those woven by the writer in the Advertiser. The single vigorous principle that within the British Empire no right of property can exist in a human being extends like a flaming sword around all its courts and territories, cutting asunder
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